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Welcome to the forum Karl. What sort of bike do you ride in paradise? :)
 

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Yes Welcome Karl....from a fellow who lives in Eastern Canada...:)
 

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been riding like crazy too (Broward/Miami Dade county).
Unfortunately our winters only last 3 months. Then the big man above switches on the summer, with temps of 90 and above.
 

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been riding like crazy too (Broward/Miami Dade county).
Unfortunately our winters only last 3 months. Then the big man above switches on the summer, with temps of 90 and above.
You referring to Arnold Schwarzenegger or Shaquille O'Neal?

;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Welcome to the forum Karl. What sort of bike do you ride in paradise? :)
Not quite paradise, but certainly a lot more conducive to year-round riding than many other places. Keep in mind too that up here, we're in the heart of winter (such as it is lol).

I actually ride a CBR500R. I came here to post my two cents for any lurkers trying to decide between the 300 and the 500. I probably won't be a regular here, given that I don't own a 300, but I thought I might be able to provide a useful service nonetheless :)
 

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I actually ride a CBR500R. I came here to post my two cents for any lurkers trying to decide between the 300 and the 500. I probably won't be a regular here, given that I don't own a 300, but I thought I might be able to provide a useful service nonetheless :)
Thanks for your input Karl, it was a comprehensive assessment that you wrote.
There's probably a lot more guest readers coming here looking for info to help make their minds up than we realise.
 

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That's what I did too this weekend. Can't beat Florida for year-round riding weather!
I get sub 60f minimum temps for a total of around 7 nights a year, last year we had one night hit 55 and i wore welding gloves home.

But enough with these silly units, anything sub 20 C is jacket weather.
 

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....But enough with these silly units, anything sub 20 C is jacket weather.
For me, anything sub 36C or so is jacket weather, not because I need the warmth, but the protection. It's when it gets above that when I have a problem. I have rashly said in the past that I would NEVER ride without a riding jacket, but a trip to Uluru in summer, where I hired a Harley in 45C weather, made me a liar.

Kinell it was hot. The jackets stayed on for about 200m, then they were stuffed into the panniers for the rest of the day.

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
While on the topic of weather, I have a question. Do our bikes run better in the cold? Due to the air being more condensed allowing more O2 in the system? Also for everyone that lives in Florida, how do your bikes ride in mid summer? 100 degrees/90% humidity?
Yep. As long as you've got more oxygen molecules per volume - which is what you get with cooler air - your engine is going to breathe better. Happens to people, too - if your'e a runner, you're going to notice how much more quickly you become out of breath when it's hot out versus when it's cooler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for your input Karl, it was a comprehensive assessment that you wrote.
There's probably a lot more guest readers coming here looking for info to help make their minds up than we realise.
Thanks, I appreciate it. In the end, no matter which of these bikes you choose, you just can't go wrong.
 

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Yep. As long as you've got more oxygen molecules per volume - which is what you get with cooler air - your engine is going to breathe better. Happens to people, too - if your'e a runner, you're going to notice how much more quickly you become out of breath when it's hot out versus when it's cooler.
So our bikes will run better in the winter? In the summer will we notice any difference in HP or will the ECU compensate?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So our bikes will run better in the winter? In the summer will we notice any difference in HP or will the ECU compensate?
All I can tell you is that cool air is denser and more oxygen rich than an equal volume of warmer air. Engines run better in it, people breathe better in it, airplanes fly better in it. I'm sure the engine computer takes cooler air into account somehow, but I know next to nothing about that.
 

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All I can tell you is that cool air is denser and more oxygen rich than an equal volume of warmer air. Engines run better in it, people breathe better in it, airplanes fly better in it. I'm sure the engine computer takes cooler air into account somehow, but I know next to nothing about that.
Therefore the Ram-Air that I always install on my autos. But auto computers are far more advanced than our lil ECU :laugh:
 

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That's what I did too this weekend. Can't beat Florida for year-round riding weather!
Riding year round is great isn't it? Here in California we're also in the high 70s to mid 80s at the moment (a welcomed change from the low 90's we had a couple of weeks ago). All of the sun, and none of the rain :):serious::(
 

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While on the topic of weather, I have a question. Do our bikes run better in the cold? Due to the air being more condensed allowing more O2 in the system? Also for everyone that lives in Florida, how do your bikes ride in mid summer? 100 degrees/90% humidity?
In short:

I had to adjust my opinion, thinking it over, I presume that the CBR300R/CB300F bikes will run better in colder weather.

There are reasons, that I believe would not be the case if the bike where air cooled and/or the bike had a carburetor.


long:
Since the fuel injection system compensates for most a/f ratio fluctuations, the performance will be better in cold weather.
On a bike with a carburetor, it'll depend on how the carburetor is tuned. If it's running rich from the factory, the extra O2 on colder weather actually makes it run 'leaner' or better (as the bike will be running more closely to the optimal A/F ratio).
If a bike with carburetor is running lean from the factory, hotter weather allows the carburetor to 'richen up', by somewhat 'depriving' the bike from oxygen.
The same amount of fuel, on less oxygen, means the bike will run richer, and closer to the 'optimal A/F ratio'.

These are non-issues on a Fuel Injected bike.
Colder air is more dense, so in the same cylinder, there will fit more molecules of cold air, than hot air.
The Fuel injection system will compensate, by richening up the mixture a bit, to keep the same A/F ratio it's programmed to keep.
The more dense air is resulting in better performance and efficiency in cold weather, as more air passes through the engine per rotation.


Oil gets thinned out with hotter weather, in the crankcase, and especially on air cooled engines.
Oil gets thinned out, but less, on watercooled bikes, as the cylinders will run just about as hot under load as idle; hot or cold weather.

If you're running an air cooled bike, warmer temperatures make a bigger temperature difference between the air entering in the cylinder, and the air after the combustion.
Meaning, if outside air was 20 degrees hotter than on a cold day, the exhaust will be a multitude of 20 degrees hotter than on the cold day; basically, on an air cooled bike hot air is running the combustion process more efficiently.

A liquid cooled bike with a thermostat has a more controlled temperature of the cylinderwalls; and thus exhaust temperatures at the port are only affected by the density of the incoming air (cooler air is more dense), and not by a hotter combustion chamber (cylinder walls).



That last question i presume I'll be able to answer in a month or 2, but I think the bike still can do a nice 85 to 90MPH GPS in hot weather.
If it doesn't, it might be pinging, and I might need to switch to mid-grade or premium fuel, which is an issue with my Chevrolet Cruze (turbo engine) on hot summer days.
 

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Back when I was a kid my father use to build top fuel drag engines. Actually he re-built them after each race. I remember on some of the more street modded cars (running around 10's in the 1/4mile) would have stainless steel gas tanks in the rear and around them they would use pounds of ice to cool the gas down.
I got my bike last June so it was the middle of the summer here in Florida and as I remember it ran fine, but it was stock (mostly) at that point. I added the slip-on Musarri exhaust a few weeks later but that didn't do much except make it louder. I'm wondering now that I have more mods how it will run with the humidity. Heat is 1 thing. Like out west when I lived in Montana it would reach 95degrees but in the shade it felt cool(er). In Florida when it hits 95 degrees the humidity is so high that as soon as you walk outside you feel like you're in a shower. I just start dripping in sweat. I am hooking up my fuel controller in about a week and tossing the O2 sensor completely. Putting a bung plug in it. I'm thinking I might need to make a couple maps, 1 for winter and 1 for summer.
 
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