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Hey, i bought my first ever bike last week! As of right now i am just parking lot riding until i get my m-class. I can't wait to fully get out there!!
 

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Welcome to our little sport in the World. I purchased the same looking bike as you.....( 2 weeks ago)...love the color.
 
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welcome..

riding your parking lot, esp now,
is or can be one of he most valuable
and even enjoyable experiences
on your new motorcycle..

its not 'just' riding the parking lot tho..
anything and everything you do there and now,
can be and will effect your developing riding skills..
think of it as a challenge..

seems silly thinking of slowly riding a parking lot
as important, compared to everything else to come..
and yet, there is no doubt that slow riding is
one of the best skills your can develop,
and now is the best time to do it...

novices statistically everywhere drop their bikes
during this novice phase.. why is this so..
and what is it that riding a parking lot, can do
to actually develop skills relevant to riding ?
[and not dropping your motorcycle!]

from walking as infants to riding a pushbike
and so on, we contact and thus develop
our balance mechanism, creating pathways
in the brain sensitive to our center of gravity..

one of the best skills you can develop for every day
riding in traffic etc and especially approaching lights
and other slow or stopped situations, is the slow ride..
ie, down to slow walking pace.. in control..
feet on their footpegs, relaxed, not,, falling..

the related skill again handy in everyday riding
is the slow turn, especially tight turning slowly..
when you are still leaned over, enough for gravity
to have effect, yet are turning a tight enough
circle, it is vital to have developed that skill
to the extent of it being like doing the same
thing walking..

this is why riding courses and novice testing worldwide
in unrelated societies include slow riding and circling..
it seems at first to the inexperienced novice to be
irrelevant to the main game - getting out there
on he road, riding that motorcycle..
and yet it is as important as the unseen
foundation for every wall and every
building that has stood for hundreds
of years.. you riding foundation..

so as part of your other practicing [gears, braking etc]
be sure to set slow riding goals, including circling..
you should be able to ride very slowly, feet up,
with only minimal steering input..
you should be able to ride circles and half circles
for minutes at a time.. the longer the better..

riding in traffic, including filtering at some level,
is one example of a real need for slow riding skill..
the emphasis being on riding - skill -

not only will you need, this riding skill on the roads,
at every set of lights or intersection and every startup
and end of a ride, but it will be part of your license
testing, wherever you are..
not only that, but skill and confidence created,
will also be evident to your license tester..

this is a really nice and great motorcycle
to learn on or travel the world :)
 

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Representing the US of A with the tri... Nice choice!
 

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One thing you should practice, usually overlooked even in courses for beginners but invaluable in my opinion, is maneuvering your new bike while you are not in the seat. Yes, I'm talking about pushing it around. You would be surprised how many bikes are damaged from toppling over while just being pushed out of a parking space, in the owner's driveway or at a petrol station. Not only are these little accidents expensive, they can be extremely embarrassing, too. Don't ask how I know this.

We all have our own way of doing this, but I use a method shown to me by a bike salesman, who spent most of his day doing it. He suggested having one hand on the nearest bar grip and the other flat on the pillion seat. You do most of the pushing through the seat and just steer with the other.

Others will add their tips, but the most important thing is to practice and work it out, possibly having a friend on the other side at first - most topples will happen when the bike falls away from you.

Other than that, enjoy!
 
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