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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to pickup a CBR300R in a few weeks once I get my learners license sorted (only theory to go now).

Anyway, in NZ the dealers have knocked a little off the price of the base CBR300R but the ABS model is a full NZ$1000 more still. What are your guys thoughts on the ABS for a total motorbike newbie for the extra outlay cost?
 

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Ive never had it on a bike so I don't feel a need for it. I guess you dont miss what you've never had! I'd put the money towards a hot exhaust myself!
 
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What are your guys thoughts on the ABS for a total motorbike newbie for the extra outlay cost?
Eh, don't worry about it. I don't have it. I am a novice rider myself, and granted I am very very careful on the road, I have had no real need for it, yet anyway. I always ride in ideal conditions (for me). Im sure it could be a standard feature on your next bike so worry about it then maybe.
 

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When I was shopping for a new bike, I made sure to find one with ABS (Prob the biggest reason why I went for the 300R and not the 300F). Resale value improves, and if you NEED it (and I've already engaged it twice in the last 3 months of ownership), you'll be happy you have it. Some insurance companies offer discounts for having ABS as well.
 

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I got mine with ABS with the idea that id rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it, any extra safety is good to me.
 

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ABS is ideal for sure. I personally don't have it on my 300R. I grab the brakes and the bike stops like a champ every time. Just rather spend my money on other goodies for my bike. Just my opinion.
 

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It's not absolutely necessary but it's something that does help. Some people don't like them but it's clearly great for the added safety
 

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ABS is something that you don't need until that time that you need it. It can be very helpful in some circumstances to keep you safe. I would say it is worth the extra investment especially since you are a new rider.
 

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If I had to do it all over again, I'd still skip the ABS option... Just prefer to keep things simple. Not to say that you should too. I've read about folks that must have it or strongly prefer it. There's no wrong in whichever way you go.

If you want it bad enough, the $1,000 doesn't seem too big of a deal afterwards. If you're the type of person who is seriously stuck on the fence, just get it... That way you'll have the extra safety option that you likely won't regret later on anyway.

Good luck with the decision... You'll come out a winner regardless.
 
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Looking to pickup a CBR300R in a few weeks once I get my learners license sorted (only theory to go now).

Anyway, in NZ the dealers have knocked a little off the price of the base CBR300R but the ABS model is a full NZ$1000 more still. What are your guys thoughts on the ABS for a total motorbike newbie for the extra outlay cost?
Whichever version you end up choosing, make sure you get yourself into a beginners rider safety course. Nothing wrong with getting the ABS version per se, however too many new riders think that ABS is the "end all, be all" as far as being safe goes. It's not. In fact ABS stopping distances will generally be longer than with the same model bike without ABS.

Another thing to consider regarding ABS, is that it doesn't work very well at all on dirt & gravel roads... even paved roads covered in sand can be problematic for an ABS equipped bike. Basically a bike with an ABS brake system, when operating on dirt, doesn't want to apply enough brake pressure to slow and stop the bike when the rider wants it to. This is why most of the larger Adventure/Dual Sport motorcycles, like the BMW GS bikes for example, have a switch so that the rider can turn off the ABS system and then operate as a conventional brake system when being ridden on the dirt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Whichever version you end up choosing, make sure you get yourself into a beginners rider safety course.
Planning to do this anyway for sure. The guy I took my basic skills handling course with (requirement in NZ before doing your thoery), does 1 to 1 courses afterwards to get you up to speed for the next license so I plan on doing this as well.
 

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There might be an initial outlay of extra money for ABS but since this is your first bike, in addition to safety, you have extra re-sale value if you decide to move on to something bigger.

It's a wise investment for a lot of reasons.
 

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Whichever version you end up choosing, make sure you get yourself into a beginners rider safety course. Nothing wrong with getting the ABS version per se, however too many new riders think that ABS is the "end all, be all" as far as being safe goes. It's not. In fact ABS stopping distances will generally be longer than with the same model bike without ABS.

Another thing to consider regarding ABS, is that it doesn't work very well at all on dirt & gravel roads... even paved roads covered in sand can be problematic for an ABS equipped bike. Basically a bike with an ABS brake system, when operating on dirt, doesn't want to apply enough brake pressure to slow and stop the bike when the rider wants it to. This is why most of the larger Adventure/Dual Sport motorcycles, like the BMW GS bikes for example, have a switch so that the rider can turn off the ABS system and then operate as a conventional brake system when being ridden on the dirt.
Hey not sure if I agree with this comment about the stopping distance being greater.
"In fact ABS stopping distances will generally be longer than with the same model bike without ABS."
The only real time ABS would go further is when offroad or wet contitions. Correct me if I am wrong.
Here is a video of ABS being tested.
http://youtu.be/TrWOeD9FDgU
 

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Here is a video of ABS being tested.
http://youtu.be/TrWOeD9FDgU
So I watched that video...and I kinda feel that the wet conditions test looked a little indulged for the non ABS bike. That was a lot of wiggle. And who actually enjoys riding in unsafe wet conditions and putting themselves in a situation like that anyway, if it can be avoided.
Eh, bottom line, ABS is a preference or a piece of mind I suppose.
 

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So I watched that video...and I kinda feel that the wet conditions test looked a little indulged for the non ABS bike. That was a lot of wiggle. And who actually enjoys riding in unsafe wet conditions and putting themselves in a situation like that anyway, if it can be avoided.
Eh, bottom line, ABS is a preference or a piece of mind I suppose.
Once one of your wheels lock it is very easy for a bike to stop moving in a straight line. It then becomes incredibly difficult to compensate for and that is probably the product of what you're seeing in the "training wheels" section of the video. In MSF they teach you that once your front wheel locks you are to immediately let go of the brake to correct then reapply. I think the discussion on stopping distance doesn't matter unless it's coupled with control.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well I've done it! Purchased a Tri Colour CBR300R none ABS model today! Pick it up on Saturday afternoon as it needs registering etc and I want a quieter day to pick it up as it'll be my first time on the road on a manual bike so want a quiet ride home.

May drive steady round the corner to an unused company car park and ride it round that for 20minutes to get a feel for it!

Went for the None ABS model in the main mainly on price. In NZ it was a $1000 premium for the ABS, and on a $6000 bike thats a lot of change to plump down, plus the fact I need to sort a better jacket and some boots I thought I would get the none ABS and get the gear sorted instead. My textile jacket at the moment doesn't flow any air so being 31c/90f? today was awful!

Really freaking excited, and a little nervous now :D
 

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Good idea investing in some quality kit, I've done the same in the past few months. Finally moved on from the leather jacket and got myself a more lighter and breathable 'Dri Rider' jacket. Has a removable liner for summer, really happy with it, should've done it years ago!
My only thoughts on boots would be don't get something too chunky so that you have nice feel at the gear lever and brake pedal.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Thanks! Yeah when I got my scooter I just picked up a cheap $100 textile Neo jacket from the store at the time. Its really waterproof but man, zero air gets into that thing so I was baking on the trip home today.

Have been researching a lot of gear, but none of the local NZ stores have them and just seem to have the older ranges so doing some more reading tonight on those. Don't want to risk ordering from overseas on things like jackets/boots in case they are the wrong size.

Yeah found some decent Alpine Stars boots, just over the ankle (fastback WP) which should work so possibly going to try them out tomorrow. But yeah want to get some boots and a jacket really, something with some armour in the elbows/shoulders for starters. Will then look at some pants after that, so will have to just rock jeans for the time being.
 

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Congrats... Read that you were a little nervous and very excited at the same time. No worries, I was too. Just start out slowly and go at your own pace without any pressure.

Enjoy the experience!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Congrats... Read that you were a little nervous and very excited at the same time. No worries, I was too. Just start out slowly and go at your own pace without any pressure.

Enjoy the experience!
Thanks! Yeah its a good nervous though, more from the side that apart from the basic skills license test in a car park, I've not ridden a manual motorbike on the road before. Sure I've been on the road with a scooter for 9 months so am comfortable with all that, but getting out there with a brand new bike and learning how to shift etc all at the same time, going to be an interesting ride home lol.

But yep, will take it slow and doing it on a weekend so the traffic is quieter

More excited than nervous :D
 
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