Honda CBR 300 Forum banner
1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
I was clenching my hands, feet, and teeth as the video progressed. I know it's pathetic to think about this, but I only wonder if there was an exit strategy (besides slowing down, of course). He yelled out noticing the car maybe a second before. It seems as though the car slowed or was trying to stop when noticing the bike. I wonder if the outcome would have been slightly different if the rider aimed left toward the forest and greenery as a last second decision.

Alas, the heartbreaking loss and lesson learned are more important than anything else.

Rest in peace.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,502 Posts
Yes I discovered this footage on the internet about six months ago and it has stuck in my mind since. Such a waste of life.
If there is one contributing factor that stands out for me (other than the obvious car drivers fault) it is speed.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
I saw this earlier in the year, trouble is when you are young you think you are infalable. I did when I was a teenager and had a couple of crashes but luckily only ended up in the hedge. A couple of mates of mine died young crashing their bikes and made me think after that.
I always drive defensively and respect speed limits. A very sad waste of life and feel for his parents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
If the need for that kind of speed happens often and regularly, I'd release that urge at the local track to be in a more controlled environment

In the vid, I don't blame the car. Yeah, there might have been a blind spot and that particular turn may have placed specific vehicles at a disadvantage, but the bike and its rider were going too fast to see or help anything coming.

That's the thing about riding / driving and sharing the road. These types of pop ups or errors are bound to happen. As a rider, there is every reason to anticipate a collision, and that it will be game over without keeping a constant defensive mindset.

Too much fun / pleasure combined with freedom can have its consequences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There is an offshoot of the above video I posted where it is stated (don't know how true) that the rider was between 90 + 95 MPH when he hit the car. Yes years ago I rode fast too....220KMS on my old Gixxer with more left. Today I hope to be wiser/smarter and ride with more caution at the speed limit...every time..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Good god, that's rough. Thanks for sharing this though, VERY important to keep all possibilities in mind at all times. Though I will never know that man, it is still like watching a friend die. We need to keep the reality of the dangers in the forefront of our minds daily. Let's work to keep us all on the road, not under ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Holy Smokes! B.K. that video is really something else......it really bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Goodness. That first video makes me sick. Completely unnecessary and all responsibility lies on the rider. Not that the 300 isn't capable of getting you into that sort of trouble either, but in my mind, the fact that that kind of power isn't available at an instant flick of the wrist keeps my desire for speed at bay.

That second video actually occurred close to where I live. It was huge news for a long time and brought up some pretty heated arguments with folks around here and not just in the motorcycle community. The rider certainly wasn't squeaky clean, (crossed a double yellow line to pass and was riding without a licence) but certainly he and his girl didn't deserve to be run down like that. ****, I got into a pretty tense discussion with a coworker who actually sided with the old man. Old guy did end up being arrested for aggravated assault but I haven't heard anything in a while. Crazy world we live in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
The thing is, if you sided with the old man, that people can take matters into their own hands THAT way, then the next course of action would have been something he wouldn't have likely survived. I can tell you that in the video I am most impressed with the calm frame of mind from the rider with the camera. I would not have been so level headed if I saw that happen to a friend of mine.

Careful riding folks, the world is a scary place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
Seen this one before (maybe on here?)

Both sides were at wrong, and the older guy in the car was more so, of course. Very messy situation, and I felt so bad for the lady passenger laying there in shock and pain.

Bitter to witness being riders, especially. Goes to show how bikes and cars don't go well competing with one another, especially when either side loses their cool or emotion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I see people doing things the wrong way all the time. Like BeerKanuck said, there's no justifications for that kind of retaliation against those who behave oppositely of your own wishes. That man is remorseless for his actions, which is a very sad thing.
Here's a news report video I found on the story:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yfWI4AATpjI
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
236 Posts
You really have to assume the worst out of drivers out there, as sad as that statement is. I find myself in situations sometimes where I am trying to predict the drivers' next move because they appear to be ready to pull out in front of me (or some other dick move).

I try not to let it ruin my confidence on the bike, but you really have to be careful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
[long response, basically first was speed and driver reality,
in the second he - and his pillion - were, taken, out...]

first video has been aired here or 250 forum etc before..
main factors being rider speed [approaching 100mph apparently]
together with vehicle turning across his path [predictable danger]..
driver turning that scenario would have seen a dot approaching
even if he/she had taken a good look [given info to brain]
but even then, brain has been trained just by normal driving
to associate a dot in the distance with a car, at normal speeds,,
ie, not a threat.. sufficient time to continue into the turn..

we must, assume they dont see us coming...
firstly because some dont actually see us there..
their brains relate well to perceived threats, trucks etc,
not to pushies, scoots or motorcycles..
[one reason to install serious 'truck' horns]

in the first video rider had fingers over bars, not extending
them until almost at impact.. this is a lesson as well..
not that braking from that speed was the solution,,
but it means that he had not taken a basic preparatory
position for that potential threat ahead, the T intersection
with cars coming the other way, ie, likely to turn..

he had not slowed down from very high speed,
which imo would be self evidently the only
basic rider response to that situation..

today the most common cause of smashes is not alcohol
or speeding [ie, of car drivers] but distracted driving..
drivers using mobile phones to make calls while driving,
checking their emails or social networks, playing computer games,
adjusting radios and so on, eating, drinking, smoking, talking
to passengers or attending to children or baby in back seat
[and so on]

just as that car simply turned in front of that motorcyclist,
we must assume that they are likely to make the turn
in front of us, in any similar situation..
thus ride accordingly,, within speeds giving us options,
to slow down and/or brake strongly, and/or take evasive
action.. this also includes riding with fingers extended
out over and on their brake [and clutch] levers..

as on the video, these impacts are measured in microseconds..
at normal road speeds, the actions of releasing grip, extending fingers
out over lever, closing fingers on lever, squeezing the lever,
are all measured in microseconds.. and can make the difference
between hit and miss or low impact and smashing
including of course potential injuries or none
or in the worst case scenario, death...

in the second video of the rider and pillion passing
the old bloke in the white car, there was no car ahead
of him [to overtake etc] and no other intersection etc..
aside from some brain explosion of reaction to a
microsleep or alcohol etc, he plainly and deliberately
- took the motorcycle out -

not a lot you can do if they decide to take you out,
but,, no need to make it easier for them either..
overtaking on open road such as the second video,
and with the possibility that the driver will be,
drunk, drugged, micro-sleeping or some nutcase,,
the overtake should be timed well, observing him
the while, ready to bale out or take off etc,
and making use of the full road space..

ie, not, riding close to it while overtaking,
rather using the furthest part of the road
available to the motorcycle,, where he must
drive off the road to get you..

finally, as an observation, if ever carrying a pillion,
you have another persons life and welbeing
in your hands, literally..
riding with a pillion [especially a girl!]
must be done with all care and
sober responsibility...

these [and there are many] crash videos
can be, potential learning devices, if,,
watched like a fighter pilot in training,
not just to scare yourself or whatever..

give yourself every, option and opportunity
to avoid or evade obvious dangers,
as part of every ride..

the enjoyment will still be there..
even more so, arriving home
safe and smiling...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
I often point out to young drivers and riders that exceeding the speed limit, especially on urban or peri-urban roads, invites accidents which on face value might be pinned on the other party when they shouldn't. This is because most people act in accordance with the speed that MOST vehicles are traveling, not individual vehicles. Consequently, in a restricted speed zone, we subconsciously do a calculation to determine if it's safe to walk across the road or turn across traffic based on that 'normal' speed rather than the actual speed of the next vehicle.

This leads to pedestrians and drivers alike thinking there is time/space to make a move, only to realise too late that there is one vehicle going much faster.

Bang.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CDNHONDAR

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
The interesting thing I find about the first accident, is that there is roughly 3 seconds between when the motorcyclist passed the final car and would have become visible and when the driver started the turn. I'm not sure distance wise how far away the motorcyclist would be EXPECTED to be visible, the problem with visibility is it is a very subjective thing, taking into account size of the object, movement, contrast between the object and its background, etc. So maybe the 3 seconds would be more like 2 seconds between visibility and action of the driver. Take into account reaction time from seeing the bike to taking evasive action, maybe 2 seconds is a reasonable time to correct an upcoming action, but it is borderline. I guess what I am wondering is, was the driver indeed watching the oncoming traffic with active attention, or were they either not looking or day dreaming, or had vision problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
The interesting thing I find about the first accident, is that there is roughly 3 seconds between when the motorcyclist passed the final car and would have become visible and when the driver started the turn. I'm not sure distance wise how far away the motorcyclist would be EXPECTED to be visible, the problem with visibility is it is a very subjective thing, taking into account size of the object, movement, contrast between the object and its background, etc. So maybe the 3 seconds would be more like 2 seconds between visibility and action of the driver. Take into account reaction time from seeing the bike to taking evasive action, maybe 2 seconds is a reasonable time to correct an upcoming action, but it is borderline. I guess what I am wondering is, was the driver indeed watching the oncoming traffic with active attention, or were they either not looking or day dreaming, or had vision problems.
See my earlier post. Chances are the driver didn't realise the bike was going way faster than the surrounding traffic and so thought he/she had time to get across the road and out of the way.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CDNHONDAR

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Im willing to bet, in the first video (I didn't watch the second. One is enough) that the rider knew that road pretty well. Well enough to know that an intersection is coming up and that he should probably reduce his speed. Something like death is not worth flirting with just because you don't want to reduce your speed for a few seconds.
As motorists, we all hope that other parties know how areas like this should be navigated. But, we cant expect it. We cant control it. We can only control our own actions. Which is why when I go out on my bike, I try to be the other motorists. I realize that they don't see me as well as I see them. That is why I take as many precautions as I can. Like my helmet is the brightest hi-viz I could get & most of my gear mismatches my bike color. I also have the reflective vinyl. Obeying speed limits helps too.

Now, I would be lying if I said I haven't done a few stupid things. All of them I said to myself "ah, I shouldn't have done that" and I learn from it.

We are all fortunate that we are still here. I know we don't take that for granted. Keep up the safe riding everyone. Lets finish the ride...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well said Jmreod58. May I say one more thing to add to you great post. When I took my safe riding course (years ago) I was told to ride during the day with your headlights on "Highbeam". With your headlights on "high" it helps you to be more visible.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top