Honda CBR 300 Forum banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Now that's a cool find! (Thumbs up)
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikal

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
Found this on Ebay. It's aluminum and must be a big weight savings over that monster steel stock yoke! Comes in red and black. Says it's for the 250r but I cross referenced the part #'s for the 250r and 300r and it's the same part #.
@kiwi rider what do you think about this weight savings? Unfortunately I don't see an aluminum lower to match :(
Honda CBR 250 R 2011 2014 Top Clamp Upper Triple Tree Red UTTMA20 Eng | eBay
The stock triple clamp is cast aluminum, not steel. The one in the ebay link, although it doesn't specify in the listing, is likely made from billet aluminum. http://info.cpm-industries.com/blog/bid/283266/Cast-vs-Billet

Given that the seller doesn't claim a weight savings over the stock part, one can probably assume that any weight difference is minimal. Of course being that it is red anodized, and has the CBR logo engraved gives it all kinds of bling appeal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CDNHONDAR and mikal

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Hmm interesting stuff. I wonder what the weight savings would be. I don't know much about motorcycle suspensions but when I worked in automotive engineering we used thin steel instead of thick aluminum even on some higher end stuff in order to minimize deflection. You have to use much thicker aluminum to get the same amount of stiffness as a steel part, even if the aluminum is 7075 (strong but not as stiff). I assume the trade-off is worth it on larger super-sports where there is space to have thick aluminum and the budget to use something like 6061 or better, but if it is a copy of the steel part on our bike I would be worried that the deflection would be higher with the aluminum compared to the steel (assuming no design changes).

EDIT: Oops posted before Mike pointed out it is already aluminum, unless it is a higher grade aluminum I wouldn't expect them to be able to drop a noticeable amount of weight. At that price I doubt it is.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikal

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The stock triple clamp is cast aluminum, not steel. The one in the ebay link, although it doesn't specify in the listing, is likely made from billet aluminum.

Given that the seller doesn't claim a weight savings over the stock part, one can probably assume that any weight difference is minimal. Of course being that it is red anodized, and has the CBR logo engraved gives it all kinds of bling appeal.
Oh thanks. Had no idea Honda would use aluminum there on such an entry level bike.
Yah the bling appeal is what caught my attention! lol
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,502 Posts
Mike has pretty much covered what I was going to say. It def looks more sporty/styley than the standard one but not enough for me to spend $125US.
You can get a set of grab handle deletes for less!
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikal

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Mike has pretty much covered what I was going to say. It def looks more sporty/styley than the standard one but not enough for me to spend $125US.
You can get a set of grab handle deletes for less!
haha..tough call for me. I'll probably end up getting both at some time in the future
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Tyga makes a similar product. There isn't much weight savings but the location of the pinch bolts means you can run clip-ons under the triple if you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Tyga makes a similar product. There isn't much weight savings but the location of the pinch bolts means you can run clip-ons under the triple if you want.
I don't like the TYGA version. I like the red anodized color because my whole front end accessories are the same red anodized color. I've pretty much stripped everything off that I can already except for the passenger handles. I took them off but didn't like the empty space. I'll end up getting the deletes and painting them eventually but right now it just erks me the price the guy is charging. I was hoping someone else would come out with some soon for cheaper
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
It really is a decent price. It's CNC aluminum. I just wish they had a matching lower tree
CNC just means that the machining center used to make the part has a Computer Numerical Control... it has nothing to do with the type of material used to make a part.

In this photo, the CNC is hanging off the boom on the right side of the machine...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
CNC is primarily a means to reduce costs. In conventional 'manual' machining the operator must work out where to take metal away and how much, himself, by constantly consulting a drawing, and select the appropriate tool (drill bit for instance) for each step. With CNC a programmer makes a computer program from a 3D Computer Aided Drawing (CAD) system, uploads it into the machine, and then the machine is left to do the rest. The required selection of tools (drills and cutters) are pre-loaded into a carousel and the machine might drill a hole, put the drill bit back into the carousel, select a larger drill and then drill some other holes. Then it might pick up a cutter and mill away some material to create a flat surface. When the machine also has self-loading material capabilities, those things can spit out fairly complex components really rapidly. I've seen one, which was making simple parts, spit them out like a machine gun.

One of the advantages, when making multiple identical components, is consistency. Manual operation means that each piece is slightly different, though very skilled machinists are pretty consistent. There are fewer opportunities for human error, especially once the program is made, the required tools inserted and the material loaded. Five-axis machines are fascinating to watch as they perform their high-speed gymnastics.

Very sophisticated CNC machines can detect wear on tools and compensate, also they can measure temperature and compensate for that, too (to allow for expansion and contraction at vary temps). Of course, this is only important when working at very fine tolerances.

CNC or automated manufacture is a key factor in the steady reduction of the cost of cars and bikes, which in real terms, have never been lower. I'm guessing that a good CNC machining centre could make one of those triple clamps in a couple of minutes, assuming it started with a blank that wasn't too much bigger than the finished article.

There used to be a sort of 'halfway house' version, where the operator basically typed in the instructions on a control panel and then left the machine to make the part. I don't know if these still exist - I haven't been involved in manufacturing for many years.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MotoMike

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
CNC just means that the machining center used to make the part has a Computer Numerical Control... it has nothing to do with the type of material used to make a part.

In this photo, the CNC is hanging off the boom on the right side of the machine...
thanks mike..I knew that. I wasn't saying it's a kind of 'aluminum'. I know what CNC is. Almost every single aftermarket part on my bike is CNC'd
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
^ My misunderstanding. Having worked in the industry (R&D) I'm just use to hearing & using the term machined to describe how a part was made... can't say that I've ever heard the term "CNC'd" used as a verb. Regardless whether a part is made using an old Bridgeport manual knee mill, one with a NC (Numeric Control), or one equipped with a CNC, it's still universally known as a machined part. CNC is just the latest modern way to operate/control a machine tool... it doesn't describe the actual process of a machine tool cutting metal.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikal

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
^ My misunderstanding. Having worked in the industry (R&D) I'm just use to hearing & using the term machined to describe how a part was made... can't say that I've ever heard the term "CNC'd" used as a verb. Regardless whether a part is made using an old Bridgeport manual knee mill, one with a NC (Numeric Control), or one equipped with a CNC, it's still universally known as a machined part. CNC is just the latest modern way to operate/control a machine tool... it doesn't describe the actual process of a machine tool cutting metal.
OK I see where you are coming from. I'm a politics professor lol. When I think of CNC I think of the actual machine taking a chunk of aluminum billet or whatever and how the piece is made.
I know what a CNC part is but I may not know the actual terminology well
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top