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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I would love to find a digital copy of the Owner's Manual that comes with our CBR300R. Obviously I have one, but I like to keep it in my 'trunk' and I can't be bothered to pick up that little physical book when all my reading for work is done digitally!
Does anyone know where to find a PDF of the owner's manual?
I did appreciate the pictures of the service intervals.
 

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I haven't seen any PDF's of the US version of the CBR300R Owner's Manual. I have seen AU versions of the CBR250R O/M in PDF online.

I have to ask though... if you "can't be bothered to pick up that little physical book", what's the point in even having it? From my experience, the act of reading something is pretty much the same whether it happens to be in paper form, or on a computer screen.

Something else I've noticed is that Owner's Manuals which are kept in the bikes storage compartment tend to get destroyed in short order... one ride in a good hard rain is usually all it takes to ruin an O/M. I keep my motorcycle O/M's in a file folder at my desk, as that is generally where I'm at when I want to reference something... same for all my bikes Service Manuals. I've yet to find a need to stop and look at the Owner's Manual when I'm out riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The point of having the digital copy is that I can upload it to my reference manager. This allows me to take digital notes on the owner's manual, link it to videos showing the specific maintenance, or websites and forums with more information all in one convenient place that syncs to all my devices.
That way, when I am grading student papers and I wonder "What is the recommended oil change interval?" I can open up the program, search oil change, have it in two seconds and get back to my work. Otherwise I need to pull it out of the trunk, out of a bookshelf, out of a drawer. Find the right page and generally be much less efficient. Additionally, I run the risk of the book being destroyed or lost as you mentioned.
It also allows me to carry it and all the notes anywhere I go in my smartphone, laptop, ect. There are tons of useful tools that I can use digitally, that I can not use on a physical little book.

I do have the 250 user manual, but there are quite a few differences.
 

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... That way, when I am grading student papers and I wonder "What is the recommended oil change interval?" I can open up the program, search oil change, have it in two seconds and get back to my work. Otherwise I need to pull it out of the trunk, out of a bookshelf, out of a drawer. Find the right page and generally be much less efficient. Additionally, I run the risk of the book being destroyed or lost as you mentioned.
It also allows me to carry it and all the notes anywhere I go in my smartphone, laptop, ect. There are tons of useful tools that I can use digitally, that I can not use on a physical little book.

I do have the 250 user manual, but there are quite a few differences.
Sorry, but I have to play devil's advocate here... why would you want to interrupt the job of grading student papers, just to look up something random (oil change interval for your bike) that is in no way related to the task at hand (grading papers)? Seems like doing that actually falls into the category of not using your time efficiently. Anymore than If you were right in the middle of changing the oil & oil filter on your bike, would you suddenly want to put the wrenches down and go off and answer e-mails, or grade a few student papers before going back and finishing the oil change? I wouldn't.

As far as the "risk" of loosing or destroying the paper O/M, it would seem as though that would be a moot point if you have no intention of ever using the paper version of the O/M. Logically, the point of having the paper version of the O/M, and the reason that Honda supplies one with each and every new motorcycle, is to actually read it. But to the point I made in my previous post, the O/M stands a much better chance of being destroyed if kept in the storage compartment of your bike, than it does in a desk drawer or on a book shelf.

In reality, once you've taken the time to read through the Owner's Manual and familiarize yourself with the maintenance section, you'll pretty much know what most of the intervals are from memory... in fact I can tell you from memory that the recommended oil change interval per the Honda O/M, is every 8000 miles (however IMO that is far too many miles for an engine which has less than 2 quarts of oil in the sump. I prefer to change my oil & oil filter on a 4000 mile interval... it's cheap insurance for a long engine service life).
 
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I like the idea of referring to a paper manual... Feels more closer to the original product on hand. I can understand the convenience of an electronic / PDF format at the same time. It just comes down to preference, I suppose.
 
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I prefer PDF. Most of the stuff I buy comes with a manual but one of the first things I do is look for the PDF. Ya I know it's weird.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Seems like doing that actually falls into the category of not using your time efficiently.
There are two primary reasons why I might interrupt my work to do something ‘random’ as you say. The first, and most common, is that it is time for a short break. The second is that some things are important enough to interrupt another task, even work, so they can be completed.

In regards to taking breaks to do something ‘random’. Numerous studies in cognitive psychology show that people are most productive at tasks when they take short breaks every 20-40 minutes. This is especially true for tasks such as studying, writing, and reading, but it also applies to tasks such as manual labor. An oil change would be a good example. The shorter the time working the shorter the break should be (e.g., 2-3 minute break after 20 minutes of work, or 5-7 minute break after 40 minutes of work). Interestingly the breaks are more effective when they are spent doing something very different from the task at hand. So going from grading papers to reading a motorcycle owner’s manual for 2-3 minutes will actually leave me sharper, and will lead to better memory of what I covered just before and just after the break than if I had not taken a break at all.

Could I get this benefit from reading the physical manual on a break? Yes, I could. However, even though I have some nice dog-eared pages in the owner’s manual, I may only have time in that short break to look up the recommended interval. Whereas, if I have such quick access on the computer, where I am already sitting and grading, I will also be able to find and even order the proper oil filter in that time from a nice hyperlink I attached to my digital owner’s manual.

This is also related to your hypothetical situation of leaving in the midst of an oil change. To answer your question, Yes, I actually have left in the middle of working on my car to answer emails and grade papers. There was a bolt on my brake caliper I could not get loose one day when changing the rotors. I had been trying to get this single bolt off for about half an hour. I took a break and did some work, answered a few emails, and suddenly remembered my neighbor had a pneumatic drill! I was able to call him and get it off in a few minutes. The small break doing something as random as emails allowed me to think more clearly than I was beforehand and actually accomplish the task more efficiently. Would I stop in the middle of a normal oil change? Probably not. But my point is these ‘random’ side tasks during breaks lead to increased productivity on the original task.

In regards to a task being important enough to interrupt work I would like you to consider an example. Perhaps I have been so busy with a new job that I have neglected the oil change for longer than is recommended, which we can agree is not good. A student’s paper mentions their motorcycle and I suddenly remember I have not changed the oil in a while… it seems like too long. So I check the mileage of my bike on my nice fuelly app and I check my digital owner’s manual to find the recommended oil change interval as well as the note on the odometer reading at the last oil change. Luckily, that handy hyperlink will allow me to buy the necessary materials quickly and I can get back to work. Could that task wait? Sure, but if I have forgotten all this time, it’s probably not wise to put it off any more.

One of the main reasons why a digital copy will be more useful to me than a physical copy is that I use these computer tools all day, every day. My work moves efficiently because I use this reference manager tool for nearly all my books articles, and even car owner’s manuals! I am much quicker when using these tools than I am when I use a physical book because I have so much experience using them. In fact, I use the digital version of my textbooks nine times out of ten for these reasons even though all these books are within arm’s reach without me leaving my chair.

You are a former factory test rider. I assume from that you are pretty familiar with bikes and their maintenance. This experience has helped you develop the capacity to remember these facts like the oil change interval and likely the type of oil it needs and the amount too. I don’t have this same experience. I have not developed the connections and cognitive structures necessary for me to memorize the maintenance section of the owner’s manual with a couple readings. So yes, I can, and have, familiarized myself with the maintenance section of the owner’s manual. Even so, I can’t recall these items from memory. I do have the skill to use my work tools to ‘remember’ these things for me because I have familiarized myself with them, just as you are familiar with bikes, their maintenance, and operation.

You have a way of doing things but it’s not the only way to do something, nor is it the best way for all people, or even most people. I have another way of doing things. You likely do things your way because they work for you. I do things my way because they work for me. So despite your assumption that doing something ‘random’ is not an efficient use of my time, I contend that doing a ‘random’ task during a break from work can actually benefit my work and make it more efficient. Additionally, it may be that the ‘random’ task is important enough to distract from my work.

Here is a nice article that talks about the break issue if you are interested. Taking Breaks Found to Improve Attention | Psych Central News
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I prefer PDF. Most of the stuff I buy comes with a manual but one of the first things I do is look for the PDF. Ya I know it's weird.
I do the same. I have a folder in my file cabinet full of physical manuals. But it's so much easier to use the PDF.
 

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The small break doing something as random as emails allowed me to think more clearly than I was beforehand and actually accomplish the task more efficiently. Would I stop in the middle of a normal oil change? Probably not. But my point is these ‘random’ side tasks during breaks lead to increased productivity on the original task.
I work in an Engineering maintenance workshop. Often when we come up against a difficult situation where the usual techniques haven't worked and people are getting frustrated we will call a tea break. Afterwards with a renewed energy and cooler head its often easier to see a way forward or a solution to the problem.

I'm a paper manual man, possibly because of my age :)laugh:) but mainly because my hands are normally too dirty to use touch screens or a keyboard :D

Like you said tho, there's no right or wrong format, its all the same info at the end of the day.
 
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Never too old to learn

I always need to step back on threads like this; just to marvel. I learn so much about people! :nerd:


I would love a PDF copy of the owners manual to have the ability to have it anywhere I am. As it is, I enter my motorcycles as contacts in my phone. It includes chain and tire sizes, spark plug number and other basics. Maybe because all my other bikes were "projects" that had a higher chance of failure requiring such knowledge, but I feel it was just the comfort of knowing I had it with me. When I had 5 motorcycles at one time, it was very handy when parts shopping to have the data close at hand. If I was on-line ordering at work, on the road or anywhere I had internet access - I could shop. If I was at a store and something was on sale, I could check and see if that clearance item really would fit something I had.


By all means safely memorize and file away the pristine paper copy of the OM! I'm going to count on the written word over my memory, and the more accessible it is, the more likely I am to use it for avoiding a mistake.


I like all the data and parts in an electronic format, but am old skool enough to prefer a paper repair manual. Even to printing off the pages needed for a repair from an electronic format.


The Honda tail bag I installed on my CB300F came with a QR code, and web address for installation instructions - what a fine use of electronic media to avoid 28 pages of multiple language printings for 4 installation steps and 43 legal/warranty/disclaimer comments :)


It's also handy to be able to get the manual as a PDF from the interwebz when the bike is sold without the pristine manual under the seat as it is forgotten in a previous owners' drawer and not provided with the sale. (BTDT) ;)


Peter
 

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... It's also handy to be able to get the manual as a PDF from the interwebz when the bike is sold without the pristine manual under the seat as it is forgotten in a previous owners' drawer and not provided with the sale...
True, that does probably happen on occasion... although I have bought used off road bikes (most of which do not have under seat storage compartments), and the seller would bring out a nice, fairly clean O/M for the bike which was kept in a file folder along with the title and other paperwork.

I've also looked at other used bikes in the past where the original O/M was under the seat, however it was rendered completely useless as a result of having gotten wet either during rides in the rain, or while the bike was being washed.

Fortunately, when it comes to Honda motorcycle Owner's Manuals, you can order them through Helm, Inc. (they're the same publisher for the factory Honda Service Manuals) if the original copy happens to go missing.
 

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I agree it should be online. My 2013 Accord manual is free from Honda online in PDF form.

Owner's Manual | 2013 Honda Accord Sedan | Honda Owners Site

Why can't they put the motorcycle manuals up? It's silly to have to pay for an electronic copy. I use the Find feature all the time as well, something that you can't do with paper without digging in the index and hoping you find the right keyword.

If I wanted to check how much coolant/oil my bike holds, I'd have to walk downstairs and out to my bike, open the seat cover, then search though the manual. If they provided it in PDF I'd have the information in less than 10 seconds.
 

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... You are a former factory test rider. I assume from that you are pretty familiar with bikes and their maintenance. This experience has helped you develop the capacity to remember these facts like the oil change interval and likely the type of oil it needs and the amount too. I don’t have this same experience. I have not developed the connections and cognitive structures necessary for me to memorize the maintenance section of the owner’s manual with a couple readings. So yes, I can, and have, familiarized myself with the maintenance section of the owner’s manual. Even so, I can’t recall these items from memory. I do have the skill to use my work tools to ‘remember’ these things for me because I have familiarized myself with them, just as you are familiar with bikes, their maintenance, and operation...
Don't take this the wrong way, but I'm finding it hard to believe that if you've read through the maintenance section of the Owner's Manual a few times, that you would still be unable to retain at least some of the more pertinent information.

So if, after having read through the O/M maintenance section several times, someone were to ask you what the recommended tire pressures are for your CBR300R, you're saying you'd have to go back and look that up? And if I asked the same "what are the recommended tire pressures for the 300R?" question (of which the answer is 29 psi front & rear for a solo rider; 33 psi for the rear if carrying a passenger) two weeks from now, would you have to look it up once again?... or if you were to get into the good habit of actually checking the tire pressure on your bike once a week, would you then have to look up what that recommended pressure is each and every time you check it, or would that number eventually find a place in your memory banks?
 

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$104 plus tax and shipping is ridiculous and as someone has pointed out, $40 is the usual cost. I bought the Honda Factory Service manual from Helm for the Grom for $40, so Helm seems to have just jumped the price. The R3 service manual from the dealer which is the only place you can buy one for now was $87, but that's the dealer and everything dealers sell is overpriced. When the R3 service manual makes it to the online publishers it will be lower probably. Next new bike I buy, I plan to search online for the service manual and if one is available, make that part of the negotiation, since it doesn't cost the dealer anything close to what they charge. They might even throw it in at the last minute to make a deal. Before I've added on oil filters and even the first service depending on the dealer. Same with helmets etc. First thing they do after you buy a bike otherwise is try to sell you gear, so if you need stuff, might as well include it in the negotiations to buy the bike....at the end, not the beginning. "OK, I'll pay you the $3600 if you include 2 oil filters and the service manual."
 

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My service manual arrived today. It is very well written and I can clearly see how to remove the top cowling..ska nose cone and also remove the plastic gas tank cover to check for my rattle. There is also a secondary air breather system and it dawns on me something could also be hiding in that. Anyway the manual describes in detail how to check valves. The issue there is you would want to have the proper shims on hand because it would be double work to reassemble the bike while you ordered a shim kit. Ill prob check my own valves since I've done it before many times. $46 is a good investment for me. For those who haven't gone through a valve check at the dealer, you have to leave you bike, then the next day or two the call you to say you valves are fine.That will be $600. Lol
 

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[... edited...] sells the REPAIR MANUAL for $40 plus $6 shipping rather than $104.
Sounds like a good move to start making copies of my manual and sending them out to people in need. That is absolutely ridiculous.
Maybe Helm Inc. is charging so much more for the 300R/F service manual in an effort to cover their and Honda's cost of writing it in the first place, only to have the internet bootleggers pay for one copy at $104 and then turn around and make 100's of xerox copies to sell at $40 per copy. Nice little business... too bad it's also illegal under U.S. Copyright Law. And believe it or not, if/when the FBI catches these guys, they do get prosecuted under those federal copyright laws. I'm sure there are at least a few people hanging out in the federal prison system (at taxpayer expense, of course) who thought copying service manuals, or other copyrighted materials that someone else legally owns the rights to, would be a quick and easy way to make money, without having to really work for it like the rest of us.

If you haven't guessed by now I take a dim view of internet bootleggers & pirates, not just as a moderator here, but for personal reasons as well. And I'll tell you why: I work as an actor in film & television industry. If a movie that I worked on is copied and then sold in large quantities on the black market by some sleazy POS bootlegger, I won't see a nickel as far the residual payments that I would normally get per the agreement between the Screen Actors Guild and the legal owner of said movie. In a nutshell, these bootlegger are blatantly stealing, not only from me, but from every other actor and individual who has a residual agreement with the distributor/legal owner of that particular work. It's illegal, and it is wrong.

As some of you already know (at least those who have read the rules for this CBR300forum website) postings of links to bootleg copies of service manuals will be deleted.


~ Mike
 

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[... link deleted...] This is where I bought mine. It looks legit and the manual looks like the Grom manual I bought from Helm, except there is no binding that wraps around from front to back. Just a front cover and plain black back cover. Come to think of it, the plastic front cover has white holes showing through but no holes that go all the way through the book like the Grom Manual does so it can be placed inside a binder. Nothing looks copied or reproduced though.
 

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[... link deleted...] This is where I bought mine. It looks legit and the manual looks like the Grom manual I bought from Helm, except there is no binding that wraps around from front to back. Just a front cover and plain black back cover. Come to think of it, the plastic front cover has white holes showing through but no holes that go all the way through the book like the Grom Manual does so it can be placed inside a binder. Nothing looks copied or reproduced though.
That's because the Grom manual is an official Honda publication from Helm Inc.... those differences in the 300R/F manual that you point out, as compared to your Grom manual, are the tell-tale signs of a bootleg copy. The pages aren't bound together with glue like the Helm's manuals, are they? And as you said, it doesn't have the holes along the spine to put it into a 7 ring binder like the Helm's manuals have. I'll bet you can also tell a difference in the quality and weight of the paper that was used, as compared to the Grom manual from Helm.

All signs of a pirated manual.
 
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