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imo you should never be in neutral at lights etc..
always be in first gear, clutch in, ready..
its easy to change down into first
as you approach the lights, or, in second
then into first just as youre coming to rest..
.
For the most part, I'm always in 1st gear at any light. I just thought it was strange that it happened. I also try to not panic when there's cars behind me when the bike won't go but i'm just curious if I should be concerned and take it to the dealer?
 

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@shisoshin: "imo you should never be in neutral at lights etc..
always be in first gear, clutch in, ready..
.."

That's not always practical/necessary. It makes sense when I stop and a car is approaching from behind. However,
when stopped in a traffic jam or at a long red light with car(s) stopped behind me it makes no sense to hold the clutch in.

I've taken off in the second gear and it went OK. I don't do it on a regular basis, though.
 

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Neutral at lights, etc: I do not leave in gear unless taking off is a few seconds away. I know there are all sorts of reasons why to engage first not neutral but my way has a logic or two as well.
When the clutch is held in, the rotating part of the clutch is spinning under load against some sort of bearing surface. Engines built to a price have a simple metal rod bearing against the rotating surface. I have had my clutch travel gradually disappear and the throwout turn into a mushroom on older bikes (notably a Panther - don't ask) so its my habit to use neutral.
I know modern clutch cables are not prone to snapping under relentless tension like they were once-upon-a-time. A sudden take-off into cross traffic was sometimes the reward when the inner cable parted ways from either end.
If we want to come to a stop in neutral, this is easier when the bike is still rolling (just ease it out of second, maybe a little help with momentary clutch pull. For me, it's good to be able to work the kinks out of my hands using a red light as a rest stop so not having to hold the lever is a benefit. Getting into first from neutral can also be a clunk and lurch if the clutch plates are in partial contact (too much free play at the clutch lever). Extra wear on the friction surfaces if they are not totally disengaged and touching. Most clutches have close tolerances so just a little warp or throwout wear can be a vicious cycle.
It's OK to disagree with me but there is method to my madness..
 

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what seems to 'make sense' is what you usually do,
which brain recognises as normal thus correct..

so it makes perfect sense for me to be in first at lights..
here its legal now to filter to the front at lights,
so im up there at the front, whenever possible,
ready to take off into clear 'motorcycle' space..

holding clutch lever to bars is a natural hold
and not like lifting weights or something..
if it doesnt feel easy and natural then
perhaps hand needs that light practice..

none of my many [honda] clutch cables
have ever failed.. given normal maintenance..

nor have any of my honda clutches failed
due to disengaging the clutch at lights..

this is not, to say any rider is wrong in their
choices of basic control of their motorcycle,
rather aimed at novices and others interested
in developing good basic safe riding skills,
as one, good and well tested option..
to each their own..
 

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My hand cramps up if I try to constantly squeeze the clutch. I can think of several dangerous situations that could arise if you can't get your bike into N. too. Also, how would you start the bike and warm it up...hold the clutch in the entire time? That wouldn't work for me. My Gixxer won't start unless the bike is in N and you've squeezed the clutch. You can then release the clutch of course to let the bike warm up. I have had several bikes that were a little hard to get into N, but my CB300F slips into N. very easily. I typically leave the bike in 1st until I'm almost stopped and sure nobody is racing up behind me in a car or with traffic lights I'm not familiar with, but usually I'm in N. when waiting on lights, shifting around in the seat and sort of standing up to relax my legs. I agree there's no right and wrong way to do it and it won't hurt the clutch to squeeze the clutch all the time at traffic lights. I can get into 1st gear very quickly and take off too, so there's no advantage to me waiting with the bike in gear. If I had a hard time getting into 1st (something other people have had with this model), that might be a good reason to keep it in gear too, but in that case I would get that problem fixed too.
 

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I've never had a Honda clutch or clutch cable fail, ever... and that includes clutches and cables on a number of off road Hondas, which operate in a far more harsh environment than what these relatively low HP Wee Bee's will see in typical use on the street while waiting 3 minutes for a traffic light to turn green.

While it's easy to come up with any number of reasons/excuses for not keeping the transmission in gear at traffic lights and thereby ready to go at a moments notice, the bottom line is that to not do so is putting yourself at greater risk.

Riding motorcycles is dangerous and involves risk. Minimizing your exposure to those risks in any way you can is the name of the game.
 
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if you leave it in neutral when you park,
it will be in neutral when you start again..

there may be situations where you want to
use your left hand for something, or turn
around, etc, when you need to use neutral..
there are situations where you must be
in first, clutch in, as part of every ride..

therefore, novices and anyone else wishing
to develop normal basic good riding skills
should have both options, available
and ready for use at any time..

develop the skill first,, then decide
whether or not to use it..
 

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After reading some of the advice from the past on this forum, I've created the habit of always being in first gear with clutch in at lights. I've gotten used to it, and I don't get tired.

I'd hate for there to be extra wear, but I'm hoping it should be okay after reading up further on this thread?

I bet most riders, especially in my area, pop it back in neutral every chance they can. Truth be told, I just want to form correct habits - so I'm always open to learning.
 
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@shisoshin: "imo you should never be in neutral at lights etc..
always be in first gear, clutch in, ready..
.."

That's not always practical/necessary. It makes sense when I stop and a car is approaching from behind. However,
when stopped in a traffic jam or at a long red light with car(s) stopped behind me it makes no sense to hold the clutch in.

I've taken off in the second gear and it went OK. I don't do it on a regular basis, though.
i agree, from a fellow toronto cb300f owner aha
 

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I think in reading responses to what I wrote, the very good counterpoints can be summarized by
1) Some riders can legally filter to the front of a stopped queue and must be ready to accelerate away in front
2) Having the bike in gear while stopped allows for some emergency maneuvering (as with a car approaching from the rear)
3) Difficulty putting the bike in gear (probably a fixable mechanical problem)
Also, my experiences from the stone age, (snapping cables and throwout wear) are not an issue with modern bikes.
I still value the habit that allows me to move around, adjust stuff, shake out the buzz-hand, etc. when a traffic light gives me a break.
Isn't the forum great?
 

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... 3) Difficulty putting the bike in gear (probably a fixable mechanical problem)...
And this problem of shifters sticking, not being able to get into 1st gear from neutral and vis versa, etc. is really a separate issue to the discussion here in this thread. Which is why I split off the posts here from the other thread and moved them to their own thread in the Riding Tips And Techniques forum.

The other thread discussing transmission shifting issues can be found in the Engine and Technical Discussion forum, here: http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/9978-cb300f-getting-stuck-neutral.html
 

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What a job Mike. There is a lot of eye-clutter on almost any web page and this forum is not the easiest to navigate. But then, there is a lot here so I thank you for the housekeeping. Count on me to be always agreeable if you need to move or delete anything from me. I hope with practice I will be better able to revisit existing conversations and search for new applicable ones.
 

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I always go to neutral at lights after filtering to the front, just sit back and relax. Pop it back into gear once you know its your turn next to go.
 

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I'm always in Neutral. It is more comfortable, and my reasoning also is even when having the clutch engaged, the clutch wears during a stand still.
I don't want to wear the clutch, so I put the bike in neutral.
On my Rebel, I can feel the bike pulsing forward, even with the clutch engaged. Very softly, like if the bike would be off the ground, the rear wheel would definitely spin.
Not so when in neutral, where the wheel wouldn't spin.

Even if most clutch plates are away from one another, few other might be lightly warped, and brushing by others, giving a not completely neutral position.
 

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I'm always in Neutral. It is more comfortable, and my reasoning also is even when having the clutch engaged, the clutch wears during a stand still.
I don't want to wear the clutch, so I put the bike in neutral.
On my Rebel, I can feel the bike pulsing forward, even with the clutch engaged. Very softly, like if the bike would be off the ground, the rear wheel would definitely spin.
Not so when in neutral, where the wheel wouldn't spin.

Even if most clutch plates are away from one another, few other might be lightly warped, and brushing by others, giving a not completely neutral position.
Sounds like you may need to adjust your clutch cable. If a clutch cable has too much free play, pulling the clutch lever to the handle bar can't full disengage the clutch, causing the bike to feel like it wants to creep forward when in gear. A clutch which isn't fully disengaging operates hotter and the friction plates will wear quicker.
 

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This idea that holding the clutch lever to the handle bar (clutch disengaged) while the engine idles for a couple minutes at a traffic light causes clutch wear is just another urban myth.

:rolleyes:
 

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for skilled riders this isnt some iron clad rule..
sometimes you will want to use left had to adjust
your yoga mat or stretch or whatever..
however, thinking especially of novice riders
or those whose skills are not yet as they will
become, there is a better as in safer, more effective
method [as in just about everything]..

the go is to establish the skills first, then compare
them, make the alternatives your own..
some are complaining about sore hands from
holding their clutch lever in stopped at lights,
which means their hands have not been
conditioned in life or riding to be able to do
this elementary, not difficult, basic form..

we are conditioned in whole of body movements
and use of interacting muscle groups, where riding
is itself the exercise and a form of physical therapy..
why avoid what is no more than a basic motorcycle
control function and use of the hand...

for those who have created rationalisations for not,
using their hand or doing headchecks or whatever
because they are 'too difficult' etc, the argument
is not directed toward them, rather to novices,
and other riders seeking to learn better more
effective control of their motorcycle,,
and whole of body developments
characteristic of regular riding..

one might drop into neutral at some lights
such as with no other traffic etc, to do
something, stretch or whatever..
but not when within traffic..

you cannot trust them...
rear-enders are one of if not the most
common [under reported] car on bike crashes..
even after filtering to the front at lights
[protected from basic rear-enders]
it is still better, to be ready
for immediate take off..

that means in first, clutch in,
alert and ready go..
 

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I haven't been riding long but what I've learnt is that you can control what's happening in front of you (distance from cars, speed approaching corners & stops etc) but you cant control what's happening behind you.

What if the guy in the pickup doesn't notice you and you get splattered on the pavement and you don't realise he's gonna stop until last second. If you're in 1st at least you can run off to the side or footpath. If you're in neutral you've got a couple of extra steps to get out of the way.

Anyway, I'm always in 1st keeping an eye on the mirrors.
 

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its not just the guy in the pickup,,
for the inexperienced new or lost old driver
just he moving reality around them
takes most if not all of their attention..

then there are those drivers making phone calls,
texting, checking emails and social networks,
playing computer games,, eating, drinking,
and other forms of distracted driving,
who often enough dont see us there..

a common sound at traffic lights worldwide
is the screeech - bang!! of rear-enders..

that good driver sitting behind you,
who can also be rear-ended, driving
him into you if stopped in front of him..

just like someone standing in front of a target
at a rifle range, who may not take a bullet,
but why would you stand there, waiting [?]

cars must stop in spaces designed around car
dimensions.. motorcycles may use any
part of he road, especially at lights..

motorcyclists are allowed to filter legally [aust]
because there is room for them, between cars..
because is safer for them, up at the front..

but you can also choose, to stop on the oil line
mid lane, or on either side of the cars line,
or in any space available that gives you
an advantage in preparation to move off
and/or in safer positioning while stopped..

when stopped, generally, you will need to
engage first gear, have your clutch in,
immediately before and as part of
taking off..

why not be in that position, ready..
its up to you, the motorcyclist..
 

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I agree with MotoMike, Shisoshin, etc...
BUT, in light of the fact that we can only control what we do for ourselves, who cares what everyone else wants to do. Sit in neutral...or don't... I don't care...
"Its up to you, the motorcyclist"... Shisoshin said that just now.
 
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