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Do not keep your foot tucked under the shift lever while cornering.

I got too comfortable yesterday maybe a little too confident after spending two hours in the canyons. I had downshifted before a corner and instead of putting the ball of my foot on the peg I slid it down to get ready for the next shift and my foot got wedged between the pavement and shift lever mid lean.

I was wearing boots so nothing happened to my foot but it scared the piss out of me and somehow I locked my brakes standing the bike up mid lean! This was at the apex of a downhill left turn, I slid sideways and counter steered and the tires gripped and the tail whipped back the other way and I slid again, then straightened out before the edge of the road and continued down, pulled over and stepped off wondering what the **** just happened?

I'm really glad I didn't wipe out. I think if I was on a heavier less forgiving bike it would have sent me into the ditch. There's a tiny quarter size flatspot on the side of my rear tire.

Proper posture and footing is very important.
 

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Glad your ok. Good advice too. It's a good reminder to make sure we don't let bad habits develop or continue. It's playing with fire. Ride safe.
 

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Ive done the same thing at the track but perhaps without the same level of reaction, It's quite disconcerting eh.
I'm reluctant to reverse my shift pattern tho for the same reasons as you.
I have two friends who race but they don't ride on the road at all or even own road bikes so it's not a problem for them to swap their shift pattern over.
 

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Well.. I must say CONGRATS for saving for butt and the bike. I'll bet you were shacking like a leaf when you dismounted. I know I would have been AND probably crapped my pants in the process...so good for you for handling the situation.

I remember "corner carving" years ago and I always had the balls of my feet on the pegs...never had my foot near the shifter. Thanks for posting this....new riders may pick up a good point or two and you for having the insight to point out what not to do....(thumbs up!)
 

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glad to see all worked out ok for this almost moment

for me one of the most important attributes for the cb300f is it's light weight, the small engine size & single cylinder contributes to the light weight, that being said in the twisties & passing these are two areas where some judgement is required considering the limitations of the small displacement bike, another area is left & right hand turns at intersections as I tend to shift out of first gear as soon as possible after launching so I am used to the fact that my toe is under the shift lever especially if turning left

passing is a given that the conditions have to be such kind a no brainer for a 300cc single, however the issue of twisties is not as straight forward, credit to JNO for bringing this up in another thead re: post #10 for lack of torque at least in the higher gears, & if your are coming from a larger displacement bike it would be more of an adjustment, so to offset the lack of torque in the higher gears it generally increases the need to shift more

http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/ne...s/8890-potential-cb300f-owner-norwalk-ct.html

canyon carving you are more able to keep the speed up through the corners, but twisties is different you are forced to slow down coming into the turn & unless you downshift you will have no torque coming out of the turn, as a workaround for this bike I treat it kind of like a dirt bike track where the rule is no coasting because you are in much more control of the tires to the ground/pavement if you put yourself in a position of twisting the throttle, so left foot, left hand, & right hand are kept busy under these riding conditions & following that riding philosophy

summary: as it relates to this bike in twisties couple of ways to look at it, 1) makes for a very engaging ride as there is a lot going on & you will not be bored, or 2) if you want a more relaxing ride just take a different route if possible, & don't forget the op pretty much stated it- if he had been on a heavier bike it likely would have ended up in the ditch

keep the ego's in check we tend to do better for this subject on the front end of the ride vs the tail end of the the ride or you get tired & sloppy toward the tail end of the ride, anyway whatever it takes to keep the two wheels down

ride safe
 

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I wore steel-toed work boots to my MSF course. I was leaning one of their CBR125's over in a tight turn, and I was keeping my foot under the shift lever. Next thing I know, my ankle touches the ground and twists pretty hard, it jerked the bike a little while I was leaning. Luckily it is a sturdy work boot so it kept my ankle from twisting to a sprain. It jolted my senses but I was able to stay calm and pull my foot out and keep going without issues.

It was a huge wake-up call and I've put my foot there a few too many times since then. I keep correcting myself when I do it. But in my defense I got some really glove-like Alpine Stars boots so they're like slippers compared to huge boots. Far less likely to get caught between the ground and the bike.
 
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