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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all, new to the forum and brand new rider. Just finished an intro/basics class and I practice a bit on a friend's dirt bike, but I am still far from road-ready. Currently gearing up for my gov-approved safety course & license test.

From everything I've read it seems like the 300F is the perfect beginner bike, especially considering that this will primarily be for city riding & commuting (I live in Toronto, Canada). That said, I'll also be taking it outside the city from time to time to visit my small town friends and make them jealous, which means freeway and highway riding.

Just wanted to get your opinion on if this bike is the right call, or if I should shift up to the 500F (as it seems many people grapple with).

When riding around the city, of course the lighter weight and handling of the 300F is a plus, but Toronto is known for some pretty rough stretches of road due to winter damage. Would the added stability of the 500 keep me safer on the bumps?

I'm 5'11, 180 pounds, 32" waist. Also a bit concerned the 300F is a little short for me?

Thx for reading!
 

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I live in the NYC area, and the roads are utter crap with potholes everywhere from a combination of winter damage and inadequate funding. The bike is plenty stable IMO. I try and using the quick handling nature of the bike and avoid the potholes all together--if possible.

As you pointed out, the 300F is great in cities and adequate for freeways. If you plan on riding mostly freeways, outside of when you are commuting around Toronto, I would say go for the 500X (which is perfectly suited for the city as well).

I find freeways boring and I avoid them as much as possible. I am lucky that there are some fun twisties not too far away for when I'm not rocking the around the urban areas. For these purposes, the 300F excels.
 

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I'm mostly within the city as well. I agree that city roads ere more fun compared to taking the highway. With this said, the 300 can handle highways very well. So don't worry.

From what I've discovered, the 300 does 90% of what the 500 can do... Saving some coin doesn't hurt either.

Sit on both and try them out. Go for the one that floats your boat.

Good luck, partner.
 
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i have close to 200k miles in over 20 years of riding...85k of those on the ninja 250s and the rest on 600s....

i test rode the 300f for 20 minutes and i am telling you that the 300 is the perfect city bike...so light and flickable...this bike is all you need..even more than fast enough on the freeway....it was such a hoot wringing its neck that i thought about buying one but the wife will not like me having three bikes...lol...

here is a video of a guy weighing 210 lbs. riding around town and on the freeway...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOpCjVDZRuE

just dew eeeet...
 

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Hey all, new to the forum and brand new rider. Just finished an intro/basics class and I practice a bit on a friend's dirt bike, but I am still far from road-ready. Currently gearing up for my gov-approved safety course & license test.

From everything I've read it seems like the 300F is the perfect beginner bike, especially considering that this will primarily be for city riding & commuting (I live in Toronto, Canada). That said, I'll also be taking it outside the city from time to time to visit my small town friends and make them jealous, which means freeway and highway riding.

Just wanted to get your opinion on if this bike is the right call, or if I should shift up to the 500F (as it seems many people grapple with).

When riding around the city, of course the lighter weight and handling of the 300F is a plus, but Toronto is known for some pretty rough stretches of road due to winter damage. Would the added stability of the 500 keep me safer on the bumps?

I'm 5'11, 180 pounds, 32" waist. Also a bit concerned the 300F is a little short for me?

Thx for reading!
Don't get the 300, definitely go with the 500, you will have much more power and room to grow into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks all. Yup, definitely just need to sit on both and see what feels right.

I don't see myself riding all that fast, ever really. So power is less important to me than comfort, control, and straight up fun factor. 'Course, I'll probably feel differently as I get more experienced.

That video is awesome; also have to say I'm not sure about that lane splitting though, lol.
 

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Don't get the 300, definitely go with the 500, you will have much more power and room to grow into it.
If you were to look at the 500 forums, you would read the same crap about the 500s. That you should buy a _____ cc bike because you will quickly outgrow the 500. The 500's aren't a big step up in any way--even if they are better suited for certain kinds of riding.

Buying a bike is not always about power. There are other factors such as cost of ownership, end-use, location, and budget that come into play. It is not unlike buying a car.
 

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I agree with Coast. Know the purpose use of the motorcycle you are planning to buy. I do live in Jasper A.B. and my 300f does well here in the mountains.

●budget and cost of ownership.

●the time you can spend riding the motorcycle. (I've learned here in Canada people buying very fast and expensive motorcycle but in reality they dont have the time to ride it which end up selling their motorcycle)

●maintenance.

●insurance.

Good luck with your purchase.
 

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If you were to look at the 500 forums, you would read the same crap about the 500s. That you should buy a _____ cc bike because you will quickly outgrow the 500. The 500's aren't a big step up in any way--even if they are better suited for certain kinds of riding.

Buying a bike is not always about power. There are other factors such as cost of ownership, end-use, location, and budget that come into play. It is not unlike buying a car.
You say its not about power until you are craving for some more HP, acceleration, and passing ability...The 500 will give you much more room to grow and lesson the chance you will desire significant more power in a short time frame.
 

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Oh dear, this thread has become another 'I'm bored with the power of the 300' thread...

Derek are you trolling this one??

Power is so subjective to the individual rider. One mans speed machine is another mans gutless wonder and the two will probably never agree...
 

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You say its not about power until you are craving for some more HP, acceleration, and passing ability...The 500 will give you much more room to grow and lesson the chance you will desire significant more power in a short time frame.
The 500 (for it's engine design) is still a small bike that was purposely designed to meet the specs of EU regulations for new riders. In the overall scope of things, if your really advocating buying something bigger, a 650 would be a better option. Gives more power while retaining a more 'standard' feel than the 600 super sports are missing because of their design and intended purpose.

Then again, those of us that have been around know that and don't blindly lead people to bikes just because we can. There's not a single person that gets on a motorcycle that doesn't have the desire to go fast, but for most of us that initial desire is over come with the realization that honing ones riding skill is a much more rewarding pursuit that simply hanging on to the handle bars and hoping the bike can over come lack of said skill. It seems like you still have a lot of experience to gain, or maybe you are just trolling. Most of the responses I see from you are vague or blatant insults and random 'facts' pulled out of the air to start an argument. Then again, maybe I'm just reading your words as they are written because this is the internet where subtlety and sarcasm don't show to well.
 

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Yes, it is hard to beat the CB300F as a street bike. The light weight and low seat ht. are what works best for me. It's fast enough too for the highway although you may not want to just hang out in the passing lane. Like I say, a guy really needs more than one bike though. Here are my bikes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzkuZjJ6_sk
 

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Nice one, really interesting to see your garage and put a voice to your words we see on here.
Love the new edition. :)
 

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I've been rocking the 300F this year on 70/30 city/freeway miles. I'm a new rider but I'm still not bored with the power of the 300 (and I don't expect to be!). There are times where it would be nice to have a 600, and maybe in the future I will, but I doubt I'll get rid of my 300. Great bike!
 

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You say its not about power until you are craving for some more HP, acceleration, and passing ability...The 500 will give you much more room to grow and lesson the chance you will desire significant more power in a short time frame.
been riding 250s since 2001 so i've been on the job for about 14 years and have no desire for more power , does your comment apply to everybody ? maybe not :nerd:
 

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Here's an anecdotal story about small bikes: I bought a Grom a year or so ago when they first came out. Nice little bike. Easy to work on, great fun. After I had it a few days I stopped over at AF1 racing and let their mechanics who also race bikes take a spin. They all came back with huge smiles. One of the guys who races the RSV4 Factory even went out and bought one. Small bikes are lots of fun, and since the CB300s are both small and powerful enough for the freeway, that's an added bonus. I also hear they don't rattle any more.
 

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Oh dear, this thread has become another 'I'm bored with the power of the 300' thread...

Derek are you trolling this one??

Power is so subjective to the individual rider. One mans speed machine is another mans gutless wonder and the two will probably never agree...
Gutless wonder? I just did 93 mph today, and the speed limit is 60:devil:. How is that not enough power when I would have gotten a fat juicy ticket if a cop saw me?

Hawaii does have pretty tame speed limits, but I generally find that traffic is congested enough that you won't spend much time above 70 without cutting people off repeatedly at high speeds.
 

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I hate to be pedantic, but there is no such thing as the 'perfect' bike, even for a relatively well-defined role such as city riding. Up to a point, objective measures such as light weight, low-down power, quick steering and low seat height may indicate suitability for city riding, but few of us leave it at that. We also seek subjective qualities that suit our personal needs and desires (which will change over time).

Then, to complicate matters still further, some of us, at certain times of our lives, may want a bike that projects an image that we imagine will impress others. Imagine a person like that trying to buy a bike. Let's call him Derek.

For imaginary Derek, a bike is not a form of transport, nor even simply a bike. It is a projection of our 'self', or rather the 'self' we would like others to think we are. That person might claim to be brave and skilled, able to handle a bike with more power, but sadly stuck on something not so glamorous. So what to do?

One way out is to continue riding the 300 while professing to find it slow and boring. Bingo! "I might ride a small bike but hey, I could ride something bigger and faster if I wanted to!"

Impressed? Me neither.

So let's forget 'Derek'. The OP is asking the right questions and much of the advice here is worth listening to. However, there's only one way to know which is the right bike for you: ride lots of them. If you can't do that (most of us can't) then accept that there is no 'perfect' bike. Or is there?

In fact there is - it's the bike under your arse right now. I'd rather be riding a 100cc commuter than no bike at all and I suspect most real bikers would feel the same. And, having ridden bikes from 70cc to 1500cc I can assure you, size and power alone mean nothing in the fun stakes.
 

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I'm still kind of wondering why I have to impress someone I don't know nor care about. A surefire way to bite off more than you can chew would be to ride a bigger bike than you can handle in an attempt to impress strangers or passing chicks.

Me? I like to be sure I can pick my own bike off the ground in case I ever drop it. Given that I broke my left leg last year, that's not an easy task.

That aside, money is still a factor, and I keep a close eye on how much and how frequently I have to fill up. This bike is very well balanced, can handle the freeways(in Hawaii anyway) well, and gives me excellent fuel economy and travel range on a tank.

I feel like I got a LOT of bang for my buck on this.
 
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