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The freeway traffic scenario you're describing doesn't necessarily require "horsepower" so much as it demands situational awareness and quick reactions. IMO, it's a common misconception that more speed or power is what's needed to get you out of potentially dangerous situations.
 

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[long response, assuming novice enquiry..
experienced etc just scroll on bye :)

this is one reality of sharing road space with cars
trucks and busses.. they do and will, change lanes
and otherwise enter your road space..

they are not paying attention, or dont care,
as in being aware that you must avoid them..
aside from those who do it deliberately..

for general avoidance, we are more quicker, more agile..
with basic awareness and that attitude tho, we are
similar to large flocks of birds or schools of fish
in being able to respond to our neighbours movements
without everyone crashing into each other..
a flock of a million budgerigars in aust for eg
can fly in a tight packed flock, including
responding to attacks by hawks..

if you intend to ride half asleep or actually micro-sleeping
or otherwise bombed out and letting their cars run on auto,
then perhaps a car would be more appropriate..
however, if you intend to and do ride with basic awareness
then your own well developed human response systems
are capable of responding quickly, as if the bike does it
itself.. this is one way some riders describe their own
reactions to avoiding cars..

one response we have or can have, is responding with our horn,
especially when we have a decent loud horn installed..
this means practicing using it, ie, brain training..
when in traffic that means having thumb 'floating'
over/close to its horn.. relaxed there, and ready..

the horn is capable of rousing and alerting drivers
to your presence, esp when it sounds like a truck,
which triggers their own, survival steering response,
back into the road space they came from..

talking about this here is like talking about braking
or whatever,, on the road its not down to intellect
rather to what you actually do, in the moment..

so you could be riding a 600rr say, and still be
taken out, if riding without basic awareness..
like the gunslinger with the powerful gun,
who doesnt get it out of its holster..

so in general, this motorcycle does have adequate
response times, being lightweight for its class
depending on what gear your in, or how
quickly you can change down and hit
your throttle, as you respond..

anyway, ive done many miles on many road
motorcycles and never been taken out
by a car, in a lane changing situation..
sure, many times, they have changed lanes
into my road space.. so many its like
basic for the course,, to be expected..

its like riding in the wet, or over any slick
surface etc,, yet not being taken out by it,
because you know what it is, and how
to ride in the conditions..

single track vehicles have many advantages,
but also their own vulnerabilities, especially
distracted or mindless drivers..

avoidance responses include escape routes..
situations would include gunning your 1000cc
powerhose, into more trouble, rather than
simply reacting to avoid/evade..

where you place yourself on roads is most
important, and basic.. there are better
and worse places to put yourself..
if theres an exit up ahead, assume that
cars will make late attempts to get into
the exit land.. its easy enough to be aware
of whats ahead, and to know where they
would go to get to the exit..
[just one easy example]..

within limits you can develop a good eye for
'types' of drivers, good and dangerous..
dont sit behind or alongside anyone
touching their brakes or other than
driving smoothly and efficiently..

it doesnt hurt to give a short touch of
your horn [or revs with a loud exhaust]
to let them know youre there..
at night a touch of high beam..

we are, vulnerable out there..
but we also have advantages
which allow for avoidance/escape
and for choosing where in the flow
we want to sit, and the ability to
make changes when required..

this is our riding environment in traffic flows..
choose to understand it, then be prepared,
thus enjoy the ride..
 

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I'd say yes.
You always have to plan your road.

I took it on the interstate, and it quickly accelerated to 90MPH (indicated).
I was surpassing most cars by 10-15MPH. I presume most cars where going 70-75MPH, so I must have been going around 80-85MPH, and still throttle left.

With a lot of headwind and at speeds of over 85MPH GPS, I think it might be harder (though haven't tried it yet).
But windstill, and at interstate legal speed limits, the 300 has power enough to do it.
 

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MeeLee.. as I said before.. cruising on the Highway 65 to 70 MPH on the CB 300 Series is not an issue and the bike is quite capable of doing so all day long.
 

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MeeLee.. as I said before.. cruising on the Highway 65 to 70 MPH on the CB 300 Series is not an issue and the bike is quite capable of doing so all day long.


+1 to that. Yesterday I cruised over to my parents place via my favourite back road route. Lots of sweeping bends and undulating landscape. One of the best rides Ive had in a while and perfect country for the WeeBR, I was loving it.
Ok so it wasn't a highway situation but I was traveling in that 65 -75 MPH range which is the sweet spot between peak torque at 7000RPM and peak power at 8500RPM and IMO there was ample power available to ride safely in multi lane traffic.
 

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... I was traveling in that 65 -75 MPH range which is the sweet spot between peak torque at 7000RPM and peak power at 8500RPM ...
What on earth were you thinking Al?... you know that you should never race that poor motor beyond 5000 RPM's in 6th gear. And I'll bet you didn't add any 2 stroke oil to the gasoline either. :eek:
 

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Oh Mike... you are so bad....:rolleyes: (LOL)
 

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What on earth were you thinking Al?... you know that you should never race that poor motor beyond 5000 RPM's in 6th gear. And I'll bet you didn't add any 2 stroke oil to the gasoline either. :eek:
Ah yes but I was running my 15/34 eco gearing so points there surely :D
 

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What MotoMike says about situational awareness is so true. Speaking for myself, I've done a good amount of highway riding in heavy and low traffic,
and so far haven't had any issues. Though it's true that my status would be as an advanced newbie with only 20 thou km behind my belt. At the same time I have witnessed a few situations when getting out the way "pronto" was the way to go (though they involved cars). In such a case - no, you wouldn't have enough power to accelerate away. Keeping on scanning the road around you constantly is vital. If you fall complacent and fixate on the space in front of your bike only or start daydreaming, you invite trouble.
 

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Ditto the situational awareness. I have ridden on the highway with bikes of all sizes, and not one of them allowed me to forget that. How I would react to a changing situation might be different on different bikes, but the need to be ready to react remains the same. Situational awareness also applies to the big picture--when you throw a leg over that bike, be fully aware of what its capabilities, strengths, and weaknesses are. A 101cc step-through is about the last thing you would want to take on the highway, but if (like me) you are stupid enough to do so, do everything you can to avoid situations it cannot handle. On the other end of the spectrum, there are any number of litre plus bikes that are brilliant on the highway, but cannot brake or steer as quickly as the CBR. Know what tools you have, keep them at hand, and employ them confidently.
 
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