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Discussion Starter #1
Basically the title I still consider myself a relatively new owner having done minimal maintenance on my bike (2018 cbr300r) up until this point (7,700 miles).

I need to replace the rear tire and want to replace the front tire + front brake pad also.

I haven't adjusted the chain tension or done anything too technical thus far. (just oil and installing tail tidy/frame sliders)

I would say I have 75% of the tools I think I need to perform all the tasks required above if I DIY I would use Ride On Tire Sealant which would remove the requirement to balance the tire. I would need to buy all the ones related to the tire replacement and likely would want to buy some jack stands for extra security when possibly replacing the front tire (my front stand sits under the forks and rests on rubber pad.)

I received a quote for $275 (including the front brake pad but without tires because online is soo much cheaper) to get it done for me on top of inspecting brake system operation and throttle operation. I think that's a bit steep so I'm looking into possibly doing it myself.

I also just realized I don't have a copy of the service manual, does anyone have a copy that doesn't look like complete garbage? A quick look online I only found poor quality or non-searchable versions. I need to go to sleep.
 

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This clip shows you how to change your brake pads: (CBR250 identical to 300)

Regarding changing tires, do yourself (and your rims) a favor and a get a bike shop with a tire changing machine to do them. It's a **** of a job and there are good chances you will scratch your rims using tyre levers.
I've been messing with bikes for 35 years, have all the gear but still choose to get my road tyres changed at a shop.
 

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Kiwi's dead on with his reasoning. I also have the gear and tools, and every time I'm groaned and grunted a new set of tires on my bike.. I've sworn that was the last set. No matter how careful I've been, by the time the new tires are on, I've needed to touch-up wheels, because I've damaged the finish. If your goal is to save money, Buy your tires online and have a shop install them. You can still save considerable money by learning to remove/install the wheels, so the shop doesn't need to charge you labor on anything but tire removal/install. Let them balance them while you're there, it's not much extra costs. If you can remove/install the front and rear wheels, replacing brake pads would be a simple tasks to complete.:nerd:
 

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the stock tires are bias ply very stiff side walls-if you replace with radials much easier to install- easier still check and see if you have a Cycle Gear in your area if so they will change tires for $25 a wheel(you remove wheels) if you buy the tires from them last go round they had the best prices on tires and that price includes balance--don't bet your life on Ride On that crap does not work as advertised
 

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ive done tyre changes on steel rim bikes, but for cbr250/300r its the pro shop with the right equipment.. never having adjusted your chain in 7,700 miles is also a hint for this particular job, which while not 'difficult' does get easier second, third etc, times.. best not learn on alloy wheels..
seriously, the motorcyclist within you should really find and get to know that rear chain and sprockets, and their alignment...
this is real maintenance, which effects how your bike rides and handles, and which has its own satisfactions..
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
ive done tyre changes on steel rim bikes, but for cbr250/300r its the pro shop with the right equipment.. never having adjusted your chain in 7,700 miles is also a hint for this particular job, which while not 'difficult' does get easier second, third etc, times.. best not learn on alloy wheels..
seriously, the motorcyclist within you should really find and get to know that rear chain and sprockets, and their alignment...
this is real maintenance, which effects how your bike rides and handles, and which has its own satisfactions..
I recently got back from a 3,000 mile trip and before I left the chain free play was still within spec.

In regard to costs I was quoted at $65 & 80 per tire from the two nearby Honda certified dealers which I think is nuts. The pair of Michelin Pilot Street Radial tires I'm buying are $200..

Is it typically this expensive to just have them remove and put on a new tire if you bring them the wheel? I think I would rather fight the task with a friend and risk a few scratches vs spending those additional amounts. I also think I'll be going through my rear tire at least once a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I also just thought about this but I need to check out the auto hobby shop on (military) base and see if they have additional tools that would make changing a tire easier.
 

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There's no doubt you can change the tires if you have a couple spoons, a couple hours, and enough effort. You can watch a few how-to videos on line to get some ideas of how make the tasks easier. One of the best ones I've seen is linked below. Good Luck.
 

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I’ll tackle almost anything automotive/motorcyclical. One thing I won’t do? Change my tires. Even if I buy my own tires, I can get a shop to do it for less than the hassle is worth to me.
 

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In regard to costs I was quoted at $65 & 80 per tire from the two nearby Honda certified dealers which I think is nuts. The pair of Michelin Pilot Street Radial tires I'm buying are $200..

Is it typically this expensive to just have them remove and put on a new tire if you bring them the wheel?
Here in NZ $30 ($20USD) is a typical charge for changing a tyre if you take the wheel and the new tyre into them. So that cost you were quoted is a rip off.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
@airhead thanks for the video I came across that one as well.

From what I was able to see online it used to be around that price here in the US a few years ago but with online tire sales eating away at dealers profits they have increased the prices on getting them swapped out.
 

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I hesitate to pay more than $20 per tire on my car — I would never fork over that much for a motorcycle tire. Shop around and avoid dealers.

I changed my tires for the first time this spring -- check the thread in this forum -- it was a total PITA. After chewing up the bead on the front tire, I took it to a shop that set the tire on the bead for me for free in five minutes.

The other day, that tire lost all air overnight after four months / thousands of miles of no issues. No visible punctures. So either vandalism or my inexperienced install caught up to me.
 

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Well then, you can save some cash and gain one of motorcycling life's most valuable lessons. Order your tires, secure a place to keep you in the dry for a few hours, grab your tools, a helper would be nice, and have at 'em. And maybe most important of all, by the time you've finished both wheels, a cooler of your favorite beverage to celebrate your efforts. :serious:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
So I swapped the front tire on my own but decided to take the rear to a shop. I just popped the front tire onto the bead (my little air compressor couldn’t do the job) when installing the rear tire back on I was running into clearance issues with the wheel spacers, the brake rotor, and the brake system. For the life of me and with two pairs extra hands to hold and guide the wheel I could not figure it out and decided to call it quits because I didn’t want to scratch up or damage the rotor.

I looked online and found a mobile motorcycle mechanic in my area with reasonable prices so he’s coming over tomorrow.

Does anyone have tips or suggestions for the rear wheel installation?

I tried zip tying the brake system to secure it while trying to align the rest and another 1-2 things that failed.
 

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I did the "zip tie method" per Youtube and didn't run into issues with the rear. I'm confused wrt clearance issues?
 

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It's just a case of working out what goes where. Not exactly easy but you get better with practice. Use wooden blocks and spacers to support the wheel when refitting.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
@Zeke my rear spools make it so it's a little tighter if trying to slide the tire directly from the tail of the bike. When I go vertically one of the spacers always finds a way to hit something and when I have theone cleared I couldn't manage to get the other side fitting properly. The only other idea I had would be to drop the bike onto the wheel using the rear stand but I couldn't try it since I didn't have the front installed when i previously had the helping hands.
 

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aaaaah, got it. I needed a helper reinstalling my front wheel recently, but it was mainly because my front stand is helluva sketchy. Annoying you can't 'lock' the steering with the wheel straight ahead.
 

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I have a 4" wide block about a foot long that is just the right thickness for holding my rear wheel at the right height off the ground so that I dont have to worry about trying to hold the weight of the wheel and can concentrate on just pushing it in and holding the various spacers in place. Have the chain hooked over the back of the swing arm out of the way yet ready to throw over the rear sprocket once you have the wheel in the slot and get it pushed right forward so the chain falls over easily. Then you just have to pull the wheel back until the various holes line up and wang the axle through as the block holds the wheel at just the right height for the axle.
Practice makes perfect. :D
 
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