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Hi my name is Andy, I just bought a CBR300r with Abs in red. I live on the south east coast of Australia. Any riding tips would be greatly appreciated as I am not very confident so haven't ridden much. Thanks
 

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well, fortunately today there are heaps of good videos etc,
giving just that, riding tips for novices and others..

use google, youtube videos with search keys such as
'how to park a motorcycle', and soon..
also, this forum and especially cbr250r forum
which has been up for years now, have heaps of
advice/feedback on riding techniques and so on..
use the search box[es]..

my 3rd daughter bought herself a 250 suzuki single,
first motorcycle or car.. zero riding/driving experience..
she was also very nervous - even tho a confident person -
and afraid 'of getting killed', so hardly rode far from home
for a while, concentating on the basics,, of good control
while sitting on or parking or otherwise moving around,
[ie, engine off] plus getting good smooth clutch control,
by simply starting to take off, then clutch in, and come to
a smooth controlled stop, the last bit being most important..

but firstly, you will need to develop good control of clutch
in starting to, take off, which is, the first part of riding..
you can do this anywhere.. in your driveway, wherever..
smooth stops start happening right from the start,
each time your do a start, or the start of a start,
you will start moving forward,, thus, you must then
come to a [smooth, slow] stop, before repeating
another start..

when you develop good [smooth] clutch control
which can still work even with high revs,,
- as engine power cannot get past the clutch
which you control, with the clutch lever -

so to start, its ok to use higher than normal revs,
which will prevent the engine being overloaded
and/or bogging down thru not enougn, power..

as you get used to this clutch and throttle coordination
it will become easy to use just the right amount of
throttle thus power to take off according to circumstances..

between that first take off and that final stop
everything else comes more naturally
and more easily..

once the motorcycle is going under some power,
it wont fall over, due to the laws of motion
causing the bike/you to remain vertical..

steering at very low speeds by turning the front wheel,
is not the factor once under way, when leaning
into corners and curves, is the way to turn..

unless you actually do certain things to make it
lean over, once at speed, it simply wont..

novices typically crop their bikes from standstill,
sitting on them, or almost stopped and just starting
to get going,, or, when coming to a hasty stop..

things like turning across a sloped road for eg,
is also another danger for novices due to unnatural
effects of gravity on the moving bike and rider,
which are now quite like steering very slowly
but not quite into leaning starting speed either..

when starting on a slope, in your novice phases,
always best to start going down the hill,
rather that up the hill..
always better to aim the front wheel
where you want to go, or at least partly
in that direction [eg, downhill]..
that way the bike will start moving forward,
in that direction, before you need to add
further steering input and correction..

these simple things, good control sitting on her,
moving forward and backward sitting on her,
just learning to take the weight thru both feet
and thru one foot while stationary, together with
basic, smooth clutch control in starting off,,
and, smooth unhurried coming to a stop,
are often overlooked by some novices,
as 'not riding'..

when in reality, once under way, all being equal,
the motorcycle will 'ride itself'..
[sometimes people come off their motorcycles
at some speed, and the bike just keeps going,
in a straight line according to road camber etc,
and until revs drop back down]

the better your most basic control of clutch
and throttle, and of your combined c of g
are and become, the less likely you will be
to come off unexpectedly...

[my daughter, cecilia, is now riding about
up and down blue mountains to work
and just for a nice ride..,]
 

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Hey Andy, welcome to the forum.

I don't know how far down the east coast you live but be aware of winter road conditions this time of year whilst your finding your feet on the bike. The combination of cold tyres on wet or icy roads or roads with grit can be a recipe for a spill. You don't want that happening and putting a dent in your confidence at this early stage.

I'm not going to try and give you any tips on how to learn to ride as I don't even remember how I did it as it was 35yrs ago! Lol

From memory the clutch/throttle co-ordination was the hardest bit to master, but it will come naturally in time with practice.

The most important thing is to enjoy your riding and don't ride beyond your ability too soon. A real common trap is when you first start riding with other riders who are more experienced and you feel pressured to keep up.

Have fun out there on the road :)
 

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If you haven't taken a motorcycle riding class, I strongly recommend it (if it's available where you live, of course). As far as learning, take it slow, find a nice empty parking lot to put around in and practice smooth clutch/throttle operation, as well as smooth, controlled use of both front and rear brakes. Practice keeping your head and eyes up, practice engaging and canceling your indicators without looking for the button. A really good video for riding technique is called "twist of the wrist." Im pretty sure you can find it on YouTube. It's pretty cheesy, but it's full of good information. Overall, just have fun, and be safe!
 

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If you haven't taken a motorcycle riding class, I strongly recommend it (if it's available where you live, of course). As far as learning, take it slow, find a nice empty parking lot to put around in and practice smooth clutch/throttle operation, as well as smooth, controlled use of both front and rear brakes. Practice keeping your head and eyes up, practice engaging and canceling your indicators without looking for the button. A really good video for riding technique is called "twist of the wrist." Im pretty sure you can find it on YouTube. It's pretty cheesy, but it's full of good information. Overall, just have fun, and be safe!
Agreed. I tooled around my subdivision for about 2 wks before I ventured out on the roads. Find every stop sign in your subdivision or complex and practice your (engine) braking. Then find some slight hills to practice starting on a hill from 1st. Things like that...
Good luck!
 
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