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I am due to have my rear tyre changed within the next 2000 miles. Was considering to take it to Automobile car repair shop that charges $10 to mount and balance a car tire but its probably not worth taking the risk that they will scratch up my rim.


@insertnamehere24: I am surprised to hear that you need new front brake pad in only 7700 miles. I have 2016 with about 8000 miles and Im still on stock brake pad. Here is a nice write-up that @MotoMike made on checking the wear:

https://www.cbr250.net/forum/cbr250-service-maintenance/29913-how-measuring-brake-pad-wear.html

For those that dont want to click the link............ it seems 20k miles is a reasonable service life for the front brake
 

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Im actually considering to buy this cheap tire levers and rim protector bundle from Amazon for $18

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3SJ699/

I know that sounds crazy but I am quite talented at changing bicycle tires since I am an enthusiast of road bikes and ride with a group. I am quite tempted to do it and then to bring the mounted new tire to the Automobile Tire shop and just pay then $5 to balance the tire. Otherwise the motorcycle mechanic I think he wants $30 to do the whole job (If I take off the bad tire and bring it in)
 

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I'm changing the front and rear pads out over the winter. I've had the bike for 39 months and almost 6,500 miles. Never bled the brakes and the front needs it BADLY. So I'll just squeeze out all the fluid, change to stainless steel lines, replace the pads, and fill it up with fresh Motul fluid.
 

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Im actually considering to buy this cheap tire levers and rim protector bundle from Amazon for $18

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3SJ699/

I know that sounds crazy but I am quite talented at changing bicycle tires since I am an enthusiast of road bikes and ride with a group. I am quite tempted to do it and then to bring the mounted new tire to the Automobile Tire shop and just pay then $5 to balance the tire. Otherwise the motorcycle mechanic I think he wants $30 to do the whole job (If I take off the bad tire and bring it in)
I doubt you can beat the price of this kit. If you enjoy the chore, plan an afternoon, and enjoy. The biggest hurdle will be breaking the bead before you completely wear yourself out. The rest is just more of the same.. grunt, groan, and a band aid for a few skinned knuckles. Let us know how things went when you're done.
 

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I'm changing the front and rear pads out over the winter. I've had the bike for 39 months and almost 6,500 miles. Never bled the brakes and the front needs it BADLY. So I'll just squeeze out all the fluid, change to stainless steel lines, replace the pads, and fill it up with fresh Motul fluid.
Good decision on the SS brake lines. IMO, the most cost effective upgrade to the brake system. There are some really good how-to videos on bleeding the lines, with some helpful hints to cut down on the headaches. I also find it easier to plan on allowing more time than I actually need. It's not difficult, but you can't speed the process. Are you planning on using OEM brake pads, or have you decided yet?
 

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@King_Cobra I actually was planning on changing it prematurely because I expected it to be worn down more if it was under 25% I would have changed them. Although I have 7800 miles most of it has been longer trips, with minimal stops and very little city riding. I've abused the front brakes several times in the mountains but if I had to guess there's at least 40% left on the pads.

Also in that amazon kit it doesn't include a bead breaker which is a must if you are going to do it yourself.

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For those that are curious the mobile mechanic came over and was more persuasive with the wheel than I was. I'm sort of ashamed at how quickly he managed to do it and only with two tries. On the positive their prices are a good bit lower than the dealers in my area, they're more convenient, and I can watch/learn from them which is the biggest plus of all.

Went for a 2 hour ride yesterday using an unbalanced front tire with Ride-On Tire Sealant and a balanced rear tire. I did not experience any shaking during my ride at speeds up to 80 mph. The rear tire has 1 oz of weights on it so I plan on adding the sealant and removing .5 oz. After the next ride I will remove the last .5 oz and if anyone is interested can post my results.

I also noticed the Michelin Pilot Street Radial Tires do not have a marker for where the tire valve goes. I looked online and could not find anything about it.
 

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I've decided to do tire replacement this month on my own but I found a good deal for
tire mounting. I want to replace my current stock and try at least a new set of tires. I'm not sure when will I be able to tour again but I can't let this ample of time to do some improvement passed by.
 

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Im actually considering to buy this cheap tire levers and rim protector bundle from Amazon for $18

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01M3SJ699/

I know that sounds crazy but I am quite talented at changing bicycle tires since I am an enthusiast of road bikes and ride with a group. I am quite tempted to do it and then to bring the mounted new tire to the Automobile Tire shop and just pay then $5 to balance the tire. Otherwise the motorcycle mechanic I think he wants $30 to do the whole job (If I take off the bad tire and bring it in)
Changing a bicycle is nothing like changing a motorcycle tire.
Get your tires properly mounted and balanced. Changing a motorcycle tire by hand with primitive tools that only happens in places like Mongolia.
 

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Changing a bicycle is nothing like changing a motorcycle tire.
Get your tires properly mounted and balanced. Changing a motorcycle tire by hand with primitive tools that only happens in places like Mongolia.
And New Zealand! 😄. I see the guys changing tyres at the track with nothing but two tyre levers all the time. It's not a skill I have though. They have a small battery powered compressor that looks more like an over-sized battery drill for popping the beads when they fit the new tyre. Myself, I have two sets of rims both set up with 'dry' tyres so so I dont have to change rubber at the track.

I agree with you though regarding a road going motorcycle. For the cost involved I would go to a bike shop and get them fitted and balanced using a machine. A lot of places cut you a deal on the fitting or do it for free if you buy the rubber off them.
 

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Changing a bicycle is nothing like changing a motorcycle tire.
Get your tires properly mounted and balanced. Changing a motorcycle tire by hand with primitive tools that only happens in places like Mongolia.
And New Zealand! 😄.
And backwoods US. I've changed numerous motorcycle tires over the past 50 years. After every set, I've sworn next time around I'd pay someone else to do them. In another 4-5 K miles... I'll find out if my short memory or sore hands win out this time around. :rolleyes:
 

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I'm lucky that my local tyre shop (part of a national chain) will change my bike tyres for free. They are very careful with the wheels and have been changing my bike tyres for some time. We have three cars and a motorhome (RV) that they do our tyres for so we are good customers. I take the bike wheels out and toddle along to the tyre shop with my new tyre and they remove the old and fit the new. For balancing I use DYNABEADS. They are a US company so should be readily available over the pond and elsewhere. They are poured in through the valve stem then the valve core is refitted and the tyre inflated. They give perfect balance without weights. They can be collected out of the old tyre and re-used in the new. Worth looking them up online and reading their write-up.
 

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I'm lucky that my local tyre shop (part of a national chain) will change my bike tyres for free. They are very careful with the wheels and have been changing my bike tyres for some time. We have three cars and a motorhome (RV) that they do our tyres for so we are good customers. I take the bike wheels out and toddle along to the tyre shop with my new tyre and they remove the old and fit the new. For balancing I use DYNABEADS. They are a US company so should be readily available over the pond and elsewhere. They are poured in through the valve stem then the valve core is refitted and the tyre inflated. They give perfect balance without weights. They can be collected out of the old tyre and re-used in the new. Worth looking them up online and reading their write-up.
Interesting, I've heard of them. I googled them and this was the first article I got: Dyna Beads: Miracle Balancing Cure or Tire Snake Oil?
Then I read the comments section at the very bottom of the page and (typical of the internet) came away more unsure than ever! :giggle:

I balance my own tyres using a spindle running on bearings. I quite enjoy taking my time and getting them perfect, such is my nature.
 

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The concept of floating beads or some sort of semi-liquid substance for tire balancing has been around for some time.. not only for motorcycles, but tires as large as semi-truck use. I've heard of results ranging from stellar to no help at all. I suspect the truth lies somewhere in between. At least there's no worry of throwing off a wheel weight while riding on a rough patch of road.
 
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