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Discussion Starter #1
I am on the stock battery on my 2016 CB300F and yesterday it would not start (after over 4 weeks of not being ridden). Also i have a cheap alarm from Amazon that is hardwired to the battery so I am sure that this is also draining the battery faster than would be normal.

So I am charging the battery now and so far it is at 12.00

Do you think the stock battery will be okay after i charge it back up? Or could this be the end of of life for the stock battery: 2016 with 8500 miles. I am the 3rd owner of the bike. It has been 4 years. I never owned a battery-tender but I ordered one now. This is the longest I have gone without riding other than when I injured my arm last year.
 

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Four years is pretty respectable for an OEM battery. You may be able to recharge and keep it alive , but either way, the end is near enough for you to start looking for a good deal on a new battery. Battery Tenders normally come with additional wiring that can be used as plug and play, instead of clip-on alligator clips. Wire it from the battery to a convenient place under the pilon seat for easy access and don't worry the hassle getting to the battery the next time you want to hook up.
 

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I’d charge it up fully and take it to an auto electrician and get them to load test it. Most shops would do this for free or a nominal charge.
But if you’ve already ordered another then maybe not worth the bother. It can be good though to have a charged spare sitting on the shelf to get you out of jail or ‘jump’ off in a dead battery situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I’d charge it up fully and take it to an auto electrician and get them to load test it. Most shops would do this for free or a nominal charge.
But if you’ve already ordered another then maybe not worth the bother. It can be good though to have a charged spare sitting on the shelf to get you out of jail or ‘jump’ off in a dead battery situation.
Yes i had taken the battery to get load tested at the local AutoZone about 6 months ago and I think it rated at 86% life span left. Im going to get a Yuasa battery (the kind that you have to add the acid to it before you start using it). So this way I can let the battery sit on the shelf for however long it takes and it wont start to degrade at all until the acid is mixed in.

Im also ordering a rear tyre Kenda that I will change at 10k miles (currently I am at 8500 miles). So with these 2 investments I am planning to stay with the moto for at least 2 more years. I was tempted to upgrade to a Kawasaki Ninja 650cc twin but I will lose alot of money if i do that.

One of the big things I am unhappy about when it comes to the motorcycle styles of 2020 is that in almost all cases they have shrunk/eliminated the pillon seat grab-bars and this makes for less usable space for strapping a duffel bag down and carrying my supermarket groceries and so forth.

With these new high-tech bikes it is making my "dated" 2016 CB300F a less desirable theft target.

UPDATE: Cb300F failed to start =(

Actually the battery had tested at 100% healthy (9 months ago)
 

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2017 Honda CB300FAH (ABS)
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I decided to finally order a battery tender Jr. So i will make sure this does not happen again.
The BatteryTender will come with a quick disconnect wire harness you can permanently connect to the battery, running the connection end to under the removable seat. This makes use really convenient. It was one of the first mods I made to my bike (if one glorifies that by calling it a mod ;)). Take a small wire brush to the terminal nut and bolt to make sure your connection isn't diminished by a few years of grease and grime. You may need to cut a little notch out of the rubber cover for the positive battery post to accommodate the extra wire going out. You always want that positive battery post covered. With cars and motorcycles, the entire frame serves as a negative ground, so if anything touches that positive post and creates a circuit with any metal part of the bike, there will be a short (spark/fire).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The BatteryTender will come with a quick disconnect wire harness you can permanently connect to the battery, running the connection end to under the removable seat. This makes use really convenient. It was one of the first mods I made to my bike (if one glorifies that by calling it a mod ;)). Take a small wire brush to the terminal nut and bolt to make sure your connection isn't diminished by a few years of grease and grime. You may need to cut a little notch out of the rubber cover for the positive battery post to accommodate the extra wire going out. You always want that positive battery post covered. With cars and motorcycles, the entire frame serves as a negative ground, so if anything touches that positive post and creates a circuit with any metal part of the bike, there will be a short (spark/fire).
Thanks! I had never known that this was the reason for the red rubber cover on the positive battery terminal. Also I had avoided battery tenders for all these years since I thought it was more for guys that live in cold climates with snow that keeps the motorcycle in storage for 3+ months. I felt that so long as I go at least for 1 ride per week that I did not need a battery tender Junior.

Before this "Virus Scare" I had been going on regular motorcycle rides (at least 4 rides per week) and these were rides that where about 15 minutes in each direction. But then after this "cv situation" I had stopped riding the motorcycle because of fear of increased crime since I live in a high-crime neighborhood and was concerned about Moto-jackings and thefts while I had the bike parked at a store.

But things look to be getting back to normal over here in Miami, FL so I am back to my normal rides. It was quite a deprivation to be without the moto. Best hobby ever.
 
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