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Discussion Starter #1
Have owned motorcycles from 80cc to 1300cc.

Very inspired by the CBR300R so I have joined the forum to learn more about this model and I'm seriously considering a purchase.

I've been looking at bikes from the new Kawasaki 250cc machines that are coming out next year to the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer. I'm keen to get a ride on the new Yamaha YZF-R3 next year and compare it to the Honda CBR500R. In the meantime I'd like to seriously consider buying a CBR300R :) .






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I compared here and there, but I felt at home with the CBR. No regrets on my part, and my my expectations were set so low that my enjoyment level is off the charts after the five days of ownership thus far... 150 miles and counting! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I compared here and there, but I felt at home with the CBR. No regrets on my part, and my my expectations were set so low that my enjoyment level is off the charts after the five days of ownership thus far... 150 miles and counting! :D
Awesome :D .

I've ridden and owned quite a few sub 400cc motorcycles in the past and the CBR300R looks a fun bike to ride :) .

I sat on one at a dealer's today and had a good look over one and liked what I saw.

I've not seen it in red apart from photos, but prefer the white to black colour, though it still looks good in black :) .

My Honda CRF250LD which I've owned almost 2 years is a fun bike to ride, so the CBR300R can only be better?

The most difficult decision might be deciding which motorcycle I sell to make way for a CBR300R.. Will it have to be my CRF250LD or my CBR900RR-P......?
 

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Awesome :D .

I've ridden and owned quite a few sub 400cc motorcycles in the past and the CBR300R looks a fun bike to ride :) .

I sat on one at a dealer's today and had a good look over one and liked what I saw.

I've not seen it in red apart from photos, but prefer the white to black colour, though it still looks good in black :) .

My Honda CRF250LD which I've owned almost 2 years is a fun bike to ride, so the CBR300R can only be better?

The most difficult decision might be deciding which motorcycle I sell to make way for a CBR300R.. Will it have to be my CRF250LD or my CBR900RR-P......?
Definitely agree that this is a very nimble & fun bike. I haven't really stretched its legs since I'm still a new rider and also within the break-in period, but I can tell that it doesn't have massive power. I actually prefer its personality... I'm a very happy camper right now.

Definitely a good idea to see all the colors in person... Good luck trying to choose because the CBR looks good in each of the exteriors, haha.
 

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Definitely agree that this is a very nimble & fun bike. I haven't really stretched its legs since I'm still a new rider and also within the break-in period, but I can tell that it doesn't have massive power. I actually prefer its personality... I'm a very happy camper right now.

Definitely a good idea to see all the colors in person... Good luck trying to choose because the CBR looks good in each of the exteriors, haha.
I'm not bothered too much about the power. I rode the Ninja 300 last year and must admit I was looking for more power, but I've changed my mind on that now. Agility and lightness is important to me as for winter riding this is important to me and where the lower capacity bikes have the edge over the larger bikes. I have access to other bikes if I'm after massive power :) .
 

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I'm not bothered too much about the power. I rode the Ninja 300 last year and must admit I was looking for more power, but I've changed my mind on that now. Agility and lightness is important to me as for winter riding this is important to me and where the lower capacity bikes have the edge over the larger bikes. I have access to other bikes if I'm after massive power :) .
Looks like you know what you're looking for... Which is good because you'll appreciate the CBR in that respect.
 
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Looks like you know what you're looking for... Which is good because you'll appreciate the CBR in that respect.
I've read lots of reviews and watched watched several videos and like what I see.

Single cylinder bikes can be harder on consumables such as chains, but that's fine to me. I would seriously be considering doing more frequent oil changes based on what I've read so far and using good quality oil. I don't do many miles on my CRF250LD, but change the oil annually. I wasn't expecting my CRF250LD to be as well made as the Hondas that are made in Japan, but I'm impressed enough with it (made in Thailand).
 

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I've read lots of reviews and watched watched several videos and like what I see.

Single cylinder bikes can be harder on consumables such as chains, but that's fine to me. I would seriously be considering doing more frequent oil changes based on what I've read so far and using good quality oil. I don't do many miles on my CRF250LD, but change the oil annually. I wasn't expecting my CRF250LD to be as well made as the Hondas that are made in Japan, but I'm impressed enough with it (made in Thailand).
Would have loved if our CBR would have been made in Japan, but Thailand works for me as well.

I didn't know single cylinder bikes are harder on consumables... That's interesting.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Would have loved if our CBR would have been made in Japan, but Thailand works for me as well.

I didn't know single cylinder bikes are harder on consumables... That's interesting.
I was a bit concerned about the bike being made in Thailand at first
but so far so good. Honda are reknowned for their quality and there are often comments about the finish of modern Hondas not being as good as older Hondas. My CB1000R is made in Italy, but the quality is still good :) .

The consumables are going to be cheaper as the bike is built to a price. The power delivery on a single is harsher on chains for example. I read a review the reckoned that long term ownership compared to a CB500R would not be any cheaper due to other items too such as camchain tensioners that might need replacing at earlier intervals than on a twin for example. DON'T let that put you off. I recently paid £35 for a set of Yamaha brake pads and Honda pads for similar bike were half the price. However the Yamaha ones I was replacing lasted 25,000 miles. Four cylinder machines are reknown for their smooth power delivery and a good quality cared for chain can last over 30,000 miles. I would not expect the 300's chain to last 30,000 miles.
 

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Went to have a closer look at a CBR300R at a local Honda dealer on Saturday with a pal of mine after I dropped off my NC35 / RVF400RR engine with him. He thought it was an okay bike.

Phoned the dealer yesterday and paid a deposit. Will hopefully take delivery in about 10 days time :) .
 

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What colour did you go for? Is the CBR300 a popular bike in the UK, doesn't seem to be many UK owners on the forum?
Dont be too bothered about chain stretch and wear, its only got 30HP and 520 size chains are relatively cheap.
 

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What colour did you go for? Is the CBR300 a popular bike in the UK, doesn't seem to be many UK owners on the forum?
Dont be too bothered about chain stretch and wear, its only got 30HP and 520 size chains are relatively cheap.

I went for the tri-colour red, white and blue as it's my favourite. It's the same / similar to the CBR1000RR, CBR600RR and CBR500R. Second choice would have been the red.


The CBR300R is launched in the UK in August and is not popular at all. It's not selling. The reason it's not selling is almost certainly due to changes in licensing laws. Newish riders can now ride a bike up to 48bhp, so why would most people want to buy a 30bhp bike when they can buy a 48bhp bike? A 1 year old CBR500R can be bought for only a few hundred £ more than the list price of a CBR300R.


I'm not too bothered about chain wear and It's useful to know 520 chains are relatively cheap. Due to the power delivery of a single it's part and parcel of these type of engines. I've owned 6 singles (XL185S, DR125S, XT350, MTX80, H100A, CRF250LD). If you buy a good quality chain and look after your chain it should last well. The original OE DID chain on my XJR1300SP lasted over 30,000 miles :) .
 

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Always loved how the tri color looked on the 600, honda really did well with that one, IMO it was one of the better looking bikes within that range.
 

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Always loved how the tri color looked on the 600, honda really did well with that one, IMO it was one of the better looking bikes within that range.
The dealer I got my bike from had a 600 tri-color on their floor, it looks awesome. When I get comfortable with riding it may be my next bike.
 

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I'm not too bothered about chain wear and It's useful to know 520 chains are relatively cheap. Due to the power delivery of a single it's part and parcel of these type of engines. I've owned 6 singles (XL185S, DR125S, XT350, MTX80, H100A, CRF250LD). If you buy a good quality chain and look after your chain it should last well. The original OE DID chain on my XJR1300SP lasted over 30,000 miles :) .
Ive got a friend who races Ducati's and only cleans his chains, never lubes them. Reckons the lube attracts road grit which acts like a grinding paste and wears your chain. Makes sense to me.
Hey I see you had an XT350. I bought one when I was living in the UK and rode it home across Asia. From Norwich to Cairns in Australia. I think it was something like 12,000 miles and the little XT never missed a beat. Would fit an oil cooler tho if I did it again, 1500mls is not enough sump capacity in the middle east.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ive got a friend who races Ducati's and only cleans his chains, never lubes them. Reckons the lube attracts road grit which acts like a grinding paste and wears your chain. Makes sense to me.
Hey I see you had an XT350. I bought one when I was living in the UK and rode it home across Asia. From Norwich to Cairns in Australia. I think it was something like 12,000 miles and the little XT never missed a beat. Would fit an oil cooler tho if I did it again, 1500mls is not enough sump capacity in the middle east.
Yes, the lube does attract dirt. However chain lube will prevent a chain from rusting and reduce the wear on the rollers and sprockets. Personally, I would say you should clean and lube your chain.

Sounds like an incredible journey you had on your XT.Out of all the Trail bikes I've owned, it's my favourite. I rode over 38,000 miles on mine.
 
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