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Our Petrol (gasoline) is either 95 or 97(super) octane. None has ethanol in it, we don't get 89/91 as cars and most bikes sold here the manufacturers recommend 95 or sports cars Porsche/Ferrari Aston Martin, Jags etc use 97. I have seen 91 in BC Canada and my friend uses that in their GM car as the engine is old technology.
Also we fill the bike/car up before paying either at the pump or in the kiosk. Where as when I was in the USA & Canada you had to pay first before filling up - how on earth are you suppose to know exactly what is required to the nearest part ltr/gallon.
 

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Hi, Dsimmo, virtually all fuel in the UK now is up to E5 ethanol, there are only a couple that dont, Shell, BP, and some Esso are all ethanol in both 95 and 97 exept for: http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/22730-esso-uk-ethanol.html I think a fewsmaller ones may be ethanol free but only in certain parts of the country, I use Esso 97 in mine as its ethanol free in my area but I have not tested that to see if there chatting **** or not. How to measure the ethanol content of gasoline
 

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Hi, Dsimmo, virtually all fuel in the UK now is up to E10 ethanol, there are only a couple that dont, Shell, BP, and some Esso are all ethanol in both 95 and 97 exept for: http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/engine-technical-discussion/22730-esso-uk-ethanol.html I think a fewsmaller ones may be ethanol free but only in certain parts of the country, I use Esso 97 in mine as its ethanol free in my area but I have not tested that to see if there chatting **** or not. How to measure the ethanol content of gasoline
Hi Mark
I use Esso in my older bikes and BP Super in my MT03 and car, all are ethanol free in my area.
 

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Hi Dsimmo, Ah, I thought BP contained ethanol, they didnt reply to my mail to confirm so I only had second hand info on that. I did run the 300 on 95 unleaded so maybe seperation is what happened to mine when it didnt want to start. Didnt take long though a week or two I think. Speaking of my bike, it dissapeared from Northwest Hondas site and now 5 months later reappeared for sale with the proper mileage on it, it wasnt sold because it has not been taxed since Feb and the mileage is the same as when I sold it, not sure where it been for that time. I am enjoying the 500 though.
 

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Our Petrol (gasoline) is either 95 or 97(super) octane. None has ethanol in it, we don't get 89/91 as cars and most bikes sold here the manufacturers recommend 95 or sports cars Porsche/Ferrari Aston Martin, Jags etc use 97. I have seen 91 in BC Canada and my friend uses that in their GM car as the engine is old technology.
Also we fill the bike/car up before paying either at the pump or in the kiosk. Where as when I was in the USA & Canada you had to pay first before filling up - how on earth are you suppose to know exactly what is required to the nearest part ltr/gallon.


From the Internet:
"UK std unleaded "95"octane = is what they call 90/91 octane in the USA

UK "super" "97/99"octane = is what they call 92 /93 octane in the USA "
 

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Here in the US, gasoline octane numbers are referred to as PON (Pump Octane Number), which is calculated differently than RON. And while the PON and RON numbers are calculated differently, it's still basically the same gasoline with similar amounts of octane.

FWIW, the PON as seen on the gas pumps in the US varies depending on the altitude of the geographic location... for example, here in Santa Fe, New Mexico (7000 ft. ASL) we have regular grade listed as 86 PON. Mid-Grade is 88 PON, and Premium Grade is 90 or 91 PON. This is pretty consistent throughout the Rocky Mountain region. At gas stations located at even higher altitudes, you can see the PON listed as 85/87/89 or 90. At lower altitudes, the numbers are higher by 1 or 2 points, so pumps in the rest of the country will list PON as 87/89/91 or sometimes 92 for Premium grade.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Different octane ratings supplied are due to altitude.
In Europe it is listed as RON rating 95,97, is the norm.
Canada uses the same ratings as the USA, it was when I was there between 2005 to 2014. Also in Dallas TX.
 

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Our Petrol (gasoline) is either 95 or 97(super) octane. None has ethanol in it, we don't get 89/91 as cars and most bikes sold here the manufacturers recommend 95 or sports cars Porsche/Ferrari Aston Martin, Jags etc use 97. I have seen 91 in BC Canada and my friend uses that in their GM car as the engine is old technology.
Also we fill the bike/car up before paying either at the pump or in the kiosk. Where as when I was in the USA & Canada you had to pay first before filling up - how on earth are you suppose to know exactly what is required to the nearest part ltr/gallon.
Luckily for me, the Co-op stations in my area do not add ethanol, probably because they do so much business with boaters. Farther south on the Island, they add 10% ("may contain") to the Regular, which means you get half that in the mid-grade and none in the premium. When I fill up to the south, I am likely to run the tank through within the day, so I don't sweat the ethanol. Around town, where I might park it for a few days with a tankful, I am glad I don't need to worry about the ethanol.

As for pre-pay, I am not sure how long ago you were in BC, but almost all stations here have pay-at-the-pump, so no pre-pay unless you are using cash. I took a trip to Washington State last year, and they were so technologically challenged money-wise that it boggled my mind. I just kept buying gas in even dollar amounts less than a fill because it was easier.
 

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Our Petrol (gasoline) is either 95 or 97(super) octane. None has ethanol in it, we don't get 89/91 as cars and most bikes sold here the manufacturers recommend 95 or sports cars Porsche/Ferrari Aston Martin, Jags etc use 97. I have seen 91 in BC Canada and my friend uses that in their GM car as the engine is old technology.
Your 95 RON is equal to our 87 PON regular grade, and your 97 "super" is equal to our 91 PON Premium grade. In other words, your gasoline (and it's respective octane content) is basically the same as ours. As I stated in my previous post, it's just a different way of calculating the octane rating.



Also we fill the bike/car up before paying either at the pump or in the kiosk. Where as when I was in the USA & Canada you had to pay first before filling up - how on earth are you suppose to know exactly what is required to the nearest part ltr/gallon.
So are you saying that if you use a bank card (credit or debit card) in the UK to pay for your gas at the pump, you insert it into the pump card reader after dispensing the fuel? If so, that would seem an odd way to do it. What happens if you've pumped your gas and then your bank card is declined, and you happen to have no cash with you? Does the gas station then just trust you to return later to pay for the gas?
 

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Hi, I only have one station (Esso) that has pay at the pump, other stations usually take your details( car reg, license or some id, may keep them till you return if you forget your wallet or your card is declined, if its your local and they know you most of the time they just write it down and ask you to pay next time you pass (happened to me once or twice, forgetting wallet).
 

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Your 95 RON is equal to our 87 PON regular grade, and your 97 "super" is equal to our 91 PON Premium grade. In other words, your gasoline (and it's respective octane content) is basically the same as ours. As I stated in my previous post, it's just a different way of calculating the octane rating.





So are you saying that if you use a bank card (credit or debit card) in the UK to pay for your gas at the pump, you insert it into the pump card reader after dispensing the fuel? If so, that would seem an odd way to do it. What happens if you've pumped your gas and then your bank card is declined, and you happen to have no cash with you? Does the gas station then just trust you to return later to pay for the gas?
I know you were addressing this to the UK, but I wanted to clarify the differences I pointed out. In Canada, the pumps are designed to encourage paying with credit or debit card. Insert card, get approval up to a selected maximum, pump gas, go. When I toured the Olympic Peninsula/Tacoma/Seattle, you could pay with a credit card (not debit) at the pump, but had to enter a zip code. Canadian Postal Code was a fail. The only alternative was pre-pay inside, never a convenient option when motorcycling. Even when I moved back to Canada 20+ years ago, it was ahead of the US in transitioning to electronic transactions. Just surprised to see that little had changed.

Also, thank you for the User's Guide to Octane Ratings. It can be misleading when you don't know which rating system is in use.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Your 95 RON is equal to our 87 PON regular grade, and your 97 "super" is equal to our 91 PON Premium grade. In other words, your gasoline (and it's respective octane content) is basically the same as ours. As I stated in my previous post, it's just a different way of calculating the octane rating.





So are you saying that if you use a bank card (credit or debit card) in the UK to pay for your gas at the pump, you insert it into the pump card reader after dispensing the fuel? If so, that would seem an odd way to do it. What happens if you've pumped your gas and then your bank card is declined, and you happen to have no cash with you? Does the gas station then just trust you to return later to pay for the gas?
Mike:
At our petrol stations near me, you can use credit or debit card at the pump. When you pull up you have the choice (button) on the pump to choose either pay at kiosk/shop. If paying at the pump insert card in slot and pin number on keypad, fill car/bike up and you get a printout when you put the nozzle back in holder.
 

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Your 95 RON is equal to our 87 PON regular grade, and your 97 "super" is equal to our 91 PON Premium grade. In other words, your gasoline (and it's respective octane content) is basically the same as ours. As I stated in my previous post, it's just a different way of calculating the octane rating.

So are you saying that if you use a bank card (credit or debit card) in the UK to pay for your gas at the pump, you insert it into the pump card reader after dispensing the fuel? If so, that would seem an odd way to do it. What happens if you've pumped your gas and then your bank card is declined, and you happen to have no cash with you? Does the gas station then just trust you to return later to pay for the gas?
You generally insert the card and either choose how much you want or set to fill. Then enter your pin and go.
I believe it charges the card as it goes and will let the card OD if it can or stops it if there is not enough balance.
 

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Mike:
At our petrol stations near me, you can use credit or debit card at the pump. When you pull up you have the choice (button) on the pump to choose either pay at kiosk/shop. If paying at the pump insert card in slot and pin number on keypad, fill car/bike up and you get a printout when you put the nozzle back in holder.
Okay, so you do pay at the pump with a card before actually dispensing the gas... that's what I figured was the case. So pay at the pump is no different in the UK as it is here in the US. You did state in your previous post that you paid after filling up when using a bank card.
 

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Kiwis are trusting folk, here we pump first, pay later. The odd jerk does a runner but that's what the cameras are there for.
Most places (that I encounter) here are like that, as well. Some big places allow this only with the pumps closest to the cashier. The more remote pumps must be either pre-paid or use your credit card.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Okay, so you do pay at the pump with a card before actually dispensing the gas... that's what I figured was the case. So pay at the pump is no different in the UK as it is here in the US. You did state in your previous post that you paid after filling up when using a bank card.
You put card into the slot and put pin number on keypad. You fill up tank and when finished put the nozzle back and it automatically charges the card the value of what you used.
If you pay at shop/kiosk, you fill up and then tell the cashier what pump number you used and then you pay, cash/credit/debit card. if under £30 by card (contactless) you can just hold card over reader and it automatically takes the money. If over £30 you have use pin number after inserting the card in the reader. You get a printed receipt whichever you choose to use.
Hope that clarifies it.
 

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You put card into the slot and put pin number on keypad. You fill up tank and when finished put the nozzle back and it automatically charges the card the value of what you used...
Like I said previously, that's exactly the same method of paying at the pump we have over here. Not sure what counter-point you're trying to make.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Like I said previously, that's exactly the same method of paying at the pump we have over here. Not sure what counter-point you're trying to make.
No counter point, just clarifying as you requested.
 
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