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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you guys deal with this? After market mirrors or what? If so, what do you use?

Kind of annoying. Not a big deal but enough of one to want to fix it :p
 

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I have the same **** problem. Pisses me right off. I've adjusted my mirrors a million different ways and can't make my view any better. Need to search for aftermarket extensions or handlebar end mirrors.
 

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I also see that, though it's not "quite" as annoying for me. I think a pair of 2" extenders would fit the bill, but I've yet to find a good pair...
 

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Back when I had my stock mirrors, I found that pulling the stalks back more was helpful.
Yes, I would tend to agree. Bringing the mirror closer to you, while minimizing moving them inward, may provide a better field of view. I've been considering putting convex mirrors on mine, but don't know if you can get 1" convex mirrors. (Any larger would be too big for the small mirrors on my 250).

Doesn't really help with the view directly behind, however.

Longer mirror arms, in my experience, tend to suffer from vibration much more readily. And now you can't see ANYTHING!
 

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helps to tilt mirrors down, rather than having the top side
parallel to the ground.. sort of like floppy ears on sheep
or whatever..

this gives maximum vertical view between the two
middle points, with about max lateral view
plus the tips dipping down to see cars blinkers
etc in that position..

without doubt mirrors are a compromise on
motorcycle side mirrors.. but you can get
a good workable arrangement to suit your own
height and so on with careful alignments..

motorcycle mirrors are not intended to provide
full rear vision, which would be a distraction
from what we need to see behind and
sidewards when not looking ahead..

you can ride a motorcyle without mirrors,
as some do, [not, recommended] but
you cant ride without looking ahead
and to either side..

it mildly amuses me when some report
annoyance at seeing their elbows in their
mirrors.. while elbows may take up
a small part of the inner reflection,
it takes only a split second to move
your elbow, if complete view is
necessary, which is rare if ever..

with the right attitude, seeing elbows
blocking mirrors correctly aligned
could be feedback on poor elbow
alignment generally..

there are bar-end mirrors which can give
slightly wide angle for mirrors, but
the less the better on bars..
[some swear by them]

also wide screen 'blind spot' mirrors
for mounting onto screens,
and rear view cameras..

which may have their place for some,
but seem more a distraction to me..

like all riding skills, use of mirrors is another
skill, which anyone can improve by simply
doing it with intention, and by repetition..
specifically, learning and teaching your brain
to form an ongoing image of whats behind you
thru ongoing slight glancing without head movement
to mirror images.. this becomes second nature,
and an extention of peripheral vision..

you dont need to actively think thoughts about
where everything is as its a changing reality,
but brain can and will develop an inner
picture of whats happening, including
changes between last glimpse and next..

this is a simple thing, nothing special,
which anyone can develop and use..

but see link for 'blind spot' mirrors
if that makes riding better for you;

Riderscan
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks a lot everyone. Also thanks for the good explanation, Shisoshin. I just like having a very good idea about how close people are behind me, where my escapes are, etc. I don't feel overly distracted by them. I don't think I'd need blind spot mirrors, I turn my head a good amount to check my blind spots, especially when changing lanes. If they are in my blind spot, I might be in their blind spot(when I'm driving a truck, it's difficult to see when motorcyclists are to the front right of me, where the windshield is blocked). I will take a look at the link though, thanks!

Back when I had my stock mirrors, I found that pulling the stalks back more was helpful.

Did you get after market mirrors? If so, how do you like them and can you provide a link? Thanks!
 

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Thanks a lot everyone. Also thanks for the good explanation, Shisoshin. I just like having a very good idea about how close people are behind me, where my escapes are, etc. I don't feel overly distracted by them. I don't think I'd need blind spot mirrors, I turn my head a good amount to check my blind spots, especially when changing lanes. If they are in my blind spot, I might be in their blind spot(when I'm driving a truck, it's difficult to see when motorcyclists are to the front right of me, where the windshield is blocked). I will take a look at the link though, thanks!




Did you get after market mirrors? If so, how do you like them and can you provide a link? Thanks!
Bar end CRG Arrows. They don't fit perfectly with the stock clutch and brake levers, but they are great.
 

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Shisoshin, I like to see who is going to rear end me if I have to stop suddenly! I think knowing how far behind you that person is, is VERY important.
 

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not saying to not be aware of whose behind etc,
which is obviously important..
part of my mirror habit includes knowing what
is behind me as an ongoing awareness..
but aside from a motorcycle sitting immediately
behind you [why group riding staggered is best]
you can still see cars even close behind you..
they take up a road space, upon which roads
dimensions are based..

when approaching a stop or traffic lights
i never, ride mid lane, but always choose
either side to ride in, rather than the oil line,
and also placing me in a better escape
position if something does come from
behind..

if there are lines of traffic stopped ahead
i will filter thru them to the front..
if the way is blocked and impossible to
avoid, i stay there between cars, waiting..
if the first two cars are very close together
and i cant go around them for some reason,
i still stop on the line between them,
that way if a car comes in from behind
im not in its direct line of fire..

being on a motorcycle capable of moving
at will across my road space, its easy,
to move one way or the other
to get a specific look somewhere..

before starting off i always adjust mirrors
to something behind me, just to the left
and right, which gives plenty of view
behind me..

being on a motorcycle i can slide across
my seat a little any time, and move my elbow
if necessary, to read a number plate behind me
or some such if thats necessary..

and i too also do head checks as just another
routine and automatic riding habit..

while bike was in for repairs, i took the bus to yoga,
so sitting there the bus comes out of the junction
and i notice ive done a head check..

of course all riders are individuals and so on
and must do whatever is necessary to ensure
confident safe riding, esp in traffic etc..

my response was/is that we dont need to be
restricted by rear view mirrors..
they are just another tool..
and as they say....

the link to the 180degree screen mirror
wasnt a recommendation, as i see them as
unnecessary and another distraction,
but if someone is seriously concerned
about their rear view, then these are
available and used by some..
 

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Mirrors are a bit of a personal thing but I've converted quiet a few of my bikes to bar-end mirrors as I find them best for me. I like the cafe racer type styling of them as well.
 

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Shisoshin, I do pretty much all the things you mentioned. I certainly agree with you that they all are means to accomplish the same thing.

What I've noticed is they all take TIME. Move my elbow, change my position on the bike, change my position in my lane, shoulder check this way, shoulder check that way, and despite all this the size of my torso hinders my view directly behind me, do I have to do that complete 180° with my head (which gets more difficult with age and stiffness).

I purchased a Toyota Sequoia in December. I was having the same issue. Got tiny little 1.5" convex mirrors. Now at a GLANCE I see EVERYTHING around me. Don't need to turn my head, super fast response time.

Truly, to each their own and I'm glad it works for you. But I LOVE having virtually instantaneous feedback and situational awareness. Particularly in such a quickly changing environment. Especially when on a bike where other drivers seem to take more liberties in encroaching on your space than they would were you in a cager.

Ha…after thinking about this more and more, I've convinced myself I'm going out to get better mirrors ASAP!
 

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I bought risers on ebay around 15 dollars, they lifted the mirrors up and inch or so and placed them out about and inch and a half on each side. cured the view problem, hardly and vibration at the mirror!
 

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How do you guys deal with this? After market mirrors or what? If so, what do you use?

Kind of annoying. Not a big deal but enough of one to want to fix it :p
Sounds like perhaps you simply have your arms sticking out too much. With the typical angle of the handle bars on a sport bike, your forearms should be nearly parallel, as opposed to the "elbows out" position that one might have riding a dirt bike. With this sort of elbows out position, I doubt one would be able to really get the mirrors situated into a good position where you could see anything in the mirrors other than your arms.

To start with, the mirrors need to be properly adjusted to suit your particular 'normal' riding position on the bike, whether that position is fairly upright, moderately leaned forward, or in a full tuck... obviously the mirrors can never be adjusted to one position that will work for all three of those riding postures.

On my 250R, in my normal riding position (moderate lean forward) I have the mirrors adjusted so that I have a good, relatively wide field of view to the rear on each side of the bike... and with the mirrors in that position, I can just see the very edge of the bicep area of my jacket on the inside edge of each mirror.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sounds like perhaps you simply have your arms sticking out too much. With the typical angle of the handle bars on a sport bike, your forearms should be nearly parallel, as opposed to the "elbows out" position that one might have riding a dirt bike. With this sort of elbows out position, I doubt one would be able to really get the mirrors situated into a good position where you could see anything in the mirrors other than your arms.

To start with, the mirrors need to be properly adjusted to suit your particular 'normal' riding position on the bike, whether that position is fairly upright, moderately leaned forward, or in a full tuck... obviously the mirrors can never be adjusted to one position that will work for all three of those riding postures.

On my 250R, in my normal riding position (moderate lean forward) I have the mirrors adjusted so that I have a good, relatively wide field of view to the rear on each side of the bike... and with the mirrors in that position, I can just see the very edge of the bicep area of my jacket on the inside edge of each mirror.
I feel like my arms are too long to not have them bent like they are. I could be wrong. I'm going for a ride in a few minutes and I'll try to sit differently.

I don't have to completely move my arm to see, but I do have to bend it inward to see directly behind me. I can see lanes to the left and right of me without having to move too much though.
 

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Maybe your just one of those lucky guys with a big chest and broad shoulders! Lol :laugh:
 

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we all no doubt adapt to our own body dynamics
and riding habits etc, including mirrors [or none]..
for me its another whole-of-body movement,
albeit subtle, like a whip rather than a chain..

for left headcheck say, instead of just turning my head
on its axis my right shoulder moves forward,
as part of an upper torso partial twist to left,
leafing head and eyes facing front as torso
begins twist, then, already twisted, head
and neck turn left for the check..

the return movement is basically that in reverse..
ie, head returns first, then torso etc follow..
its more sort of a rubbery 'bounce' movement
than an open the door, shut the door thing..

takes very short time and is very smooth,
returning to normal forward vision without
wasting time or breaking brains forward
awareness [enough to make a difference]..

usually in traffic etc, this is an abbreviated head
movement with chin kept down, then eyes,
the way you would take a sly glance left
without moving your head..

try it now - keep looking at a spot on a wall
in front, but move your chin slightly left, keeping
eyes on the spot as lowered chin moves..
until almost watching the spot with peripheral
vision.. now move eyes left, not moving head
or neck futher, but watching with eyes left
in eye sockets..

right eye will be watching your nose, but brain
will filter that out, while your attention
is directed left..

if you want wider view, move neck further left..

if you want a good look behind, allow torso to turn
more by first lifting it out of your pelvis [think of
pressing feet onto pegs] then as you turn your
shoulders around take your left elbow to left knee,
which allows for a good turn and better view..

for a really good look directly behind take left hand
to the seat close behind your left glute and press down,
helping [slight] lift thus release of spinal vertebrae
to facilitate turning, and deliberately up a bit
and back..
this can be practiced at various levels
sitting on the motorcycle..
best with feet on pegs [raise bike to vertical
by chocking under the side stand] for closer
to the actual task as when riding..

all this text,, for actions which take less than
a second to actually do for real[!]
but,, just like other riding skills, most actions
are very similar to actions we already have
from life, but refined for riding uses..

this is one of those natural movements
just looking to the side or around..
but on he motorcycle you are sitting
a certain way, moving in accord with
c of g, holding bar or bars without
placing pressure into them, etc..

so, its another skill that should be practiced,
off the motorcycle, on the motorcycle, then
riding, in quet safe places first, to let it
become a natural, real riding skill..

it is still,,, just looking thru rear view mirror..
or,, still just looking behind you..
on your motorcycle..

on bar-end mirrors which have their place
no doubt, my habit in traffic is to filter
to the front at traffic lights, and otherwise
thru other slow or stopped lines of cars..

i find our fairing mounted moveable mirrors
to be excellent for measuring the gap
where up at the front i can more eadily move
the front wheel and mirrors between cars
mirrors when they are staggered..

if mirrors touch on the way thru, they move,
but dont sent forces into the steering,,
as would be the case if bars, or bar end mirrors
touched anything, including cars/mirrors..

my son has small bar end mirrors on has cb400
hotrod which hardly project out from the bars,
and he has them under, the bar grips..
reckons theyre fine there..

to each their own..
 

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Up Date for this post.. (FYI)

This afternoon I went across the street to my local Honda Powerhouse Dealer. Why..you may ask?
They have a new CBR 250 R still in stock and I measured the length of the mirror "stock" (shaft) and compared it to the new 300 R mirror "stock" (shaft).

The CBR 250 R mirrors are in fact 1(one) inch longer than our stock CBR 300 R mirrors.

Some people may want to switch out their 300 R mirrors to the 250 R mirrors.

BTW if you use the 250 R mirrors with "extenders" that are on E Bay both together should really help with rear view..for those who do not wish to use bar end mirrors.
 

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This afternoon I went across the street to my local Honda Powerhouse Dealer. Why..you may ask?
They have a new CBR 250 R still in stock and I measured the length of the mirror "stock" (shaft) and compared it to the new 300 R mirror "stock" (shaft).

The CBR 250 R mirrors are in fact 1(one) inch longer than our stock CBR 300 R mirrors.

Some people may want to switch out their 300 R mirrors to the 250 R mirrors.

BTW if you use the 250 R mirrors with "extenders" that are on E Bay both together should really help with rear view..for those who do not wish to use bar end mirrors.
Good work mate, Is that the repsol edition you mentioned? Seems like they are having trouble shifting it, price too high maybe?
 
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