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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I found a nail in my tyre tonight, pulled it out and pssssssss, flat, removed my wheel and noticed the sprocket carrier had half an inch of play forward and backwards :mad:, this might explain the snatching even when the chain was adjusted correctly, I hope its not caused premature chain wear. So cush drive rubbers are shagged, then I notice brake pads are at 3mm:eek:, ffs its only got 3500 miles on it not ragged and hardly sees 8k revs I mean i go to work on it, now have to wait till next week for a day off, rubbers better be under warranty as for pads Im not sure they should not be knackered at this mileage considering I only really use the rear in emergency's and bad weather, I hope this is not going to be regular or its time to get rid Aaaarrrrggggg.
 

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I only really use the rear in emergency's and bad weather.


Sorry to hear about your tire, bad luck for sure. As for the other issues I would imagine an issue with free "play" should have been addressed at your first service. See what they say


As far as the brakes are concerned. You should be using more of your rear brake than your front. Hopefully you took the motorcycle course and were taught that........ Regardless new pads are dirt cheap.
 

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.........As far as the brakes are concerned. You should be using more of your rear brake than your front. Hopefully you took the motorcycle course and were taught that........
Er, nope. There are situations where the rear brake is useful but in normal riding you should be using the front brake 90% of the time. The rear provides relatively little stopping power, especially when braking hard.
 

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Er, nope. There are situations where the rear brake is useful but in normal riding you should be using the front brake 90% of the time. The rear provides relatively little stopping power, especially when braking hard.

My point is in a parking lot you should ONLY use the rear. In all other situations it is a blend (70 front, 30 rear), not JUST the front. Yes most of the stopping power comes from front and subsequently the traction is best on the front tire. But to say you never use the rear brake is a terrible habit to develop. Essentially, you should always be using it (unless you are racing in which case rules change)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Er, nope. There are situations where the rear brake is useful but in normal riding you should be using the front brake 90% of the time. The rear provides relatively little stopping power, especially when braking hard.
Thats how I usually ride, rear in bad weather, emergency and scrub off speed in a corner if needed and low speed maneuvers , use a lot of engine brake and fronts mostly. Rear brake pads from Honda $48 US dollars a must to keep the warranty, nothing is cheap in rip off England.
 

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Thats how I usually ride, rear in bad weather, emergency and scrub off speed in a corner if needed and low speed maneuvers , use a lot of engine brake and fronts mostly. Rear brake pads from Honda $48 US dollars a must to keep the warranty, nothing is cheap in rip off England.
Unless the Honda New Motorcycle warranty terms are really wonky in the UK, it shouldn't affect your bikes warranty in the least by installing aftermarket brake pads. That said, good quality, name brand brake pads like EBC, SBS, Ferodo, etc. will typically cost more than the OEM replacements from Honda. Here in the US, the OEM rear pads are about $32 from one of the online Honda dealers, like Partzilla.com.

Obviously brake pads are considered a normal wear item, and would not be covered under Honda's warranty. I'm pretty sure the same will be true for the rubber drive cushions... not covered under warranty, as they are also considered a wear item. It's hard to believe though that they would be worn out with only 3500 miles on your bike. My 250R has just shy of 15,000 miles, with the original cushions still in excellent condition. And I ride it pretty hard most of the time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
@MotoMike, definitely fubar, Ive changed them on other bikes in the past, new ones are a tight fit with no movement at all, could always pack them with inner tube material lol. These have a good half inch of movement.
Im sure I have too use Honda parts for our warranty here supposedly fitted by a VAT registered garage, over here aftermarkets are usually cheaper than oem stuff.
 

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@MotoMike, definitely fubar, Ive changed them on other bikes in the past, new ones are a tight fit with no movement at all, could always pack them with inner tube material lol. These have a good half inch of movement.
Im sure I have too use Honda parts for our warranty here supposedly fitted by a VAT registered garage, over here aftermarkets are usually cheaper than oem stuff.
I know that in some countries you have to have routine maintenance performed by a Honda dealer to keep the warranty in effect (not so in the US, thanks to the Magnason-Moss Warranty Act).

As for those drive cushions, no one else makes them besides Honda, so no aftermarket options for those. But for other normal wear parts there's no reason why you shouldn't be able to use aftermarket parts sources. For example, it's not like you have to buy replacement tires from Honda in order to keep the warranty in effect. Should be the same for other normal wear items.

You might want to check the paperwork/booklets that came with your bike. When I bought my 250R, besides the Owner's Manual and a riders safety booklet, I received a booklet titled Honda New Motorcycle Warranty which covers all the terms & details of the factory warranty for bikes sold in the US. I would think that Honda UK (as well as other countries) would have a similar warranty booklet.
 

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Mark, what kind of cleaning solvent have you been using to clean you chain with?

It's entirely possible that using a really caustic solvent, some of the solvent may have gotten into the hub and attacked the rubber drive cushions.
 
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That's a weird one the worn cush drives. I can only think of the chain being too tight but I'm unconvinced about that too.
Yeah maybe a solvent attack...
So few miles too. :confused:
 

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Needs to be checked out. Sorry to hear, and hope you find the resolution to get your mind back to riding freely again.
 

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Changed my tyres at 9000 miles and the cush drive rubbers were a little chewed up,but just needed the loose edges pulling off.
Put your bike on a paddock stand and spin the wheel by hand to check the brake is not binding.
The salt on the roads in England can soon seize the calipers and brake piston.
If the wheel spins freely then maybe you are resting your foot on the brake pedal while riding.
Do you ride with the ball of your foot on the peg or the instep as if riding a horse.
If you do a lot of slow riding in the city are you slipping the clutch or just snapping the throttle on and off,this may account for the cush drive wear.
I have done 19000 miles,mostly back country roads,hard accelerating and hard braking from corner to corner and my brake pads are still not worn out.
 

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My point is in a parking lot you should ONLY use the rear. In all other situations it is a blend (70 front, 30 rear), not JUST the front. Yes most of the stopping power comes from front and subsequently the traction is best on the front tire. But to say you never use the rear brake is a terrible habit to develop. Essentially, you should always be using it (unless you are racing in which case rules change)
You didn't say, "in a parking lot" and I didn't say, "I never use the rear brake".

I don't agree that we should "always" use the rear brake, but maybe that isn't what you meant to say?

Also, I would hazard a guess that the top guys in MotoGP use the rear brake more than any of us, just not for slowing down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hi
I don't ride the brake and ride with the balls of my feet on pegs, bike is on paddock stand each night to lube chain so no binding, I have a hose round the front of my house and if there's a hint off salt on the road its rinsed when I get home before its put away, my roads are some a, b and country lanes 15 miles each way a day, caliper pistons are clean, I will put the pads down to soft material although by hence on the have plenty left on them and I found another dealer on eBay selling rears for £16, the drive rubbers I will see Honda about as I'm not happy about them.
I hope it not a sign of things to come.
 

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on using rear and front brakes,
personally i prefer the front generally
with better feel thru two fingers
than thru my foot [with riding boots]..

other than set up for strong braking
i virtually dont use the rear brake..
not saying this is best for everyone,
but that it is an option, once general
braking skills and road craft are good..

once strong braking has begun, mass moving
forward continues forward and upward..
in heavy braking or emergency braking
rear wheel will likely lift off the road
thus being totally ineffective..
[ps - check out motogp super slow motion
of rear wheels lifting, at speed, under braking]

in traffic i typically ride with two or one
finger resting [ready] over its brake lever..
sometimes alternating all four out there..
one finger will, do the job in lower speed
traffic type fast braking situations..

by using your fingers [resting on their lever]
you are training your brain and all the small
muscles used to squeeze the lever in..
ongoing, free, directed braking practice..
which will and must have beneficial effects
when strong braking with squeezing action
happens in response to circumstances..

riding without such ongoing front brake practice
relying on the rear brake only is imo not only
a waste of excellent ongoing training
but also dangerous, as in emergency etc
braking every microsecond counts..

every movement, from extending fingers out
from around the bar, to finding and starting
to flex to the full squeeze of the lever
all take microseconds, in which impacts
or their avoidance, are measured..

motorcycle rear brakes have always been weaker,
by design, than front brakes..
my cb72 [250 twin] had 8" twin leading shoe
front brakes, but smaller leading-trailing rear..
trailing being weaker, but good for stopping
when rolling backwards..

cbr300r has a 296mm front disc, 220mm rear,
twin brake pads front, single rear..

but dont believe me,, do your own serious
testing and ongoing braking practice..
away from traffic and potential dangers..

see what you can do with two or one finger..
find out for yourself, then add whatever
skills you find/develop to normal riding..
 

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... other than set up for strong braking
i virtually dont use the rear brake...
I also rarely use the rear brake on my CBR. Still on the original front pads too.

Riding my off road bike is a different story, where I do use the rear brake quite often.
 
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references to rear brake for typical road use..
my son [delivers pizzas] parking methods
include hitting rear brake on approach,
sliding rear [scooter, not his own cb400r]
around and into parking position..

i also use rear brake for parking,
but not speedway style,, mainly for
holding during fore and aft movements
in close to her security gum tree..

for which rear brake is quite handy..
when not under power single track vehicles
fall over unless held, thus front brake fingers
are busy holding their grips in maneuvering,
when foot and rear brake come on duty..

with good tyres, normal road surfaces,
normal setup etc, front brake is reliable
and unlikely to just skid out under you,
especially with abs, but also with
basic good braking habits..

anyone habitually using rear brake only
or mainly, on the roads should try practicing
and investigating what their [excellent]
front brake, and they, can do together..

even a single 15min practice
somewhere quiet is well worth
the minimal effort..
then, when feeling being in control,
not a problem to start regular
skills practicing...
 

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My old farm hack when i was a kid was great for entering grassy corners by holding in the clutch, locking up the rear wheel, dropping from 4th to 2nd gear and holding the throttle wide open for when the bike was facing the right way.

One day i tried this and my brake foot, along with the brake lever, hit the ground. My only option was to ditch it into the cane paddock as i was coming up to a cutting than was a few dozers deep. I limp home and straighten the bars up, then dad tells me he broke the rear brake rod on a rock chasing cows.

It was never fixed, i just had to change my riding style.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Got my Honda rear pads, not much more meat on them than mine really, expected more from OEM stuff, will take piccy and measure on Sunday for anyone interested.

Mark
 
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