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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

As promised, I wanted to post up somewhat of a review comparison and my experiences owning / experiencing each bike - '15 300R, '14 600RR, and a '15 Rebel. It may not feel like a full review, but we can gladly use this thread for questions / answers and to better help give my thoughts.

Honestly, this review and comparison is rubbish, unless I remain unbiased. And so I will.

Let's see, where do I start?

Without having good seat time on the 300R, entering into a 600 would would be a nightmare. The 300R allowed me to understand the functions, switches, and controls in regards to operating a motorcycle... With this said, it also allowed my mind to have the space in working with the demand and attention required of operating a much more advanced bike. Not to say that I was ready or not, but it prepared me better.

As expected, the 600 has LOADS of MASSIVE power - clearly and easily very difficult to use on public streets. It's just much more power than I will ever need. The bike goes to 15k rpm, and getting up to 6 - 7k, I'm already blowing past everyone with authority. The 600 is a bike which can make one look extremely guilty with the very least amount of effort. It's also a bike which one can get frustrated with because you just can't get the most use out of it. I can clearly see it being too much bike to make use of.

The motor on the 600 truly feels exotic and special. It alone defines the specialty and cost of this bike. I'm still hesitant on approaching the 15k limit, however I did approach 10 - 11k yesterday, and WOW with an exclamation point! This bike is unreal. Full of adrenaline.

The 600 is better lived at higher speeds, and that's where you feel the benefits and purpose of this kind of animal. Is it good for everyday riding like I do? Sure, but I won't be getting the point of this bike and what it's about. As mentioned before, its character is oozing with performance and adrenaline - and I do love it for that. I have no regrets.

The 300 is much more athletic at lower speeds and is more fun at that, especially within city riding. Less adrenaline, but it's absolute fun to max out and get the most of it while using the entire rev range. No intimidation, especially once you've racked up good experience and seat time on it - after a while, it's just a pure blast to ride at every chance. The brakes seem to respond better at lower speeds and easily manage the bike better than the 600 at those same speeds.

As far as highway riding, the 600 feels more stable and perfectly at home. Feels more safe, planted, and balanced. The 300 can definitely handle it, don't get me wrong.

Maybe you're curious... How big of a jump was it for me to jump from no motorcycle experience to the 300, compared to jumping from the 300 to the 600. Well, I honestly feel that with no experience underneath me, it was a much bigger learning curve to first get on the 300 and really learn it. The 600 is a very advanced bike, but it's not as intimidating after 800 miles on it - though I understand that I still need to be very cautious because things can go wrong when you're most confident. In order to successfully manage and ride a 600, you need to possess a certain level of fear - and that's actually healthy to have. On the 300, you can get away with a lot. On the 600, every input (especially in the wrist) MUST be extremely gentle and easy. Other than all this, the 600 was easier than I expected but it was best for me to approach it this way anyway... And I'm happy I went into it scared for my life. It made things easier on me in the long run while keeping the bike and myself a bit safer.

Now for the good part. The '15 Rebel. It was a gift for my Dad, and I've been sharing it with him because I'm afraid that it'll get left alone in the garage - but it's actually fantastic to ride, honestly. Now this is a true motorcycle. It's raw. It's flawed. And it's beautiful. You may think I'm pathetic, but I feel it's more of a joy to ride than both the 600 and the 300... And I wouldn't mind ditching both. 84 mpg. Fair power. Extremely nimble. Superb build quality. It's an extremely underrated bike, and you better believe it. After jumping off the 600 and jumping on the Rebel, I had to relearn a lot... I was caught off guard and was very surprised because it felt more advanced and very different. It's a cruiser style bike so that may explain a bit. The brakes on the Rebel are very weak, and I have to hugely depend on engine braking. It's good because it teaches me something that I may not have understood as well before. Also, the sensation of speed can easily be felt with more clarity than the other bikes, especially with the lower to the ground design. Skinny handle bars to grasp with the motor and everything vibrating through your hands, it's a very undiluted experience which the other two bikes can't touch.

So this is some insight as to my thoughts... Please feel free to fire away with questions / feedback and I'd be happy to provide my added input.

Fyi, I'm also a member of the 600 and Rebel forums as well, so here are links to the thread I posted on those respective forums:

* http://www.600rr.net/vb/15-general-discussion/519922-300r-|-600rr-|-rebel.html

* http://www.hondarebelforum.com/f38/300r-600rr-rebel-71809.html





 

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Great write up Fanatic, cheers for that. You've obviously got a healthy amount of respect going on there for the potential performance of the 600.
Interesting that the Rebel came out on top as the fun bike eh :D
 

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Lol, the 600 will be more "fun" the better you get at riding it. The rebel is probably fun to putt around town but on a mountain/twisty/interesting road you can't possibly tell me you'd rather be on a baby cruiser.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Great write up Fanatic, cheers for that. You've obviously got a healthy amount of respect going on there for the potential performance of the 600.
Interesting that the Rebel came out on top as the fun bike eh :D
None of the bikes are better than one another. It just comes down to preference and what type if riding or mood one is in. They are all fantastic in their very own ways.

Thanks for the props, kiwi!

Lol, the 600 will be more "fun" the better you get at riding it. The rebel is probably fun to putt around town but on a mountain/twisty/interesting road you can't possibly tell me you'd rather be on a baby cruiser.
That would be fun in a different way - Yeah, I can see pushing the 600RR like it's designed, but that may not be as applicable with daily use. Neither of the bikes are more fun than each other, however each can thrill in their very own ways. Credit goes where it belongs - to the rider and the bike he or she prefers riding at the particular moment.

It's a challenge to find and ride the roads that the 600RR is designed for - especially when riding it every day. Canyons (like you mentioned), especially track days are prime locations to enjoy this bike, indeed. And I will gladly and surely get better with riding the 600 as time and riding progresses - we'll have to see if the views change though, wink, wink.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
After all that crap you took on the 600 RR.net site...you are still a member???? (Gasp!) Is there not another less ass wholeish site? :)
No comments, lol! We'll see how much longer I can last over there, haha... :laugh:

Hey fanatic where did you purchase your bikes from?, i ask since we both live in north dallas area
PM sent. Keep in mind that I'm not biased towards any dealer, the one I go to happens to have the bike I want, and seems to be fair.
 

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Thanks for taking the time to do the reviews/comparisons, Fanatic. It was an interesting read, especially for a newb like me. The 300 is the first bike I've ever owned. The motorcycle safety class I took had a Rebel. I didn't mind it at all. I also rode their CBR 250 and fell in love with it. It is what pushed me into getting my 300.
I entered the Safety Class with the idea of getting a CBR125. I rode the school's and liked it, but once I'd riden the 250 there was no going back.
 

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Take my word for it Fanatic. Once you have enough "fun" experiences on your 600 in the right scenario you will want to always ride your baby. It will remind you of the good times, plus that way you know you are always ready should the mood strike to take the long way home (yeah, yeah the 300 can be fun on the way home too I know). If there aren't enough roads near you to do that? Trip time. Best part of motorcycling. But like I said, the more you get confident and bond with your bike, the more you will lack the desire to get on another. Especially a mundane, boring, plain, underpowered coffee-shop cruiser......just saying.
 

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How is managing the weight difference between the 300 and 600? One of the main reasons I picked the 300 was the low weight compared to other bikes I was considering. That said each track day I wish the pegs were higher and the riding position more aggressive. Then I drive to work and am glad that isn't the case! I can see myself ending up with 2 bikes eventually rather than trying to do both types of riding on one.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Take my word for it Fanatic. Once you have enough "fun" experiences on your 600 in the right scenario you will want to always ride your baby. It will remind you of the good times, plus that way you know you are always ready should the mood strike to take the long way home (yeah, yeah the 300 can be fun on the way home too I know). If there aren't enough roads near you to do that? Trip time. Best part of motorcycling. But like I said, the more you get confident and bond with your bike, the more you will lack the desire to get on another. Especially a mundane, boring, plain, underpowered coffee-shop cruiser......just saying.
True, but I strongly feel that one is restricted on a 600 on public roads. I have absolutely no doubt that the 600RR is much more of a bike than the Rebel - on the track that is. That's where one's skills can be developed and the bike's potential can safely and truly be explored. The 600 is too much bike for my streets, no doubt about it. It's just that capable of a bike from the factory. I don't have the balls to break the rules of the road as much as I used to - and that's not to say I don't, but the 600RR can definitely be a high-risk.

* Like you pointed towards, it's best to pick and choose the right locations to ride this type of high-performing machine - safely and in a controlled environment would be preferable, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
How is managing the weight difference between the 300 and 600? One of the main reasons I picked the 300 was the low weight compared to other bikes I was considering. That said each track day I wish the pegs were higher and the riding position more aggressive. Then I drive to work and am glad that isn't the case! I can see myself ending up with 2 bikes eventually rather than trying to do both types of riding on one.
Hands down, managing the weight of the 300 is easier and it's more athletic, especially at lower everyday speeds. The 600 is a high speed machine, and it's easier to manage the faster you're going. The 300 is somewhat the opposite, but is still easy to manage across the board. Even though the 600RR is one of the more street friendly supersports, it's going to be that rare cup of tea that only a few would prefer. It's higher performing and has its own specific compromises. It's a lot of bike, and it shows and feels in every way.
 

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Hands down, managing the weight of the 300 is easier and it's more athletic, especially at lower everyday speeds. The 600 is a high speed machine, and it's easier to manage the faster you're going. The 300 is somewhat the opposite, but is still easy to manage across the board. Even though the 600RR is one of the more street friendly supersports, it's going to be that rare cup of tea that only a few would prefer. It's higher performing and has its own specific compromises. It's a lot of bike, and it shows and feels in every way.
Thanks for the insight! At what speed do you feel like it starts to settle in and become comfortable (is ~60mph the transition?) I have driven track cars that you have to hammer on WOT etc. or they don't run right, sounds like it isn't quite that bad. But my commute is on 35-55mph roads so it would probably just get frustrating. At least if I got a track-only bike I wouldn't have the insurance cost! That said I would want to get some practice before hammering it on track just to get used to it.

So many folks just crap on me for not buying one already rather than answer my questions! Thanks again for your insight!!
 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Thanks for the insight! At what speed do you feel like it starts to settle in and become comfortable (is ~60mph the transition?) I have driven track cars that you have to hammer on WOT etc. or they don't run right, sounds like it isn't quite that bad. But my commute is on 35-55mph roads so it would probably just get frustrating. At least if I got a track-only bike I wouldn't have the insurance cost! That said I would want to get some practice before hammering it on track just to get used to it.

So many folks just crap on me for not buying one already rather than answer my questions! Thanks again for your insight!!
It starts settling in as you progress and build up on that speed. It can be frustrating when the speed limit is below 50 - 55 mph. Everything including the motor and tires are bigger, so just takes that higher velocity to understand the bike better. It can still be a fun bike though - if you can somehow control yourself within the rules of the road, but that's going to be the challenge - that's where the track comes into play.

The 300 does more than enough to cover what the 600 can do. I wanted the 600 because of how exotic it feels, performs, and looks - I will push it a bit as more seat time comes. I have just under 1k mikes on the bike currently.

Don't let others pressure you on going for this kind of bike - it's not really that big of a deal other than it gets your select juices flowing... LoL.
 

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Fanatic, im glad you haven't come off this forum, buddy.
I appreciate your review and comparison. It was FANtAsTIC sir. Maybe one day I can haul my 300 up there to Plano and catch a ride with you :) I think we share pretty much the same riding style.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Fanatic, im glad you haven't come off this forum, buddy.
I appreciate your review and comparison. It was FANtAsTIC sir. Maybe one day I can haul my 300 up there to Plano and catch a ride with you :) I think we share pretty much the same riding style.
Happy to hear of your support and appreciation, partner. Anytime, you're in the area, please let me know - would be very cool to catch a ride together... And yes, it will be FANtAsTIC! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Update:

Just under 3k miles on the 600RR. I've really gotten used to and broken myself into the RR. 15k rpm has become easier to come by... Well, at least in 1st gear. After that, it's just too much speed to safely carry out in public, especially when danger can creep up FAST. There's absolutely no logic or sense in jumping up to a supersport, but it's definitely an extraordinary experience if you're into that sort of thing. One thing's for sure, each time I start it up, any level of boredom is simply tossed out the window. I must truthfully admit that it feels wrong not to ride this bike the way it was intended / designed.

The Rebel has about 1,500 miles on the clock... It's a little harsh on my lower back, but I try to manage by lifting up prior to oncoming bumps. Still a great bike which is also preferred in the colder climates (when riding can be a bit more challenging).
 

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Great review. I recently upgraded to a 2014 CB 500 F (with only 2 KM on the odometer). It has no where near the power of the 600 RR but I'm really enjoying the jump up in power and it still has a fairly comfortable riding position (although it's more aggressive than the 300 F was, I have to make sure to not put too much weight on the handle bars). The larger tires are really nice for dealing with pavement imperfections and adds confidence when I'm leaning. Its weight feels really planted and I can shift my weight on the bike without rocking the bike side to side; although it was great to practice shifting my weight carefully on the 300. The weight is annoying when in tight spaces like garages though. It's still nimble but it takes more slightly concerted effort to perform sharp turns at speed and changes of direction in S-turns. It's not an issue it just takes more thought and presence of mind.

One odd thing is that I think the 500 F's aerodynamics are a bit off (although I'll think more on this later). On the 300 F I felt mostly like I was a knife cutting through the air where the cowl on the 500 has an odd scoop that I think traps the air and it kind of felt like I was plowing through the air rather than cutting through it. The engine could plow through it easily but it felt like I was riding on a large brick rather than a knife. I might change my opinion on this later but it felt odd. It might just be that it's a heavier, larger bike and that's what going 120 kph on such a bike feels like. If so, the 300 really is a gem since the size and weight really offer nice benefits for several reasons.

Acceleration can either be tame or quite fast. It's easy to manage and not accidentally do something that I didn't want to do, like the 300. It's an incredibly great all-arounder. It's easy to manage the power but I gave it some throttle in third or fourth gear and I went from 80 kph to 110 in about 1 second. Passing will be easier on this bike and less dangerous (for taking too long like it might on the 300). First gear is taller so stop and go traffic is more enjoyable (although I didn't feel it was too bad on the 300) and I don't need to shift into second gear during a turn (although it will rev up a bit still while performing the turn). The clutch pull is a lot heavier so my hand has gotten tired (but I'll have ninja strength in my left hand soon). Maybe when it has worn-in it'll be less but for more carefree riding, the 300's clutch pull is really light. The feeling of it pulling forward is more enjoyable than on the 300 which started to lose any sensation after I got used to its acceleration (but it might get old too). I haven't red-lined the 500 but even from the conservative acceleration that I've been doing, there's a lot more on tap.

The brakes feel similar to the 300 although they haven't been worn in yet. Spongy rear that doesn't add much, and decent front brake.

The bike looks gorgeous. Red. I've had multiple people just stop and stare as I'm riding, and I've only been on a few rides so far with it. I got a bunch of compliments from friends and strangers on my 300 but the 500 is a real head-turner. Multiple women thought it was cool when I got the Pearl White 300 but when I got the red 500 they were like "OMG that's hot!!!".

Ultimately, the weight of the bike takes a bit more skill for low speeds and changing direction but otherwise it's a fairly conservative bike that's a great step from 125's or 300's. I'm glad that I cut my teeth on the 300 first as I got a lot of fundamentals down so when I test rode the 500 I thought to myself "This is just incremental improvements to every aspect of the 300". Oh and the engine is smooth as silk! I never felt the that 300 has an issue with smoothness until I rode the 500. It felt like going from sandpaper underwear to silk! I was sold immediately on the smoothness alone. There is vibration in the seat at high RPM but newer Honda's seem to vibrate during the break-in period then it smooths out after a couple thousands KM's.
 

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I just found this thread. Good review, Fanatic. I've owned similar bikes- a 2009 GZ250, a 2010 Kawasaki 500 Vulcan, and now, the Gixxer 600 and CB300F. Someone asked about weight, and that is a noticeable difference. I remember more than once getting in uncomfortable situations on heavier bikes...like the Gixxer 1000 where I had to park on gravel or just with the front slightly downward, and had a difficult time getting the bike turned around. The lighter the bike, the easier it is to maneuver at slow speeds, moving it, or just saving it if it begins to fall. Same with seat ht. The low seat hts. of cruisers make them much easier to handle especially if you are shorter. The Rebel and GZ250 are common bikes furnished for the Motorcycle Safety courses as you know in part because they are easiest to ride. My little GZ250 was air cooled and sounded terrible at highway speeds and would rattle and shake a bit. It's fine as a city bike, but so are a lot of other small bikes. Just not a good highway bike. I agree about not being able to use the 600 on city roads. I just paid a $465 fine for speeding (63 in a 35) and am re-thinking riding the bike on the street. As someone said, you can find yourself 30 mph over the speed limit really quick. My favorite bike is the CB300F...for me. It's the smallest bike that does everything well with a low enough seat ht. and light enough weight to make it easy to handle. I would rank the 250s as the slightly better learning bike with the 300 very close and a much better bike after the initial learning curve and you want to hit the highway. I know the Rebel will go 70, but it isn't a pretty sight.
 
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