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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Honda CB300s sold in the U.S. have not come with OEM tool kits for a number of years (in contrast to those sold outside the US, which do). My 2017 CB300F only included a vinyl tool pouch with a 5mm hex key, a plastic fuse puller, and a helmet lock cable. So, if U.S. owners want a roadside tool kit that fits under the seat, they must build their own. Although eBay offers some generic options with incomplete and questionable components for a little under $20, one can also build a more complete kit with slightly less questionable Honda OEM parts for less than $35. For those interested in building one out, here are all the part numbers in one list. They can be ordered through a dealer or any Honda parts supplier. The latter includes Revzilla which may be the least expensive route if you get the order total above $39.95 so shipping is free. This is honestly an OCD exercise. For general maintenance (and anything else) you’ll want a set of “real” tools in anything but an emergency. Still, it's nice to have something there.

Honda tools that come with the U,S. CB300s:
  • Tool Bag (160mm) 89219-KGH-900
  • Fuse Puller 38235-TA0-A01 (Spare fuses are in the fuse box)
  • Wire Helmet Holder 77236-KAZ-780
  • Hex Wrench (5mm) 89221-429-000

Honda tools to add:
  • [Screwdriver] Grip 89103-538-000
  • Screwdriver (NO.2 +/-) 89102-KTC-900
  • Eye Wrench (19mm) 99006-19000 (Alt. part #: 89219-KWW-601)
  • Eye Wrench (24mm) 99006-24000
  • Eye Wrench Handle 89217-KGH-900
  • Spanner / wrench (10 x 14mm) 99001-10140 (Alt part #s.: 89211-KWW-640)
  • Spanner / wrench (8 x 12mm) 99001-08120 (Alt. part #s: 89211-MGZ-J00 & 89224-431-670)
  • Pliers (135mm / 5.3” RIKEN) 89210-GBJ-J00 (not included in Honda’s list, but a small pair of pliers should have been.)

The non-US Honda toolkit also includes:
  • A Pin Spanner 89202-KY1-700 (for the rear shock pre-set).
    The Honda spanner is small and awkward to use. I bought a Motion Pro 08-0029 Shock Collar Spanner Wrench 68/87mm which I keep it in my garage toolchest.
  • A [Spark] Plug Wrench (16.5) 89216-MAT-000 (The CB300s [NGK] SIMR8A9 spark plug requires a 16mm (5/8”) plug wrench.)
    Accessing the sparkplug on the CB300 requires a fair amount of disassembly. I already had a GearWrench 80546 5/8” (16mm) swivel sparkplug socket in my garage toolchest.

I also carry:
  • A 6mm hex key
  • 4-6 x 8-inch cable ties
  • A small roll of electric tape
  • An inexpensive small lock-blade knife like you’d find in a bin at a hardware store counter
  • A kickstand plate (for parking on soft ground)
  • A disk brake lock (7mm pin) with reminder cable
  • A pencil-style tire gauge (5 - 50 psi)
  • and A Bic stick pen, piece of paper, registration, insurance card, and a $10 bill for emergency gas money

I’ve installed a Battery Tender quick-disconnect harness under the seat (which comes with the Battery Tender Junior or 800 smart battery charger / maintainer).

The plastic cut-out under the seat for the tool bag is 7 1/8"L * 3 5/8"W * 1 3/4"H (with some wiggle room on height). There’s also some space next to and behind it.

Hand tool Tool Font Material property Metalworking hand tool


Hope this info helps someone. Stay safe.
 

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Thanks for the comprehensive info. When i go away on a long trip I tend to pack a kit comprising of my quality tools from the workshop. A lot of factory bolts and nuts that havent been undone before are crazy tight and its easy to round heads off using cheap open ended spanners.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the comprehensive info. When i go away on a long trip I tend to pack a kit comprising of my quality tools from the workshop. A lot of factory bolts and nuts that havent been undone before are crazy tight and its easy to round heads off using cheap open ended spanners.
True, but the main thing I'd carry on a trip would be a tire repair kit and a micro-inflator like the Stop & Go RCP Mini-Air Compressor (4" x 6" x 2"). I think one could find room for a Dynaplug Ultralite Tubeless Tire Repair Tool Kit under the seat but I don't think I could jigsaw in an inflator too without going the backpack route.
 

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True, but the main thing I'd carry on a trip would be a tire repair kit and a micro-inflator like the Stop & Go RCP Mini-Air Compressor (4" x 6" x 2"). I think one could find room for a Dynaplug Ultralite Tubeless Tire Repair Tool Kit under the seat but I don't think I could jigsaw in an inflator too without going the backpack route.
Yep, got one of those kits under the seat for sure. Mine has three small gas canisters you use to re-inflate.
This is a relatively recent edition after I got caught out with a flattie last Christmas eve at about 4pm on my way to my parents place. luckily it was only a 1.5 km push into a small rural town where the local trucking firm sorted me out. There were still there having Christmas drinks and in good humor so no charge to me and lots of banter!
Turned out it was a splinter of dog bone in the tyre, bizarre.
 

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I saw this shortage after purchasing my bike last fall. I went and bought a bicycle tool bag from the local athletic store and started filling it up with the tools I thought would be most helpful in the event of a breakdown like combination wrenches, stubby screwdrivers, pliers and a 1/4" drive socket wrench with a couple of sockets. I haven't bought a tire plug kit and inflator but that's an eventual purchase sometime in the future. I'm surprised this failure to purchase hasn't jinxed me with a flat-knock on wood.:D
 

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I saw this shortage after purchasing my bike last fall. I went and bought a bicycle tool bag from the local athletic store and started filling it up with the tools I thought would be most helpful in the event of a breakdown like combination wrenches, stubby screwdrivers, pliers and a 1/4" drive socket wrench with a couple of sockets. I haven't bought a tire plug kit and inflator but that's an eventual purchase sometime in the future. I'm surprised this failure to purchase hasn't jinxed me with a flat-knock on wood.:D
I got one like this that uses the high pressure cannisters to re-inflate, doesn't take up much room under the seat or weigh much.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
v
I got one like this that uses the high pressure cannisters to re-inflate, doesn't take up much room under the seat or weigh much.
I have a similar kit sold in the U.S. J&P Cycles Tubeless Tire Repair Kit - YP881
It's a standard T-handle plug kit like you'd get at Walmart, Home Depot or any auto parts store + the razor blade, CO2 cartridges and adapter. The problem with it is that it's largish and doesn't fit under the seat. I have two motorcycles - the Honda CB300F and a Kawasaki Versys 650 which has panniers.

On the Versys I carry a Stop & Go 76002 Tubeless Tire Repair Kit, https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001CJN7JE/
and a Stop & Go RCP Mini-Air Compressor (4" x 6" x 2"), https://smile.amazon.com/Stop-Go-RCP-Mini-Air-Compressor/dp/B00388NUPI/ in a little nylon bag with a few other conveniences.

The other micro-compressor option I found is the Dynaplug Micro Pro Inflator Kit (3.9" L x 3.6" W x 1.6" H, sold with bag if bought from Dynaplug), Dynaplug® Online Store | Dynaplug® Micro Pro Inflator

I've patched 2 tires - 1 car, and the Versys. I was able to do both in my driveway using the T-handle plug kit and an electric air compressor. So, I haven't used CO2 cartridges or the micro compressor, though I have used small DC carry in your car compressors. Reaming the tire is fairly straight forward. Plugging it with the insertion tool takes quite a bit of effort / push so I hope never to have to actually use the screw-driver handle one I carry on the Versys and will be happy to have gloves if I do. Similarly, the smaller the compressor one buys, the slower it will work. Those micro-compressors are for emergency use, not monthly fills. On the other hand, CO2 cartridges can be iffy, you only get one shot with each, and hope to get enough of a fill to make it to a service station.

Back to the Honda - I verified that you can fit a bundle of three CO2 cartridges with the valve stem adapter and razor blade in the area by the rear taillight without their case. (The exposed CO2 cartridges made me very uncomfortable.) I don't know whether you could also cram a plug kit next to the tool kit. It's really tight. There just isn't much room under that rear seat. If you were going to carry a patch kit in a bag or backpack, then you are only constrained by what is conveniently compact, so I'd go with a small T-handle kit (like the Slime 8-piece) and a micro inflator.

All that said, one can get overly obsessed with this (I certainly have). For most people the CB300 isn't a long-range bike. Yes, I'll take mine for 2 - 4 hour rides, but I only rarely stray more than ~60 miles from home and am usually reasonably local. If I get a puncture on the 300, I figure I'll deal with it by parking the bike and either calling my wife (doing a back and forth with tools) or calling AAA. Of course, a good kit becomes more critical in rural areas where help or cell service isn't readily available, but then one is back to carrying stuff in a backpack.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I use a Victor Plug & Go tire repair kit with screw-in plastic plugs. I have used this on both car and motorcycle tires. Very easy to use and has always worked for me.
I've never seen those before. Definitely interesting / cool product but it looks like one is just replacing a nail with a plastic screw? I searched YouTube for a review but got nothing. Not sure I'd feel too safe driving too long on one afterwards, but if it gets you home or to a shop to replace the tire, I guess it's done it's job.

Here's an Amazon link so people can see what it is:
 

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I've never seen those before. Definitely interesting / cool product but it looks like one is just replacing a nail with a plastic screw? I searched YouTube for a review but got nothing. Not sure I'd feel too safe driving too long on one afterwards, but if it gets you home or to a shop to replace the tire, I guess it's done it's job.
Yeah, I'd be inclined to believe this is a "get me home and I'll fix it properly later" deal. Not a bad idea if it works as advertised. I've used the classic jab-ream-insert-strings repairs before. I also consider those a "just get me home" fix. Either way any of these temporary fixes is better than a tow or push me home.
 

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Yeah, I'd be inclined to believe this is a "get me home and I'll fix it properly later" deal. Not a bad idea if it works as advertised. I've used the classic jab-ream-insert-strings repairs before. I also consider those a "just get me home" fix. Either way any of these temporary fixes is better than a tow or push me home.
Opps, Ive had one of those in my rear tyre for about 5,000km now... :whistle:
 

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Opps, Ive had one of those in my rear tyre for about 5,000km now... :whistle:
You down-under-guys always amaze me with your good luck. :unsure:
I actually had to ream-and-plug about 2 months ago while riding near the Blue Ridge Parkway. It was only my 2nd flat in over 50 years of riding. At that rate, I figure I'm good until I'm well over 90 years old. If I can make it that long... next flat, I'll call a wrecker and call it a good day.
 
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