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Hi all! What could I do to make my ‘15 300F lighter? I already have a lighter exhaust installed
 

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Buy a CB300R and lose 33 lbs --no really the muffler is the heaviest part because the catalyst converter is in it-that's good for a reduction of about 10lbs anything else is going to be and ounce here and ounce there-unless you want to spend big bucks for a fancy new lighter battery
 

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After a slip on muffler reciprocating weight is the best place to start. Lightweight chain, aluminum rear sprocket, rear brake disc and associated hardware helps a lot. For each pound of reciprocating weight removed is equal to 10 pounds of static weight. Greatly helps with acceleration, braking and handling. On the 300 you could spend $1000 on a tune and maybe gain 3 hp. Better off reducing weight to help the power to weight ratio. Got my track day CBR300r down to 297 pounds with a half tank of gas, made a huge difference in handling and lots more fun to ride. Stock is 357 pounds with a full tank.

I have extra parts for sale here Track Day Parts for sale

Plus a 4 year old lithium batter and charger, it's always held a charge, never needed the trickle charger so it's essentially brand new. Sell for $40
For faster reply email me at [email protected]
 

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Hi all! What could I do to make my ‘15 300F lighter? I already have a lighter exhaust installed
Gawd, the bike is too light as is (for ME, anyway). In fact, that's the only complaint I have with it. But hey, to each his own. No disrespect intended. Just a matter of preference.
 

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Gawd, the bike is too light as is (for ME, anyway). In fact, that's the only complaint I have with it. But hey, to each his own. No disrespect intended. Just a matter of preference.
No offence taken.
For a street bike I understand having a heavier bike is good for not getting blown off the road by a cross wind.
On the track though it's all about power to weight ratio. Track Days with a bunch of tuned R3 making almost twice the horsepower I needed to shave every gram possible to run with them. That and it's fun to tinker with the baby CBR.
Helmet Tire Wheel Sports gear Motorcycle
 

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No offence taken.
For a street bike I understand having a heavier bike is good for not getting blown off the road by a cross wind.
On the track though it's all about power to weight ratio. Track Days with a bunch of tuned R3 making almost twice the horsepower I needed to shave every gram possible to run with them. That and it's fun to tinker with the baby CBR. View attachment 35079
Sounds like a great David and Goliath type battle and probably a lot of fun. I did a couple of track days on my CBR300R but never raced it proper. I always wondered how it would go with a decent suspension set up and some sticky rubber. One thing that impressed me with that bikes handling was that you could ride it quite comfortably to the limits of ground clearance and tyre grip but it never lost its composure. Quite confidence inspiring. I also enjoyed watching clips of Ari Henning racing one at full noise.
Did you ever manage to head off any of those R3's?
 

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Sounds like a great David and Goliath type battle and probably a lot of fun. I did a couple of track days on my CBR300R but never raced it proper. I always wondered how it would go with a decent suspension set up and some sticky rubber. One thing that impressed me with that bikes handling was that you could ride it quite comfortably to the limits of ground clearance and tyre grip but it never lost its composure. Quite confidence inspiring. I also enjoyed watching clips of Ari Henning racing one at full noise.
Did you ever manage to head off any of those R3's?
Hey Kiwi,
The forum and many of your post were very helpful in getting my bike up to speed. Thanks for all the great tips.

Not to many R3 could get by me. With 12 to 20 bikes on track I was consistently in the top 3 lap times. Although not technically racing because it was a track day, we were racing and we all knew each others lap times. It all came down to rider skill at this level, many years of practice made most of the difference to be honest.
We rode a small 1 mile track with 18 turns. Lots of fun mixing it up, with many bikes and riders being fairly equal it was pack racing at it's best.
The baby CBR held it's own until the straightaways where the R3's could pull away. With sticky Pirelli tires, lots of corners and plenty of ground clearance (even had to cut off the kickstand) this is where the CBR shined. Look at the last photo, two R3, knees on the ground, doing all they can to make the corner. I'm not even hanging a knee and about to cut under a professionally build R3 ahead of me. Just not going fast enough here to need a knee drag. Those guys hated me, I loved it!
Ari was my inspiration.
 

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No offence taken.
For a street bike I understand having a heavier bike is good for not getting blown off the road by a cross wind.
On the track though it's all about power to weight ratio. Track Days with a bunch of tuned R3 making almost twice the horsepower I needed to shave every gram possible to run with them. That and it's fun to tinker with the baby CBR. View attachment 35079
Hey Kiwi,
The forum and many of your post were very helpful in getting my bike up to speed. Thanks for all the great tips.

Not to many R3 could get by me. With 12 to 20 bikes on track I was consistently in the top 3 lap times. Although not technically racing because it was a track day, we were racing and we all knew each others lap times. It all came down to rider skill at this level, many years of practice made most of the difference to be honest.
We rode a small 1 mile track with 18 turns. Lots of fun mixing it up, with many bikes and riders being fairly equal it was pack racing at it's best.
The baby CBR held it's own until the straightaways where the R3's could pull away. With sticky Pirelli tires, lots of corners and plenty of ground clearance (even had to cut off the kickstand) this is where the CBR shined. Look at the last photo, two R3, knees on the ground, doing all they can to make the corner. I'm not even hanging a knee and about to cut under a professionally build R3 ahead of me. Just not going fast enough here to need a knee drag. Those guys hated me, I loved it!
Ari was my inspiration.
Hey 344speed,
Good point about track vs. street in terms of bike weight. I haven't owned or even ridden a bike in about 30 yrs. Back when I had my Honda 500 ASCOT, I went riding with a very experienced and long-time bike rider. He had something like a Suzuki or Yamaha 800 (really don't renember). We pulled over and exchanged bikes and man, what a difference in feel. This had NOTHING WHATSOEVER to do with the bigger engine... I just felt so much more CONFIDENT leaning it into the curves on this winding country road we were riding on.
When we finally called it a day, and I related the different and enjoyable feel that his bike left me with, and the sudden confidence I experienced. I admitted to him that I was very
baffled why this was. He laughed and said,
"I can tell you EXACTLY why you felt that. It was because my bike is heavier than yours, so it felt more stable". I definitely believed him because, as I said before, my buddy (who has sinced passed away) was very knowledgeable about bikes and had tons of experience riding and racing (his parents owned a bike dealership, so he had been riding since he was a little kid). Sorry for long text, but wanted to tell you the reasoning behind that opinion concerning the CB300's light weight. Thnx!
COOL PIC, BY THE WAY!!!
 

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Hey Kiwi,
The forum and many of your post were very helpful in getting my bike up to speed. Thanks for all the great tips.

Not to many R3 could get by me. With 12 to 20 bikes on track I was consistently in the top 3 lap times. Although not technically racing because it was a track day, we were racing and we all knew each others lap times. It all came down to rider skill at this level, many years of practice made most of the difference to be honest.
We rode a small 1 mile track with 18 turns. Lots of fun mixing it up, with many bikes and riders being fairly equal it was pack racing at it's best.
The baby CBR held it's own until the straightaways where the R3's could pull away. With sticky Pirelli tires, lots of corners and plenty of ground clearance (even had to cut off the kickstand) this is where the CBR shined. Look at the last photo, two R3, knees on the ground, doing all they can to make the corner. I'm not even hanging a knee and about to cut under a professionally build R3 ahead of me. Just not going fast enough here to need a knee drag. Those guys hated me, I loved it!
Ari was my inspiration.
Sounds like a real hoot and my sort of racing, envious! Yes I noticed the more old school racing posture in the photo, whatever works eh. Sounds like you had a lot of fun showing up those R3 riders.
Ever since the (lighter) CB300R came out I’ve had an idea that it would be a cool bike to use as a base for a race build. Possibly the USD forks would have less flex too. Did you do any motor mods?
 

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Ever since the (lighter) CB300R came out I’ve had an idea that it would be a cool bike to use as a base for a race build. Possibly the USD forks would have less flex too. Did you do any motor mods?
kiwi- now I have the CB300R instead of the CXBR300 I can confirm the forks are much better even though I put progressives in the CBR. Front end now is far better, no more diving on hard braking. Even better is the no diving when touching the front brake while moving very slowly.
 

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Sounds like a real hoot and my sort of racing, envious! Yes I noticed the more old school racing posture in the photo, whatever works eh. Sounds like you had a lot of fun showing up those R3 riders.
Ever since the (lighter) CB300R came out I’ve had an idea that it would be a cool bike to use as a base for a race build. Possibly the USD forks would have less flex too. Did you do any motor mods?
Most corners are done dragging a knee, just not needed at the relativity slow corner speed of my buddy Randell ahead of me and Issac behind me in this picture. That's why I like this picture, only hang off when needed.

As for engine mods, not a lot really. A dyno tune made biggest difference. Didn't gain any horsepower, but the curve held power for longer and throttle response was a 1000 times better. A Power Commander V was preferred by my dyno guy, getting a proper tune really helped, worth every penny. Besides the dyno tune there was a easy air box mod and light porting of intake tract. A better K&N air filter, and a manual cam chain adjuster. That's it besides good maintenance. Checked valve lash every off season, new spark plug at the same time. Frequent oil changes done every 300 miles. Same time rear tire was worn out. Front tires lasted 600 miles. This was one of the biggest expenses of track riding. 4 rear tires and 2 fronts every season adds up fast. . These tires made the biggest change in lap timesDIABLO™ SUPERCORSA SP | Motorcycle | Pirelli

Everyone should try a track day, great way to improve riding skills in a safe environment. I learned more in one track day than a whole year on the street. And no cops, cars or wildlife to worry about. If you miss a corner, just ride into the grass, get back on and do better next lap. Around here in Minnesota this is the track day operator. Home


Going for the pass on a R6. Can't do it that close on the street without ending up in the hospital, or worse.
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kiwi- now I have the CB300R instead of the CXBR300 I can confirm the forks are much better even though I put progressives in the CBR. Front end now is far better, no more diving on hard braking. Even better is the no diving when touching the front brake while moving very slowly.
Thanks for that, good to hear the excessive dive has been addressed. Could be good project bike for me in the future when they get a bit cheaper 2nd hand.
 

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Most corners are done dragging a knee, just not needed at the relativity slow corner speed of my buddy Randell ahead of me and Issac behind me in this picture. That's why I like this picture, only hang off when needed.

As for engine mods, not a lot really. A dyno tune made biggest difference. Didn't gain any horsepower, but the curve held power for longer and throttle response was a 1000 times better. A Power Commander V was preferred by my dyno guy, getting a proper tune really helped, worth every penny. Besides the dyno tune there was a easy air box mod and light porting of intake tract. A better K&N air filter, and a manual cam chain adjuster. That's it besides good maintenance. Checked valve lash every off season, new spark plug at the same time. Frequent oil changes done every 300 miles. Same time rear tire was worn out. Front tires lasted 600 miles. This was one of the biggest expenses of track riding. 4 rear tires and 2 fronts every season adds up fast. . These tires made the biggest change in lap timesDIABLO™ SUPERCORSA SP | Motorcycle | Pirelli

Everyone should try a track day, great way to improve riding skills in a safe environment. I learned more in one track day than a whole year on the street. And no cops, cars or wildlife to worry about. If you miss a corner, just ride into the grass, get back on and do better next lap. Around here in Minnesota this is the track day operator. Home


Going for the pass on a R6. Can't do it that close on the street without ending up in the hospital, or worse.
View attachment 35081
Thanks for the extra info. Sounds like you struck a nice balance between crisping the performance up a bit and keeping it reliable.
I agree with you comments on track riding and the benefits of. I’ve continued with my racing (I started a thread on here somewhere years ago) and, after a number of wins locally, I have had a crack at the National Championship the last three seasons in the Pro Twins class. My results have been 19th, 15th and 10th so despite getting older I am getting faster as I hone the craft. Best thing I ever got into, love it. (y)
 

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Thanks for the extra info. Sounds like you struck a nice balance between crisping the performance up a bit and keeping it reliable.
I agree with you comments on track riding and the benefits of. I’ve continued with my racing (I started a thread on here somewhere years ago) and, after a number of wins locally, I have had a crack at the National Championship the last three seasons in the Pro Twins class. My results have been 19th, 15th and 10th so despite getting older I am getting faster as I hone the craft. Best thing I ever got into, love it. (y)

Hey Kiwi,
Couple questions if I may,
What's your current ride, an SV?
You gave up on the Yamaha experiment if I remember correctly, was that an older 400?
How many tracks do you ride in New Zealand, or how many are there?
What age group do you fall in?
I'm 57 and have hung it up.....for now.
Was a one track man, might explain why lap times were so good, LOL.

Here is the next picture taken 1 second after the last picture in previous post. No touching, no one got hurt, all in good fun, for a thrill seeker, still makes me laugh.
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Haha, yeah that happens occasionally!
I’m 52 now, we don’t have any age brackets here in NZ. A good racing buddy of mine who has 10 more years on me punts a V4 Ducati in the F1 class so there’s hope yet.
There’s 6 main motorcycle tracks in NZ, I’ve raced on 5 of them. Generally the National series covers either 4 or 5 tracks/rounds each summer. It’s a lot of travel, time off work, and cost but it’s worth it for me, at this stage at least. Once I stop getting faster and plateau I may go back to just the provincial series. Yes I race an SV650, Ive got a 2020 model now. This season is going to be the first with the Aprilia 660s so should shake the class up a bit. I have one as a road bike with a view to converting to race in a few years time when the new bike gloss has worn off. :giggle:
 
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