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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought some Barkbuster BBZ hand guards.
I can install them 2 ways:
A) remove the handlebar weights, both external and internal. Then mount the barkbuster like any regular hollow handle. This will not allow the bar end weights to be used as they are 6mm threaded and the hollow bar kit is all 8mm bolts.
pros: hand guards will not turn around.
cons: no more bar weights, so more vibrations.

B) keep the handle bar weights, but find a way to stop them from turning.
pros: keep weights, so max vibrations reduction
cons: need to modify something to stop the turning.

For B), I plan to remove the bar weights (inside and outside), see what allows the rotation. Then see if I can use some epoxy, or maybe even brazing something (soldering) to stop the weightsfrom rotating. I would then put the weights inside the handle, and still use the outside weights.

I couldn't find anyone on internet who would have done that before. Is this crazy thought?

Thx
 

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I would just remove your bar end weights and fit then regular style. I removed my bar end weights when I fitted my aluminium clip ons and bar end mirror. If there was an increase in vibration it was slight and I definitely don't notice it now.
 

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I would just remove your bar end weights and fit then regular style. I removed my bar end weights when I fitted my aluminium clip ons and bar end mirror. If there was an increase in vibration it was slight and I definitely don't notice it now.

So I take it that your hand(s) do not go numb long long rides..now that bar-ends are gone?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys. While I'll look into buying some aftermarket bar weights (8MM thread this time), I want to avoid spending too much money in this, and I want to be able to remove the hand guards in summer (and when I will sell the bike).
So I'm also thinking about maybe putting some "silicon caulk" into the end of the handle.
i.e. unscrew a little the current hand guard, squeeze the silicon stuff in, screw everything tight, and let it cure for 1 day.
This should be vibration resistant, and easy to remove in the future. i.e. hand tools are enough to unscrew, and a screwdriver end can be used to scrape what is inside the handle between the open end and the inside weight.

What do you think?

silicon: I'm thinking the construction stuff you can use to put around a bath tub, things like that. I've plenty at home.

Note: This week-end I've plenty of work to do on the bike: bleed the rear brakes, fix the handguards, install Denali DM lights on the front fender, and wash and re-waterproof my jacket/pants.
 

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So I take it that your hand(s) do not go numb long long rides..now that bar-ends are gone?
Ive always had trouble with numbness and pain from broken wrists as an active child, so I was getting that already before swapping the bars.

Over the years I have developed a technique where i can ride the bike with my left hand on the throttle to give my right hand a break. Not recommending this tho!
 

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... So I'm also thinking about maybe putting some "silicon caulk" into the end of the handle.
i.e. unscrew a little the current hand guard, squeeze the silicon stuff in, screw everything tight, and let it cure for 1 day.
This should be vibration resistant, and easy to remove in the future. i.e. hand tools are enough to unscrew, and a screwdriver end can be used to scrape what is inside the handle between the open end and the inside weight.

What do you think?

silicon: I'm thinking the construction stuff you can use to put around a bath tub, things like that. I've plenty at home...
Silicon caulking won't do anything as far as reducing handle bar vibrations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Update: I eventually decided to get rid of the internal bar weight (and bar end weight too), in order to set the barkbuster properly (mounting for a hollow handlebar).
While this took longer than originally planned, I'll now have to see what the result is.
If needed, I'll get some 8mm (hole size) handlebar weight to fit between the handlebar and the barkbuster metal piece.
Left handle: I used my air compressor to "lift" the grip and remove it. I was then able to push the 2 tabs letting me pull the inside weight. Note to self: I Should buy some handle grip glue.
Right handle: I had to unscrew the front brake (got some help to keep it level to not suck some air bubles), then uncsrewed the electric switches assembly, moved it towards the bike center to expose the 2 holes to push the tabs. I was then able to pull away the inside weights. One part had some rust on it :-( for a bike that is always parked, and quite new, that was a little surprising. (I do ride in the rain, so I'm assuming that with the wheel locked, the right hand bar is going to collect the water inside, instead of draining like the left side would do.

The lights install (Denali DM) on the fender was relatively easy. I feared having to move the tank a little to route the wires, but I was able to route them on each side under the "black" fairing. (I've a red CBR, so the black part is the side fairing on the sides of the gas tank). That was a good opportunity to see more of the bike. I wish Denali (and the battery tender brand I use) used some tiny size fuses like we have on the bike instead of big automobile size fuses, as I now have to carry 2 sizes for spares.

The rear brake bleeding was easy and I now have a much "stiff" brake pedal. I did test the ABS on the rear wheel and it performed well. (straight line on a dead end road, no traffic). I've yet to get the front ABS to engage. I find the bike braking very well, so I guess I chicken out before the ABS would have to get into action.

I also dropped my bike for the first time (with the fairing off, in my garage). No damage, the slider doesn't even show a scratch. That was a slow motion crash, me fighting a little with the left fairing to put it into place, and the bike falling over the right side. I practiced how to bring the bike back up firs the firs time (I did watch many videos before). The technique worked great, not having to use my "wimpy arms" :) Note to self: when the bike is not on the right stand anymore, I should be much more gentle/careful.
 

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I bought some Barkbuster BBZ hand guards.
I can install them 2 ways:
A) remove the handlebar weights, both external and internal. Then mount the barkbuster like any regular hollow handle. This will not allow the bar end weights to be used as they are 6mm threaded and the hollow bar kit is all 8mm bolts.
pros: hand guards will not turn around.
cons: no more bar weights, so more vibrations.

B) keep the handle bar weights, but find a way to stop them from turning.
pros: keep weights, so max vibrations reduction
cons: need to modify something to stop the turning.

For B), I plan to remove the bar weights (inside and outside), see what allows the rotation. Then see if I can use some epoxy, or maybe even brazing something (soldering) to stop the weightsfrom rotating. I would then put the weights inside the handle, and still use the outside weights.

I couldn't find anyone on internet who would have done that before. Is this crazy thought?

Thx
It's the Honda design that allows the ends of the weight to spin. It's not a flaw and it's not a problem. You will only have problems if you install a lighter weight bar end or remove the internal weight.

If your intention is to replace them to install a hand guard or whatever then go ahead knowing that you will have more vibration as a result. Otherwise why are you intent on stopping them from spinning?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I knew the spinning was by design on Honda motorcycles (I guess to help limit damage when crashing?).
My goal was to prevent the spinning to happen otherwise the handguard ends up spinning. Ideally keeping the wights in place to keep vibration lower.

As a report: so far the vibrations do not seem higher. Time will tell :)
 

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I knew the spinning was by design on Honda motorcycles (I guess to help limit damage when crashing?).
My goal was to prevent the spinning to happen otherwise the handguard ends up spinning. Ideally keeping the wights in place to keep vibration lower.

As a report: so far the vibrations do not seem higher. Time will tell :)
It shouldn't change with time. You've done the mod, you know straight away what you've got.
I don't know why Honda puts such heavy vibration absorbers in there, the amount of vibration you get with them removed seems fine.
 

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.....I don't know why Honda puts such heavy vibration absorbers in there, the amount of vibration you get with them removed seems fine.
None of the bikes I've owned felt bad in this respect, in my opinion, including some that were supposedly notorious for vibration, so maybe this is more about satisfying those of us who are sensitive to vibration?
 
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