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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any comments on this taken from the owners manual?

"Recommended Shift Points
Shifting Up
From 1st to 2nd
From 2nd to 3rd
From 3rd to 4th
From 4th to 5th
From 5th to 6th
12 mph (20 km/h)
19 mph (30 km/h)
25 mph (40 km/h)
31 mph (50 km/h)
37 mph (60 km/h)
Shifting Down
From 6th to 5th
From 5th to 4th
From 4th to 3rd
28 mph (45 km/h)
22 mph (35 km/h)
16 mph (25 km/h)
Improper shifting can damage the engine, transmission,
and drive train. Also, coasting or towing the motorcycle
for long distances with the engine off can damage the
transmission.
27"
 

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there have been several previous discussions of this on these forums, so encourage you to use the search function, but for the most part, the consensus is to ignore the recommended shift points, as they are a guide only, and need to be adapted to the specific situation. with a little practice you can figure it out just by feel and sound. have fun.
 

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You don't have the range of speeds in each gear you would have in say a race bike like the GSXR600 in large part due to the higher reving race bike engine. 1st gear safely takes you past 60 mph for example without redlining but you could just as easily be in 6th gear by that time. 6th is good from about 40 mph on up to top speed. In town, when I slow down to take corners at say 40 mph, I am often in a higher gear on my Gixxer 600 (say 4th gear) than I would be on the CB300F which would be in either 2nd or 3rd. 4th gear would be lugging at that same speed but part of that is how much you accelerate coming out of the turn too, and you don't want to downshift in the corner if you can help it so you want to set up in a lower gear so the acceleration will be there when you need it. The shifting is a little more demanding on smaller, lower reving bikes. The range of shift points on the liter race bikes is even wider. They do one acceleration test where they go from 25 mph in 6th gear to top speed and many of those bikes do not lug even at 25 mph in 6th. I've found almost all those shift points to be lower by 5-10 mph than I generally shift up and that's on all my bikes. It might help with mileage to use the highest gear possible, but I prefer to have good acceleration at my command at any time, so I ride generally one gear lower than the manual recommendations.
 

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the owners manual gives a general idea
for the intellect of new owners..
obviously changing is different for different
situations/conditions, eg; uphill vs downhill..

ditto riding within traffic and so on..

this is just an idea for the minds of novices
for their initial practice sessions getting to
know their motorcycle and its gearbox..

if, they didnt say anything, some novices
could assume they should take it to
wherever the tacho red zone starts...

you must become familiar with your motorcycle
and what it can and cant do, and what it 'likes'..
eg, starting off downhill in first is just to get going,
whereas starting off uphill takes longer in first [etc]..

one method when learning your engine/gears
ie, practicing, is to use its torque range
where about 12 oclock on the tacho dial
is about right for changing gears..

how much throttle you use, will determine
how soon you get to that rev/speed zone..
 

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On the track, nothing beats the thrill of thrashing a powerful but 'peaky' race-tuned engine. I have very fond memories of track testing a 125 International spec kart for a magazine I used to work for, which had a powerband of just 1500rpm or so (can't recall exactly), somewhere between 11,000 and 13,000 rpm. Keeping that thing on the boil meant basically steering one-handed, because the other hand was never off the gear lever. Lovely!

On the road though, I prefer lots of torque. On roads that you don't know, or when riding in unpredictable conditions (traffic or road surface), having lots of torque means you rarely get caught out in the wrong gear and reasonable shove for an unplanned overtake is available any time you need it. It's also better for riding casually, when you can snick-snick-snick all the way up into top gear within a hundred metres or so, and leave it there. Lovely!
 

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Honestly.. I don't know why Honda placed the Red Line on the tach @ 10500 RPM when for what little experience I have had riding this bike ( and from what I have read)the power falls off at about 9000 RPM's (according to the stock tach).
 

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Honestly.. I don't know why Honda placed the Red Line on the tach @ 10500 RPM when for what little experience I have had riding this bike ( and from what I have read)the power falls off at about 9000 RPM's (according to the stock tach).
....but then it wouldn't do an indicated 109mph :(

Correct me if I'm wrong but doesn't the power tail off on most motorcycles before the red line?
 

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The red line is usually above the max power range and this is often a good thing is you're pushing it. You see, for max acceleration you might want to build revs before changing up so that, when the rpm's drop, you're still in the meaty part of the rev range. An engine that developed max power just before max rpm would be pretty awful to ride.
 
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