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Has anyone here installed a lowering link on the CB300f? I'm very new to motorcycles (still haven't purchased one, but I know it's gonna be a 300f) and I'm not sure how hard it is to install the link with the kickstand. I've sat on a Cb300f before and I was tiptoeing it, but I'm not sure if I should consider the lowering link or the lowered seat that Honda offers. My inseam is 29in on a good day lmao
 

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With a 29" inseam you should have no problem getting your feet down. I have a CBR300 and with a 28" inseam I manage to get my feet flat. (I have a longish body and shortish legs). If you do have to go down the lowering route you would have to shorten the sidestand or it would be too upright and unstable.
 

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I'm 5' 8.75" with a 30" inseam.

I have a CB300F with the "Low Seat" accessory installed and have no problem flat-footing the bike at a stop (with left foot, as I keep my right foot on the rear brake) with plenty of reach to spare.
 

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i have a 28 inch inseam and a 300f and I’m tiptoeing it even with the factory honda lowered seat, luckily when i bought the bike it came with both the low and original seat. There’s a well reviewed italian upholstery guy who works out of his garage that i’m taking the original seat to so I can have it shaved and sculpted based on the corbin seat for oir bikes, except much lower.

also, the cbr’s seem tobe significantly lower, my coworker has one and it’s a lot more comfortable when i throw a leg over it. But i like the standard stance when riding
 

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I'm only 29" inseam, but was fine with just the seat foam scooped out a little (remove cover, carve with breadknife, restaple - pretty easy, albeit I have an air powered stapler!). Anyway, my wife wants to learn to ride and and she has a similar leg length. She wanted the bike lower than just the foam scooping, hence my lowering this morning. I have previously lowered a CBR250R by lengthening the "dog bones" by 20mm and that was too much, so I have lengthened by only 10mm this time, giving a (not measured, sorry) drop of about 2cm or so. I have brought the fork legs at the front through the yokes 20mmm to match. This amount lowers the bike without ruining its stance too much.

I am very pleased with how it has come out. It means that my wife is now fully on the balls of her feet, as am I (in fact half way between balls of feet and being flat footed), so now easy to manouvere in car parks, etc.This is my daily commuter bike so that is actually quite important and makes it much more usable for me too.

Being too mean to buy special longer dogbones, I have just lengthened the stock ones. To get them out is fairly easy: put axle stands under the front footpeg brackets (I man-handled the bike whilst my wife popped the stands into place). With that done I chocked underneath the the rear wheel (I used planks of wood) so that it is supported. You can then remove the exhaust, to get access to the "dog bones" bolts, crack the bolts off and remove them. Once they are lengthened refitting is also easy but you will need to lever the rear wheel higher to a accommodate the longer "dog bones". I simply used the top plank under the wheel as a lever and chocked it in the higher position once all the holes were lined up.

The pictures below show what I did - essentially cutting, inserting a 1cm piece of bar and seam welding. Then grinding back flat and welding another longer piece of equally thick bar up the inside for guaranteed strength; seam welding that all of the way around too. I am an amateur stick welder (that's all I have - mig and tig not common out here in Thailand, and stupidly expensive). Anyway, it may not be beautiful, but the welds are fully penetrated and strong. It is stronger than before I cut it - the belt and braces approach!!

I know people are going to be complaining at the appearance/welding, but I know that they are strong as hell, and I didn't want to waste more time on the appearance of something that lives under the bike. In reality nobody will pay them any attention at all. Maybe Ishould add some dirty oil and dirt on them, lol. I should have mentioned I also had to shorten the stand a little - I just cut of the foot, removed a slice of 1cm or so and welded back on. It's fine like that.

Total cost essentially zero, and bike lowered and ready to ride! If I ever want to put it back a brand new "dog bones" from Honda is $20 here - a lot cheaper than modified ones that I could've bought to do this.

Also... on the fifth picture you can see my risers. They were very cheap ($7) off Lazada Thailand and raise by 30mm, whilst bringing closer to the rider by about 15mm. I love them It makes the riding position akin to that of a CB500X - good for us folks who aren't getting any younger.

LATE UPDATE: Post test-ride I have now dropped the forks back down through the yokes by 6mm, meaning that they are now only extended 14mm further than stock; not the 20mm as shown on the photo. 6mm doesn't sound much but makes a remarkably big difference and the stance feels much more correct now (at 20mm it felt slightly tilted down at the front). I didn't realise I was so sensitive ;-)


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I should've added - for those risers to work I had to remove both of the cable guides and also slightly reroute the clutch cable as it comes up across the engine. No biggie, but you have to do it to rise by that much...
 

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LATE LATE Update: It appears, after a night time ride, that I am not sensitive at all and the bike is now tilted backwards slightly, with my headlights slightly dazzling oncoming traffic. Nonetheless, I like it this way, it feels good, so I have just adjusted the headlights down. For anyone attempting this I still suggest no more than 15mm of forks up through the yokes, BUT, if you want the "correct" stance then extend the dogbones by only 7 or 8mm, is my best estimate. Personally I am happy with the 10mm extension and slightly "incorrect' stance - it looks and feels fine and is so easy to hop on and off and manouvere...

Hopefully the height and seating position can stay like this for some time. I am done!
 

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LATE LATE Update: It appears, after a night time ride, that I am not sensitive at all and the bike is now tilted backwards slightly, with my headlights slightly dazzling oncoming traffic. Nonetheless, I like it this way, it feels good, so I have just adjusted the headlights down. For anyone attempting this I still suggest no more than 15mm of forks up through the yokes, BUT, if you want the "correct" stance then extend the dogbones by only 7 or 8mm, is my best estimate. Personally I am happy with the 10mm extension and slightly "incorrect' stance - it looks and feels fine and is so easy to hop on and off and manouvere...
The dog bone length is quite sensitive. On the SV's it's ratio of about 3 or 4 :1 dogbone length change to ride height change. I shortened mine by 4mm to try and improve turn in response at the track (shorter bone jacks the rear end up), but even that small amount was too much and the front end wanted to 'tuck' on slow tight corners. So I went back to stock. Handling not so critical for commuter bike though!
 

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The dog bone length is quite sensitive. On the SV's it's ratio of about 3 or 4 :1 dogbone length change to ride height change. I shortened mine by 4mm to try and improve turn in response at the track (shorter bone jacks the rear end up), but even that small amount was too much and the front end wanted to 'tuck' on slow tight corners. So I went back to stock. Handling not so critical for commuter bike though!
Yes, not so critical indeed - and it feels fine, but it certainly does seem to be a 3 or 4 to 1 ratio. I estimate about a 30mm drop, as your figures would suggest. All good though! ;-)
 
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