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Hello,
I am new member and 4 weeks ago purchased a 2021 CB300R. I am new rider but have two years of trail experience in KTM 125 2-stroke. I absolutely love my new Honda and cannot think of any mods I want to do.
Here is my silly question. I use the red emergency off button when I turn off bike. Should I not use and only shut off with key and not button? I read in manual and it says only shut off with emergency button in emergency. Maybe they say that so we don’t forget to turn off to save battery. Just curious if I should use key or can keep using the red on button to turn off motor. thank you! 2WD Roll Tide!!
 

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I've always used the ignition key, but I've never heard it's harmful to use the kill switch. In an emergency, I'd need to make a conscience effort to find the kill switch, while you'd be on it immediately. As long as you remember the ignition at the same time, I don't see any downside. Maybe some one more technically minded will chime in... I'm just too lazy to add another chore.
 

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For day to day use switch off with the key. You don't forget and leave something on, grips etc. There is no problem turning off with the killswitch but you stand the change of leaving something switched on and draining your battery. You will also wonder why it won't start next time you come to use it but eventually you'll remember the kill switch.:D
 

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I owned a Triumph Striple for a year and failures of the charging system components were attributed to regular use of the kill switch to shut the engine off. I have always used the key except on my dirt bikes(dedicated mx and hare scramble) where there was only a kill switch.
 

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2017 Honda CB300FAH (ABS)
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I always use the key. I don't think using the kill switch is bad but, if you do, there's a risk of leaving the key in the on position and running down the battery (because the light's on) or leaving the kill switch in the off position and wondering why the bike won't start next time out.

Ari Henning pretty much says it all: Debunking the Motorcycle Kill-Switch Mystery | MC Garage - YouTube
 

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hi mbjenkins, the leaving the key in the switch was mentioned often too. I think I'm ingrained with removing the key out of fear the bike will be stolen. Also, back when I started riding, I don't think kill switches were standard equipment (circa 1971).
 

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The kill switch on the right handle bar was never put there as a device to use as a turn off it's purpose goes back to the late 60's when Honda was sued because the bike owner could not reduce speed my turning the Throttle off -- slide carb's-- and when dirty would stick-same thing with the position of the key from the side to the top-same thing with first a rubber tab that would make the side stand pop up than it was a light than the bike as now will not start with the side stand down-back than Honda was very large as now and was a good punching bag for law suits-how do I know all this-in 1970 I was brought in front of a federal juge with all my diploma's and extensive resume and after alot of questioning I was given the title as a expect in all manner of motorcycles -point is I use to testify in these trials-alot of fun--after this the federal government of the USA got involved and made the switch manitory-than other countrys did the same-and so it goes- so do not use this swith as a turn off because it does not turn the total electricity off and will kill the battery
 

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The kill switch is really only an emergency device in case of problems stopping the motor. Years ago we used to open the decompresion valve, also used sometimes when kickstarting.:rolleyes: Do it properly and switch off with the key: it will save you a problem at some stage in your riding carreer.
 

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I was instructed to use the cut-off switch from day 1, at the basic MSF course. They chided us not to use the key. There is no difference in outcome between the ignition and switch (given you remove the key in either case), and using the switch turns off the motorcycle without the need for removing a hand from the handlebars. The cut-off switch originates as a safety measure like motorboy said.
 
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