Honda CBR 300 Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am not 100% sure how these work, maybe someone can explain it better for me? The end of these cables where the round loop is have a tiny hole on the top side, and the bolt that goes through also has a tiny hole. I can see that in the picture obviously. So when installing you simply align these holes up, the new hose, the bolt and obviously there must be a hole on the actual brake caliper? Is that simply it? Also, is it just a matter of bleeding the brake fluid from the bleeder on the caliper, pumping the brakes till empty. Then installing the hose, refilling and bleeding the air as normal? I just never knew thats how these were set up (a hole in the bolt?) lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Hi
If your just changing lines remove old ones and fit new ones they are called banjo bolts, no need to line up as the hose end will have a concave groove, they should line up the same as the old as the reservoir end and caliper might have two pegs the hose end fits in, tighten to set torque. Now if its a single front disc or rear it should be easyish, you can either use a vacuum pump on it or reverse fill with syringe or keep topping up the reservoir and bleed as normal oh and theirs gravity feeding also, however if air locked the normal way will be a pain, bleed until there are no bubbles at all, tap the caliper and hose lightly while doing it, helps remove stuck bubbles, I then squeeze lever back and zip tie over night. I prefer reverse filling with syringe.
Triple check everything, Ive done a single front disc in less than an hour, twins can be a pain.
If in any doubt get a mechanic to do it, should not cost much really. Mess with brakes at your own risk.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,083 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi
If your just changing lines remove old ones and fit new ones they are called banjo bolts, no need to line up the hose end will have a groove, they should line up the same as the old as the top might have two pegs the hose end fits in, tighten to set torque. Now if its a single front disc or rear it should be easyish, you can either use a vacuum pump on it or reverse fill with syringe or keep topping up the reservoir and bleed as normal oh and theirs gravity feeding also, however if air locked the normal way will be a pain, bleed until there are no bubbles at all, tap the caliper and hose lightly while doing it, helps remove stuck bubbles, I then squeeze lever back and zip tie over night. I prefer reverse filling with syringe.
Triple check everything, Ive done a single front disc in less than an hour, twins can be a pain.
If in any doubt get a mechanic to do it, should not cost much really. Mess with brakes at your own risk.

Mark
Thanks for the help. I'm not worried when it comes to bleeding brakes at all. I've done it many times on cars. It is just the first time on a bike and wasn't familiar with the end of these hoses. I can see now what you are saying about the grooves. btw it is a single caliper front and back
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
Sometimes you may get an air lock at the reservoir, if so you can just crack the banjo bolt at the top an squeeze, then nip it up to torque again. Should be very straight forward, make sure its all spotless.

Mark
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,454 Posts
Just yesterday I was trying to get an airlock out of mates hydraulic clutch on his Aprilia and we bleed and bleed it down at the bleed nipple on the engine casing to no avail. So in the end we did what Mark says and cracked the banjo bolt up on the handle bar end (with rags to catch the drips!) and whamo, instantly we had resistance at the clutch lever again and an operational bike. Good advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
One other thing, if your brakes are a bit **** and you have bleed them ,cleaned the pistons or even replaced the lines, don't forget the caliper sliders, lube them with red rubber grease, I had this problem on the CG and once lubed and grease worked in they were great for a single piston, probably never lubed properly from new, one of those forgotten things like swing arm bearings.

Mark
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top