Honda CBR 300 Forum banner

101 - 120 of 155 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
777 Posts
any vehicle moving through air has its resistance increase in a non linear fashion with speed. so 60-65 mph will cost you some extra fuel consumption. 65-70 will cost you more... and full throttle whatever the max your odometer will show, will further reduce the miles per gallons (or increase litters per km) you get.
I get 45-65 US miles per US Gallons (crazy units, I'd love metric system everywhere) doing daily commute of 15 miles, 10 are highway, 5 city. Even highway is partly traffic jam in the morning, but no traffic in the evening (working long days, commute is over by that time). I do not try to manage gas consumption (and I also wear heated gloves and jacket, so putting some real load on the alternator). So about 1H15-1H30 per day. (idling consumes gas, starting stop too...)

I found out that with the blinking gas bar, I do not do 15 miles in these conditions if I have to go up on a steep incline. i.e. flat you can drive long, but go up or down a lot (steep incline to exit the highway), you can run the fuel pump dry. A little shaking the gas around and restarting was possible, but that was the limit for me.
Something as simple as installing a $4 inline fuel filter might work.
At least, it works on my Rebel.
Not only does it keep the dirt out of the EFI(or carburetor), but the little window has enough fuel for the bike to ride a good 15-30 seconds WOT, or 25-40 seconds on normal speeds...
It's a great and affordable option as a fuel buffer!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Is there not a fuel filter already on our EFI bikes? I would think that there is one..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
777 Posts
The Filter on a Honda Rebel is also inside the tank, but over time sometimes the filtering material ends up getting bad.
That's why I installed a small inline fuel filter in the fuel line between the tank and the carburetor.
It could offer an additional supply of fuel for the carburetor. When the tank is nearly empty, it sometimes sucks a bunch of air and could stall when going WOT.
The little fuel stored in the filter glass seems to remedy this situation somewhat.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
The Filter on a Honda Rebel is also inside the tank, but over time sometimes the filtering material ends up getting bad.
That's why I installed a small inline fuel filter in the fuel line between the tank and the carburetor.
It could offer an additional supply of fuel for the carburetor. When the tank is nearly empty, it sometimes sucks a bunch of air and could stall when going WOT.
The little fuel stored in the filter glass seems to remedy this situation somewhat.
The filter on the 250/300R's is attached to the bottom of the the tank on the outside.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
A little late to the thread, but I keep a spreadsheet of all of my commuting costs (to make a better business case for owning a bike :) )

Highest 71.7 mpg
Lowest: 52.7 mpg
Average is 64.5 mpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Don't try to make a business case. You ride because you like riding :)
You could be playing golf or doing any other expensive hobby. Same thing, but you do get some really nice benefits to go places :)

If you also own a car (for shopping...), you negate most of the savings. You pay for the car when you do not use it: insurance, taxes (likely in many places), depreciation, some stuff getting old even when not used (tires, rubber parts), parking (even in your own garage, that's some opportunity for something else unused)...

Note: I do own a car, and I commute to work 9 times out of 10 on the motorcycle, rain or rain (I live in Seattle, WA). But I own a car and do spend a lot in insurance...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
Don't try to make a business case. You ride because you like riding :)...
Exactly.

Some who own these small displacement bikes make a big deal about their MPG's on Fuely, etc. I kind of feel sorry for those hypermiler's who get so caught up in trying to get every last tenth of a mile out of a gallon of gas... IMO, they are completely missing the point of riding a motorcycle.

To me, motorcycling should be about fun and enjoyment, not just an exercise in frugal economics. If the goal is economical "commuter" transport, you might just as well take the bus as it would no doubt be far less costly than owning and maintaining a motorcycle, even these relatively low cost CBR's.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I would disagree that motorcycling is just for fun and enjoyment. I take a motorcycle every chance that I get, so yes it is for fun and enjoyment. I ride anytime its greater than 32degF, but that is far from the only reason.

However economics and fuel mileage was the entire reason that I got the cbr300. My cb750 was my main commuter, but it only gets 40mpg. If I didn't care about fuel mileage I would have gotten a very different bike.

Using the cbr300 will save me around $200 every month in gas money alone from driving.

That being said, I would never try to get every last mpg. I got the cbr as it gets good mileage in general and that is enough. I'm not going to squeak out every last mpg in the expense of fun.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
777 Posts
I would disagree that motorcycling is just for fun and enjoyment. I take a motorcycle every chance that I get, so yes it is for fun and enjoyment. I ride anytime its greater than 32degF, but that is far from the only reason.

However economics and fuel mileage was the entire reason that I got the cbr300. My cb750 was my main commuter, but it only gets 40mpg. If I didn't care about fuel mileage I would have gotten a very different bike.

Using the cbr300 will save me around $200 every month in gas money alone from driving.

That being said, I would never try to get every last mpg. I got the cbr as it gets good mileage in general and that is enough. I'm not going to squeak out every last mpg in the expense of fun.
I also get about 40MPG average, but then again, I go at speeds greater than 80MPH.

I'm sure if I ran the bike at slower speeds, I'd get better mpg.

I had a Honda Shadow VT750 before, and got 55MPG out of that one, average, and a 103MPH top speed.
Their newer Shadow RS versions are smaller, and fuel injected. Can hit 110-120MPH, and have much better fuel economy.

The CBR300R gets best gas mileage between 45-75MPH.
If you want to ride faster (like me), a larger cc bike would be better.
The Rebel 250 performs best between 35-60MPH.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
if you look at a work of art thinking
look at that work of art, you will see
[no prizes for guessing]

if you look at the same thing thinking
look at that piece of canvas, bits of wood
and oil paint, thats what you will see..

if youre frightened of horses, say,
looking at a horse you will see
[yep]
the horse [or the motorcycle] remain
what they are.. the mind of the observer
also remains, within its capacity to see,
beyond inner fears etc, and into potentials..

motorcycle riding or horse riding
or skiing down mountains or [etc etc]
are not for everybody..
thankfully..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Exactly.

Some who own these small displacement bikes make a big deal about their MPG's on Fuely, etc. I kind of feel sorry for those hypermiler's who get so caught up in trying to get every last tenth of a mile out of a gallon of gas... IMO, they are completely missing the point of riding a motorcycle.

To me, motorcycling should be about fun and enjoyment, not just an exercise in frugal economics. If the goal is economical "commuter" transport, you might just as well take the bus as it would no doubt be far less costly than owning and maintaining a motorcycle, even these relatively low cost CBR's.
Me I just ride my bike and drive my car for family trips etc, when the fuel guage gets to last bar I fill them up. Never worry to much on mileage except when misses says the car needs filling up again. I tell her to stop redlining it the turbo kicks in at 1800rpm and don't put it in sports mode, the 7 speed DSG auto gearbox tells you on the dash what gear you are in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
For me motorcycling has always been about....fun...feeling alive....stress relief. With years of working in a very busy Manufacturing plant and dealing with shift work,,,riding my motorcycle gave me a chance to un-wind from my hectic shift and just concentrate the feel of freedom. Nothing beats ability of smelling the trees/flowers even the farms as you leisurely ride buy on a warm sunny day.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
For me motorcycling has always been about....fun...feeling alive....stress relief. With years of working in a very busy Manufacturing plant and dealing with shift work,,,riding my motorcycle gave me a chance to un-wind from my hectic shift and just concentrate the feel of freedom. Nothing beats ability of smelling the trees/flowers even the farms as you leisurely ride buy on a warm sunny day.
Def better than sitting in a pub after work to unwind. I ride my bikes for pure pleasure and the open countryside etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Yes you are right dsimmo...even though there was (is) a local watering hole that my working friends would "visit" I never did. I am not much of a drinker and would rather spend my $$ on bike accessories.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dsimmo

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
Yes you are right dsimmo...even though there was (is) a local watering hole that my working friends would "visit" I never did. I am not much of a drinker and would rather spend my $$ on bike accessories.
Me to, although like a glass of wine when friends or family are round for dinner.
 
  • Like
Reactions: kiwi rider

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Exactly.

Some who own these small displacement bikes make a big deal about their MPG's on Fuely, etc. I kind of feel sorry for those hypermiler's who get so caught up in trying to get every last tenth of a mile out of a gallon of gas... IMO, they are completely missing the point of riding a motorcycle.

To me, motorcycling should be about fun and enjoyment, not just an exercise in frugal economics. If the goal is economical "commuter" transport, you might just as well take the bus as it would no doubt be far less costly than owning and maintaining a motorcycle, even these relatively low cost CBR's.
Although I agree with your sentiment I think in parking and gasoline saved I have almost made up the price of my bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
So over 23000ks ive averaged 31km/l. Its daily commuter. With hwy stretches inbetween hone and work. I dont try and conserve fuel, happy to open it up when the conditions are right.

Technically its 31km+%7/L due to 15t front sprocket tho yeh? Odo would be out if its accurate with stock 14t.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,439 Posts
So over 23000ks ive averaged 31km/l. Its daily commuter. With hwy stretches inbetween hone and work. I dont try and conserve fuel, happy to open it up when the conditions are right.

Technically its 31km+%7/L due to 15t front sprocket tho yeh? Odo would be out if its accurate with stock 14t.
Yeah you will have actually done 7% more K's than your odo reads so your fuel consumption figures are slightly lower than actual. 31km/l + is pretty good tho eh.
 
101 - 120 of 155 Posts
Top