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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Thought you guys might like to see this. I know this thread is mainly about the "Michelin" brand tire but I found this about the IRC brand...

IRC TIRE MOTORCYCLE TIRE OFFICIAL SITE | COMMUTER | RX-01 stock tire on our bikes... RX-1

IRC TIRE MOTORCYCLE TIRE OFFICIAL SITE | COMMUTER | RX-02 A version of our stock tire..RX-2

IRC TIRE MOTORCYCLE TIRE OFFICIAL SITE | COMMUTER | RX-01 SPEC R "Race " Version RX-1 Spec- R (Perhaps this used in the 300 Dream Cup in Thailand)

I did not realize that there were other "versions" of the RX-1 OEM tire.
 

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year of manufacture

According to the IRC website... it shows that RX-01's are "OE" for our bike ans many others...just saying. Maybe you got lucky...
Been trying to look for year of manufacture tags on the IRC RX-01's. Can seem to find it on the side of the tyre. Where should I look? When one shops online for replacement tyres is there a way of knowing when they were manufactured before buying them? I was told that they have a shelf life of like 5 years, so I should avoid buying old tyres.
 

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Not seen a thread on this yet, anyone seen/done mileage studies comparing IRCs, Pirelli Rosso II, Michelin Street Radials, Bridgestone S20 or Shinko SR 880/881. I assume results would vary depending on aggressiveness of riding style. I have no intention of replacing my tyres now, but doing my due diligence early.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tire_code

DOT code: All tires for use in the USA have the DOT code, as required by the Department of Transportation (DOT). It specifies the company, factory, mold, batch, and date of production (two digits for week of the year plus two digits for year; or two digits for week of the year plus one digit for year for tires made prior to 2000). Although not law, some tire manufacturers do not

suggest using a "new" tire that has been sitting on the shelf for more than six years (Ford Motor Company) or 10 years (Cooper Tire citing a tire association recommendation).[19] JATMA, the Japanese Automotive Tyre Manufacturers Association recommends that all tires be inspected at five years, and all tires that were manufactured more than ten years previous be replaced.[20]

A number of people have commented on line about the IRC tires being "crap" . Now one member on our Forum (Kiwi Rider) has had his 300 R to the track many times and found the stock tires pretty good.
 
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It's entirely possible that tires, or tyres manufactured for distribution to countries other than the U.S., may not have DOT codes, date codes, or other markings specific to that particular tire. I'm sure that it costs a tire manufacturer some amount of money to comply with U.S. DOT standards and regulations, so if they don't need to do so for tires shipped to other markets they probably won't.

Just as there are tires that are not available in the U.S., and which are made for other markets... I recall awhile back someone from Thailand posting on the CBR250.net forum about a particular Pirelli motorcycle tire which as it turned out, wasn't available in the U.S.
 

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It's entirely possible that tires, or tyres manufactured for distribution to countries other than the U.S., may not have DOT codes, date codes, or other markings specific to that particular tire. I'm sure that it costs a tire manufacturer some amount of money to comply with U.S. DOT standards and regulations, so if they don't need to do so for tires shipped to other markets they probably won't.

Just as there are tires that are not available in the U.S., and which are made for other markets... I recall awhile back someone from Thailand posting on the CBR250.net forum about a particular Pirelli motorcycle tire which as it turned out, wasn't available in the U.S.
In the UK all tires have to have the dot on them giving the year they were made. Speed rating. profile, size etc.
 

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Not seen a thread on this yet, anyone seen/done mileage studies comparing IRCs, Pirelli Rosso II, Michelin Street Radials, Bridgestone S20 or Shinko SR 880/881. I assume results would vary depending on aggressiveness of riding style. I have no intention of replacing my tyres now, but doing my due diligence early.
Think the Michelin Street Radials will be the longest lasting and good/great in wet too.
 

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Not seen a thread on this yet, anyone seen/done mileage studies comparing IRCs, Pirelli Rosso II, Michelin Street Radials, Bridgestone S20 or Shinko SR 880/881.
This is the best I know of as they were comparing brand new with brand new. One of the factors that makes people go "Wow, these brand XXX tyres are amazing etc etc " is because they have just taken off a set of worn out tyres that would make any bike handle like crap and slip in the wet.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHnmukUJ7aQ

A number of people have commented on line about the IRC tires being "crap" . Now one member on our Forum (Kiwi Rider) has had his 300 R to the track many times and found the stock tires pretty good.
That's right Laurie, I did four track days using the OEM IRC's and pushed them harder than I ever did on the road. Interestingly one of those days we had rain for the morning session and I think even then I only got one small slide from the rear. I never got them to slide in the dry but they gummed up and started shredding pretty quick on a hot day.
Ive now got 4K miles on my Michelin radials and whilst they are a step up from the IRC's, the difference is not light years. The IRC's are a decent tire esp by OEM standards.
 

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I can't really judge the IRCs for grip because I don't push very hard (probably not more than 65% on the road, if that makes sense), but I find them perfectly acceptable in terms of ride quality, feedback etc.
 

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They grip more than i have pushed them. Will test them at the track next month.
I can use all of the (rear) tyre's width easily enough, on the slow corners at least, but I'm not pushing the rubber near its limit.
 

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For a gauge of mileage you can expect out of the IRC's I got 13,500km (8.4K miles) out of mine with a mix of touring and hard sports riding, no commuting.
The rear was absolutely shagged tho (canvas showing) and the front about a good two thirds worn on the sides.
 
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I can use all of the (rear) tyre's width easily enough, on the slow corners at least, but I'm not pushing the rubber near its limit.
yeah i'm sure i'm nowhere near the limits of the tyre, i've barely felt it squirm. Mind you, i'm not pushing that hard as i know i don't have the skills to test bike tyres.
 

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That's right Laurie, I did four track days using the OEM IRC's and pushed them harder than I ever did on the road. Interestingly one of those days we had rain for the morning session and I think even then I only got one small slide from the rear. I never got them to slide in the dry but they gummed up and started shredding pretty quick on a hot day.
Ive now got 4K miles on my Michelin radials and whilst they are a step up from the IRC's, the difference is not light years. The IRC's are a decent tire esp by OEM standards.
Can you remember what pressure you ran the tyres at the track?
 

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For a gauge of mileage you can expect out of the IRC's I got 13,500km (8.4K miles) out of mine with a mix of touring and hard sports riding, no commuting.
The rear was absolutely shagged tho (canvas showing) and the front about a good two thirds worn on the sides.
Wow, that's great mileage. With our roads being unreliable I don't get to do much spirited riding in the twisties. So could easily get more out of the tyres as a commuter.
 
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The only time I have replaced a tyre that wasn't squared-off was on my GSX1100F. The front had worn more on the sides than the middle, resulting in a pointy profile that felt really unstable. Because this happened over a period of time, it took me a while to realise something wasn't right, but when I replaced the tyres it felt like a new bike.
 

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That's right Laurie, I did four track days using the OEM IRC's and pushed them harder than I ever did on the road. Interestingly one of those days we had rain for the morning session and I think even then I only got one small slide from the rear. I never got them to slide in the dry but they gummed up and started shredding pretty quick on a hot day.
Ive now got 4K miles on my Michelin radials and whilst they are a step up from the IRC's, the difference is not light years. The IRC's are a decent tire esp by OEM standards.
How long did your IRC tyres take to warm up on your track days? My back tyre was doing the slip-n-slide last week on the twisties.
 

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How long did your IRC tyres take to warm up on your track days? My back tyre was doing the slip-n-slide last week on the twisties.
No longer than any other tyre, probably a good 10 minutes at speed. I was going to say it's probably because of the cold late winter roads but then I remembered you are in Kenya!
Smooth shiney seal will be slippery esp if you haven't had rain for a while.
Either that or your just a demon rider pushing the outer limits of tyre grip. :D
 

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stock on cbr250r [+4yrs ago] were ok generally but sensitive to
wet esp road paint and off camber etc..
replaced with pirelli sd's which were overall 'better'..
[lean-in, stability, clean steering, calm in the wet etc]
stock on cbr300r year or two back were 'better',
nicer profile [similar to pirelli sd's] for better
steering generally ['thinking' it in, and thru']
and stable under very strong braking..

so irc's have improved imo, and without doubt
adequate for general riding including track days
as members have advised, some swearing by them..
but, imo pirelli sd's are better again overall..

for novices or inexperienced [and rational] riders
the irc's will do the job.. later tho, its worth
considering other brands and profiles etc, as well..
imo and experience pirelli sd's are great for a bias ply
tyre.. and will outride most riders..

intended to replace irc's with [michelin] radials,
tho unavailable last moment, so went for 2nd
choice the pirellis.. radials no doubt have
their advantages, but so do bias ply tyres..

nice 'problem to have'...
 
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