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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Everyone,

I'm from Elgin-Middlesex area in Ontario, Canada.

I have not ridden a motorcycle. I bought a CBR300RF yesterday at rediculous price (more on that in the new owner thread I started.) I did not have my license when I bought the bike but I was ready to buy and the deal seemed very sweet.

I had two options:

Option 1. Bring the bike home in my dads trailer and ride it around my neighbourhood, without license or insurance, until next season.

Pros: Delay insurance expense for 6 months. Avoid getting a beginners license.
Cons: Rare chance I get in trouble; consequence of insane insurance prices for the next 6 years and a huge fine.

Option 2:
Pay for a riders license, license plate fees, and insurance in quick order to take the bike home from the dealer.
Pros: No worries and can ride as far as I want to better practice area. Collect insurance experience as early as possible.
Cons: Paid for insurance at the end of our season. Paid for a beginners license that expires before I can take the course to graduate because it's closed for winter.

So I signed the deal with option one. License everything later and trailer it home.

But today I just cracked thinking about how much of a liability I was putting on the table to save money that I will not survive without...

Got my license and insurance today and plan to take the bike home tomorrow with it's own power. I plan to update with a pic.
 

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Can you find a place that teaches how to ride nearby? They would do that on their own bikes, so you will not put yours down.
Check what the local government does for the licenses. Besides "learner's permit + exam at the local DMV (department of motor vehicles) equivalent", there's likely an option "take an official training course".

On your own: watch some teaching youtube videos.
If you know how to drive stick shift on a car (manual), it's the same idea and you will pick that part fast. Else, really get a class... you will save money over repairs (handlebar / clutch or brakes handle, scratches on the bike, lower resell value).

Also wear motorcycle riding gear. ATGATT All the gear all the time. Search for ATGATT on this forum. There's one post from a moderator with a pdf about a woman riding (passenger) without more than a helmet. After that, if you ride without gear, you are on your own...

Do not go on a real road to practice. Ideally: big parking lot without light poles. But a dead end street without traffic could do well too.

Also 300F means no ABS if that's like in the US (only the R has an ABS version). So you really need to learn to brake. Squeeeeeeze sloooooly like said my course instructor. No grabbing, just slowly squeezing. I recommend with 2 fingers only (index and middle), so you will have less strength and will be less likely to grab. Learn to use both brakes too.

Here, I found it Government-approved motorcycle safety courses Get a class, and trash their old student bikes, not your new bike.
 

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there are many worthwhile learning experiences to be had
now, without starting your motorcycle..
everyone wants to get going, to ride, obviously..
but every time you ride, you must mount the bike,
enter into a combined center of gravity with it
and your body, both of which can move..

even just sitting on the bike, with a good attitude,
is an actual and real experience of positions
and movements you will need to be capable of
every time, you ride, and stop again
including every stop light and so on..

just, holding the bike upright, securely,
finding good foot positioning, resting your
upper body weight over the tank, holding bars
with good but relaxed grips, elbows bent etc,
then moving it forward a bit, stopping,
then moving it back again, stopping, and so on,
is excellent practice, and will develop your
center of gravity and balance plus strengthen
many muscles you didnt know existed..

there is heaps of good advice including videos etc
here [uise search box] and such as youtube,
where folks demonstrate how to sit on
start and prepare for, riding..

obviously its handy to have a riding course
and/or other experienced riders to help
demonstrate and advise the many little things
that make riding and control so much better..

even your local motorcycle club would be
well worth joining and being part of,
just for the benefit of experiencing
other keen motorcyclists..

the first thing tho, which might flow from
these basic hints, is a novice frame of mind
from which anything is possible..
and from which you will be able to see
or work out what and how to go about
extending your learning from just,
sitting on your motorcycle,
to riding it safely and well..

while you must plan finances and suchlike
think also of scheduling etc, as another
opportunity, not just a hinderance..
riding a motorcycle is a wonderful
experience if your up for it,,
but its not for everyone..

if youre one of them, one of us,
start from the beginning,
so as to not miss out on anything
and to develop skills from
the ground up...
 

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I am frankly amazed that you had to spend time thinking about this. I couldn't care less about the risks associated with your own liability; riding without training, license or insurance is more about respecting the law and other people's safety.

Combined with a reckless and impulsive nature (buying the bike before any of the above had been thought through), your attitude worries me. I hope that, when you get some training, you don't approach it as just a means to an end - something you have to do to get your permit - but an opportunity to gain the skills and mental approach that will make you a competent and safe rider.

Anything well worth doing, is worth doing well.
 
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I would agree with JNO. There are way too many people that try and teach themselves, heck in almost every video I see on this site the lane positioning is terrible (less Mike scraping a knee going uphill). Go get some rider training from someone who knows what they are doing. Don't be one of those idiots who ride a bike however they want and assume that going the speed limit makes them safe.
 

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Do everything right and responsibly. Then become a rider for life with your fiery passion!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hey guys I appreciate all the tips. The judgment on my personality (for having to decide between basically waiting for the spring to begin proper practice vs paying for insurance to get started on practice with the short time I have remaining in the season) was unnecessary though.

I am fully committed to the ministry approved motorcycle class. I can't take this until the spring. My father has a bike and has many years experience who I will be riding with today. I have studied and aced the proficiency test and take treat this opportunity with respect.

Hope this clarifies those who assume things.

Cheers.
 

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Put the bike in a stall,
buy a ridiculously cheap moped, bicycle, or bicycle with engine assist (usually 33-50cc 2 stroke engines) and ride that around for a while, until the time you can get your license.

You'll learn how to balance a 2 wheeler, ride in traffic, which will greatly reduce your chance on accidents on the 300.
And if you do fall, it'll be less of a loss.
 

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Hey guys I appreciate all the tips. The judgment on my personality (for having to decide between basically waiting for the spring to begin proper practice vs paying for insurance to get started on practice with the short time I have remaining in the season) was unnecessary though.

I am fully committed to the ministry approved motorcycle class. I can't take this until the spring. My father has a bike and has many years experience who I will be riding with today. I have studied and aced the proficiency test and take treat this opportunity with respect.

Hope this clarifies those who assume things.

Cheers.
Nup. No assumptions were necessary. What you actually said was, "Option 1. Bring the bike home in my dads trailer and ride it around my neighbourhood, without license or insurance, until next season."

That would be illegal and irresponsible which, combined with your decision to buy a bike BEFORE you had any training - or even a permit - makes it pretty clear you have a reckless attitude. Additionally, you had no problem sharing this alarming information on a forum.

I suspect you are not a daft as you sound though, and given your father rode bikes, I reckon some of his experiences will have rubbed off on you and you will take biking seriously. Sadly, bikers are no different to car drivers in that they are of all types, from seriously skilled and level-headed role models, to complete idiots. In my experience, an idiot is an idiot, whether in a car, on a bike or on a jetski. Try not to be one of them and I can assure you that you will get much more from biking.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hey guys just checking back in. So I've put about 120km on it since I picked it up yesterday. I graduated up from a small parking lot, to a larger parking lot, and eventually on to the roads. Basically once I was ready to take leave the parking lot we made our way back home. Although there was some busy traffic to get to the country roads, my dad rode behind me as to keep traffic from putting too much pressure on me.

Bluetooth communication in the helmets made it really easy to get coached by my dad as well as ask questions or concerns as they came up.

Today we took the bikes out on the back roads and through small towns. I rode for about 3 hours today practicing. Having driven standard cars for the past 12 years I find the shifting and launching quite easy. I'm still having to remind myself to use my rear brake (doesn't feel natural yet) when slowing down as to communicate with traffic as though someone were behind me.

I'm glad I decided to put the bike on the road right away. I wouldn't have built up my comfort and confidence in parking lots alone even if that option would have saved me a ton of money.

I'm heading out for thanksgiving dinner but I'm opting to drive instead of take the bike since there is a chance it will get dark earlier than I get home. I don't want to feel like I HAVE to ride the bike ever. I believe I will wait to use my bike as a commuter until after the riders course in the spring.

I guess I just wanted to update everyone that I and the bike are safe and unharmed. Although I don't really have much to compare this bike to, I am very pleased with the way it handles and performs.

I do understand people have genuine concerns for other people and I apologize for not being more understanding in my previous post.

Cheers everyone.
 

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....... I'm still having to remind myself to use my rear brake (doesn't feel natural yet) when slowing down as to communicate with traffic as though someone were behind me.......
The brake light is wired to both front and rear brakes, so will illuminate whichever you use. You probably know already that the rear brake doesn't do much, especially on a lightweight bike. Almost all the retardation comes from the front brake. If you bought the non-ABS version, try to use a bit of finesse with the rear as it's easy to lock the wheel if you stomp on it, when all the weight is on the front, especially when the road is wet.

The rear can be used to stabilise the bike in some circumstances, but that's a lesson best left till you have a lot more experience. It's also useful when riding at walking pace and for hill starts.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks JNO. I find I don't use brakes to slow much at all, rather by downshifting. Good to know the front brakes will activate the lights because I do find those very natural. You're right, the rear brake does not feel very effective.

Tomorrow I plan to put another 100 or so km on it just going to visit various friends and family all in the name of practice. I am trying to break in the engine with variable RPM so on long back roads I am downshifting and altering speeds. I did have a pickup truck behind me today, when I ventured out on my own, that wasn't really tolerant about this even though I was not going below the speed limit at any point. I managed to ignore him, went back to maintaining speed, and made the next turn to get him off my back.
 

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....I did have a pickup truck behind me today, when I ventured out on my own, that wasn't really tolerant about this even though I was not going below the speed limit at any point. I managed to ignore him, went back to maintaining speed, and made the next turn to get him off my back.
Perfect. The skills required are not just technical - how to make the bike do what you want - but also mental, including knowing how to identify R soles and letting them go harass somebody else. Good decisions like this can save you a lot of grief. As we older bikers on here have often said, you never know who you're dealing with, so be careful.

You have passed your first test, Grasshopper :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey guys. Still safe and bike is unharmed. I'm really feeling quite natural on it's now compared to the first day. Still have endless practice to do.

I just went out by myself for about 5 hours today. Rode into London and stoped at various friends and families. I used a busy road to get home and I did not get any undue nerves.

I have now 255km on it. Haven't let it stand at the same rpm for much more than a minute or two yet. I want to get as much of this decent weather riding in before the season is over. Once it snows or drops below 0, I'm putting the bike in heated storage until the spring.
 

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Good old London Ontario, Still remember the big woods-ball event I went to up there, not nearly as good as Wasaga Beach but it was a blast. Must be getting chilly there, safe riding.
 
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