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Just rode 4525 km (2811 miles) across Canada from Quebec to British Columbia on my new to me 2015 Honda CB300F. In four days.

July 18

I picked up my bike from James Bergeron on this forum in Ottawa, Ontario. 1948km on it and still under warranty although that warranty would expire in a few days. I figured it was a Honda and didn't bother going for the extended warranty. I had shipped a Shad rack to him which he kindly installed for me for the Shad SH42 top case I had brought along, plus he had purchased the Puig 7655 windscreen the past winter but his plans for the CB300F got sidetracked when he picked up a clearance Victory Octane. He posted an install video on this forum. Picked up a 10 day permit for $23 (purchased a binder of interim insurance before leaving for vacation) and I was on the road.



Rode it to Saint-Francois-du-Lac, Quebec afterwards (135km east of Montreal) to enjoy the rest of the family vacation. The extra vehicle was nice because when extended family arrived the day after, there were eight of us and our rental van only seated seven.



July 24

We left out vacation home at about 9am and I saw my wife and kids off at the Montreal Pierre Elliot Trudeau Airport then set off on my trip back home. It had started to lightly rain in Montreal and was pouring by the time I got to Ottawa.

I made the mistake of not bringing my textile jacket and all weather gloves, not thinking that unlike BC which is dry most of the summer aside from the odd sprinkle, the rest of Canada actually gets periods of considerable rain in the summer. It wasn't a warm rain either, it was freezing cold and I'm the kind of guy who can comfortably ride in -6C weather when properly equipped (no heated gear).



As a result, I took a lot of warm up breaks and only did about 703km that day, checking into the Howard Johnson in North Bay, Ontario. If there were two positives I got out of this day, 1. The bike and stock IRC tires took corners in the wet at a high rate of speed (for a 300) very well, and 2. It made me grateful for the weather for the rest of the ride home.

July 25

SUN! I didn't set my alarm clock the night before as I figured I would let my body get the sleep it needed after freezing my butt off the day before. That magic wake up time was 5:15am EDT, but getting all my gear repacked (hint: turns out my tank bag isn't very waterproof), cleaning and lubing the chain, and getting breakfast (and chatting with a nice couple who were traveling from Vermont to Montana) meant I wasn't on the road til 7.



And I took break. Lots of it. Like a normal person? An hour in Sudbury getting supplies and tea, like a fleece jacket that may have prevented me from freezing the day before. An hour for lunch. I can't remember what I had for dinner. I finished the day in Schreiber, Ontario at 9pm EDT for a total of 937km in 14 hours. Checked into a clean but very outdated Sunset Motel that came with no breakfast and was almost as expensive as the Howard Johnson the night before and it clicked that I don't want to stay in more motels than I need to and have to make way better time. But at least I was good enough to clean and lube the chain before heading to bed. I noticed at this point the chain was out of spec with 40mm of slack.



I have to add though that anyone who claimed Ontario is oversized and a terrible drive was wrong. The scenery was amazing and I enjoyed every minute of it.

July 26

Woke up at about 5:45am but unlike the day before, my bags and top case was packed, chain cleaned and lubed, and fuel tank was full. Wondered if I could make it almost 1500km to Regina? Well first off, morning destination, Thunder Bay to get my chain adjusted at J&J Sports (http://www.jandjsports.ca/) and get a new 10-day permit as the old 10-day permit was set to expire the next day. It was a little chilly and foggy to start but that all quickly burned off when temperatures crept up. Stopped at the Nipigon River Bridge which was a point of interest to me because if this bridge were to ever fail, the only way to drive from the west to the east is through the US. There is no other crossing in Canada.



Before heading to J&J Sports, I went to Tim Horton's to grab a 6 pack of donuts (and myself some breakfast) then brought it in right when they opened at 8:30am hoping they could find time in their busy schedule to help me. The service staff didn't, but a sales associate and the parts guy did. 5 minutes, no charge, they appreciated the donuts, and I gave them a 5 star review everywhere. Another 15 minutes to grab another 10 day permit for $23 and I was off. Had one length delay for a 20km long roadway resurfacing and a bit more for highway twinning, more curvy highway, then an abrupt transition to the prairies as I crossed into Manitoba. Flat, boring, I wish I had cruise control, this is so going to square off my tires prairies. At least it'll be four lane divided highway for the next 1700km. This was about 2pm. It took me over two days to get out of Ontario. I would say I averaged 110-120km/h with a fuel consmption of 4.1 L/100km (57 MPG [US])

Nothing much to say about Manitoba. Lots of traffic and traffic lights on the Winnipeg ring road. Gas was cheap. I felt like I was closer to home. Did a quick check on the chain, still seemed to be in spec. Checked oil, it was at the low mark so I added about a couple hundred mL to get it to the high mark. Checked the tires, uh oh starting to square off. I decided to call a Calgary dealer to give them heads up that I might need a tire tomorrow. Then I called a hostel in Regina to give the heads up that I was coming. Uh oh, I'm committed. Got through the province in about 5 hours then bombed through Saskatchewan where I would make it to Regina at 9:15pm Central Standard Time (Saskatchewan doesn't observe daylight saving time) so with Regina 2 hours behind Schreiber, I was on the road for 17 hours. Checking into the hotel, I was going to go for a $60 private room but the host said she could put me in my own dorm room with no one else for $30. Cool, I like saving money. I was exhausted but rode to get some groceries, found that Regina was actually pretty hip, made myself some instant noodles in the hostel kitchen, and wondered with close to 1400 km left to go, would I want to iron butt it again the next day? Ugh, too tired, need sleep.

July 27

I was up at 2 and was scared I wouldn't go back to sleep. Thankfully I did lol. Woke up at 4:30 and decided I was good for a long ride. Fried some eggs in the kitchen (I love hostels), cleaned and lubed my chain (seriously how often do I need to do this? Rhetorical question), got tea and gas, and set off on my journey at about 5:45. Riding south out of downtown, I was amazed at the beautiful well kept old houses. It reminded me of Granville Ave in Vancouver. I'd definitely like to explore more of Regina next time I do a drive across, probably with my wife and kids.

Bombed through the rest of Saskatchewan with a couple of gas stops and got to Walsh Alberta at 8:51am MDT. My next stop after that was Brooks for early lunch at McD's (not very healthy, I know) where I would order two junior chickens and two apple pies, one for now and one for later. I noticed a number of traditional dressed Mormons at the McDonald's. Interesting but I was in an area that was considered Canada's Utah. Next stop would be Calgary. Saw signs for Drumheller on the way and man that's another place I want to take my kids. Ended up in west Calgary via their ring road that is a fully developed freeway where I stopped for gas. I sure gassed up often through the prairies, every 205km on average compared to 242km through Ontario. Doing 120-130 km/h really took its toll on fuel consumption at 4.6 L/100km (51 MPG [US]).

But with the prairies over and I was making good time, I thought I'd slow down as I headed towards the Rocky Mountains and BC. Did my last stop in Lake Louise for a bit of a premature fuel up where I only put 6.6 L in -- I probably would've made it to Golden but I wanted a break. If it wasn't gas, it was my butt which wished I got an Airhawk seat at that point. Had my second apple pie as well as a bit of a snack. Entered BC a short time later only to be hit with construction delays in Yoho National Park where they are twinning the highways. And unfortunately because of all the construction, all the vehicles ended up being clustered altogether so I was unable to have fun on the twisties through to Golden. Needless to say, I was disappointed.

Traffic did open up enough a few tmes that I was able to get some speed and have some fun I noticed I was being shadowed by a truck that was able to take turns almost as fast as I was, not tailgating at all just keeping up with me. We hit a bit more traffic and I decided to resign to taking it easy, letting the truck pass and getting a nod of approval from the both the driver and passenger. Traffic cleared when we hit the four lane section of Kicking Horse Pass heading down to Golden but I continued to take it easy past Golden knowing that even though we did pass the most treacherous part of the highway into what should be an easier stretch of highway, we were entering a section known for fatal accidents. Pretty much two lanes to Revelstoke with passing opportunities up hills. Got Revelstoke for my final fuel up of the trip for the home stretch and ate my second junior chicken burger. I really didn't eat much during the trip, eating takes away from riding time.

Turning off to Hwy 97A in Sicamous for my final stretch into the Okanagan valley. I forgot to mention it was pretty hot all day and between the heat and bum rash I acquired, I was ready to get home. Final 110km stretch. Roads were still twisty up to Armstrong but again lots of traffic. The road finally opened up to two lanes in each direction and I was inching closer to home through now familiar territory. I did take my old 125cc scooter up here several times, 60km from home, and the 300 is more than capable of doing this trip. Definitely enjoyed being able to cruise 10 above the speed limit the entire way unlike the scooter. A couple of turns off the highway and I see my home, and my lovely wife and kids who have been tracking my progress on GPS greeting me on the driveway. 8 pm PDT, 15 hours and 1390km and I'm home!

Total trip 4525km (2811 miles) over 56 hours of riding, including breaks. About $200 spent in fuel and approximately 184L (48.7 US Gallons) for a trip average of 4.1 L/100km (57 MPG US) plus $189 in hotels and three additional vacation days = purely from a cost perspective, I would've been better off flying. But it was a trip of a lifetime and I would do it again in a heartbeat. Although it'll be with my wife, spread out to no more than 8 hours a day of riding.

Oh yea, and my tires survived the trip. Should be good for another couple thousand km.



I've only put 372 km on my CB300F since getting home a couple of weeks ago mostly from commuting with a few just because rides, but I've put 5531 km on it so far 6 days shy off a month of ownership. Not that I have any plans to put insane kilometres on this little bike ever again. It feels right at home commuting and carving corners.



Thanks for reading!
 

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!! I saw some these pictures on Facebook, hadn't made the connection until now that it's you :)
Sounds like a really fun trip, I would love to do a trip like that if I could only have some time off...
Glad you are back safe! Hope to meet you one of these days if we're up around your city.
 

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Madness. I really wouldn't enjoy that at all.

Each to their own though and 10/10 for the report. I'm considering BC for our next overseas trip.
 

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Great report and a top effort. 1400km in a day is huge and to do it twice in a row is something else.

You can get an easy 10,000km out of the road winners no worries there. I got 13K out of my rear.
Did you have a 15T sprocket on the front. If not then how did you find the amount of revs/vibration?
Sometimes at the end of a long day in the saddle the last thing you want to do is chain maintenance eh. I guess this is where a shaft drive bike is good.
Well done, you have proved that you do indeed have an iron butt! :D
 

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Wow, awesome trip report! I can't imagine riding all day in the pouring rain (or all day period!) - good on you for sticking with your plans despite the weather and other set backs. As Kiwi queried, how was the vibration on the bike during those long days? I also have a CB300f and after about an hour of riding I'm starting to feel it in my hands/wrists.

P.S. I'm absolutely loving the look of the CB300F in white, I mainly see red and black. Is that stock?
 

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Great report Dkazzed.
Curious about you're mileage though, my CBR300R usually gets between 3.2-3.5l/100km depending how much I push her.
Given I've never done that sort of distance on the same day, usually between 250-400km and mine is fully fared.
I regularly do 300km on a tank and then only put 10lts or so in (fuel bar is flashing at that point, way too soon seems to me).
My cruising speed is about 105-115km on my rides.
I've got do a cross country tour one of these days and love to see your part of the country.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
!! I saw some these pictures on Facebook, hadn't made the connection until now that it's you

Sounds like a really fun trip, I would love to do a trip like that if I could only have some time off...
Glad you are back safe! Hope to meet you one of these days if we're up around your city.
Thanks! Which group are you in? You're in Vancouver I assume, I'm down that way every once in awhile although maybe with my bike (or any bike) once a year.

Madness. I really wouldn't enjoy that at all.

Each to their own though and 10/10 for the report. I'm considering BC for our next overseas trip.
Thanks! It's beautiful here but I also loved Quebec and Ontario. I only did the trip so quick to 1. Get home to my family sooner 2. Minimize staying in motels not just because of the cost but I'm not a huge fan of staying in them alone.

Great report and a top effort. 1400km in a day is huge and to do it twice in a row is something else.

You can get an easy 10,000km out of the road winners no worries there. I got 13K out of my rear.
Did you have a 15T sprocket on the front. If not then how did you find the amount of revs/vibration?
Sometimes at the end of a long day in the saddle the last thing you want to do is chain maintenance eh. I guess this is where a shaft drive bike is good.
Well done, you have proved that you do indeed have an iron butt!
Thanks! It was a lot of ground to cover in a day for sure. I was considering going an extra tooth in the front but I didn't want to modify the bike on vacation. It's odd that I start feeling the vibrations an hour in but then another hour later I stop noticing the vibrations for the rest of the day. I did have cramp busters on the throttle.

Shaft or belt drive would definitely be nice for these long trips but the long trip was a once in the next five years sort of deal so the chain is good for me!

Wow, awesome trip report! I can't imagine riding all day in the pouring rain (or all day period!) - good on you for sticking with your plans despite the weather and other set backs. As Kiwi queried, how was the vibration on the bike during those long days? I also have a CB300f and after about an hour of riding I'm starting to feel it in my hands/wrists.

P.S. I'm absolutely loving the look of the CB300F in white, I mainly see red and black. Is that stock?
Thanks! I was considering retiring early but decided to trudge on another 200km to at least make some progress. White was the 2015 colour in Canada, my second favourite colour behind mat crypton silver metallic they have this year on both sides of the border.



Great report Dkazzed.
Curious about you're mileage though, my CBR300R usually gets between 3.2-3.5l/100km depending how much I push her.
Given I've never done that sort of distance on the same day, usually between 250-400km and mine is fully fared.
I regularly do 300km on a tank and then only put 10lts or so in (fuel bar is flashing at that point, way too soon seems to me).
My cruising speed is about 105-115km on my rides.
I've got do a cross country tour one of these days and love to see your part of the country.
Thanks! I'm a big guy (185cm/110kg, 6'-1"/235 lb), the naked bike is less aerodynamic plus the top box makes things worse although windshield should've countered that, plus I'm quoting GPS verified speeds which is 10% faster than indicated speed. Ie if I said I was doing 120-130, the speedometer was indicating 132-146. I'm averaging about 3.5 L/100km commuting/having fun mixed city/highway. I do miss my old CBR 125R which did 2.9 L/100km commuting on mixed freeway/city.

But yes I highly recommend doing the trip at least once in your life. The final 600km was stunning.



Epic Ride! Bravo
Thanks!
 

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Oh man! The CBR125, I had a 2011 and loved it.
After the recall last year I really started to regret selling it.
I had a Performance Pack installed that was made by a guy in BC, it worked like a charm.
Miss the bike and the mileage but 300 has the torque and hp that was missing on 125.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Oh man! The CBR125, I had a 2011 and loved it.
After the recall last year I really started to regret selling it.
I had a Performance Pack installed that was made by a guy in BC, it worked like a charm.
Miss the bike and the mileage but 300 has the torque and hp that was missing on 125.
I loved my old 125 too! Especially the HRC tri colour livery. That bike was so fun. But yea I like the power and ABS brakes of my bike. I do wonder if I would've been happier with a CBR 300R with the tri colour scheme?

My old CBR 125R side by side with a 2015 CBR 300R



Seriously though, how stunning was that colour scheme?

 

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Great report, for sure. I have to agree with JNO - to me it sounds like madness :) Though if the rider's body can handle the stress, why not...
TransCanada Highway through Ontario is fairly nice, as in "scenic", even though after Thunder Bay it's a straight road. It's just a slow road, with an only 80 kph speed limit (though almost nobody observes it).
I also find southern Manitoba dull. Saskatchewan is fairly bare, but at least somewhat hilly.
I thin Yellowhead is a more picturesque road than TransCanada Highway.


BTW, when you went to sleep, was the screaming engine still roaring in your head?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I just didn't want to spend more nights alone at a motel away from my family then I had too. Loved the riding otherwise.

Hwy 11 out of Thunder Bay may have been more scenic but I decided to take Hwy 17 for time's sake.

I didn't hear the engine in bed but I definitely felt the vibrations. Lol. And I observed after hours on the bike that it sounds like I'm riding a lawnmower. This is with ear plugs which attenuated the wind noise enough that I could hear the engine, also attenuated.
 

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Cool - I thought my CB500x cross country in 2019 was agressive tho now I own a CB300F I realize it would be doable. Likely did not need the buddy seat bag. the 23L side cases were woderful.

more here

BTW - I flew the bike to Calgary ...rode around BC for 10 days the rode home with a tailwind. I was 71 at the time.

Wanted to ask OP exactly what mounting kit and Shad top case.
 
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I also have a CB300f and after about an hour of riding I'm starting to feel it in my hands/wrists.
Grip Buddies ( not puppies ), throttle lock and cramp busters on both sides really help wrist issues and vibration.

Also 1" up and back risers takes some pressure off.
Zeta 7/8 Universal +26mm Handlebar Riser Kit 20mm Offset

ZETA 7 / 8" UNIVERSAL +26MM HANDLEBAR RISER KIT 20MM OFFSET
 
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