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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm a big Honda fan (I currently own a 2013 Honda Shadow Phantom). I've been doing some research on the Honda CB300F. I'm happy to join this forum to learn more about the bike from your experiences.

Jeanette
 

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Coincidence, but I was debating between the Phantom and the 300 about a year ago. Never ridden a Phantom, must be nice.

I had the 300R, but I'm sure the F is very similar. Very athletic, nimble, and fun to ride. Good power too.

You'll likely get more members to chime in on their helpful thoughts here shortly...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Phantom is an awesome cruiser. I would totally recommend it. I've test ridden the CB300F today and my dealer is going to give me a decent deal.. but... I have some questions that I will look for guidance..

1. Seat lowering
2. Handle bar risers

After two shoulder surgeries in two years, reach and comfort is important. Thoughts?
 

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Welcome to the Forum Jeanette, lots of F owners on here and a few modders among them, should be able to help you out.
I cant as I'm 5' 11" and I lowered my bars rather than raising them. :)
I did spot these Rox Speed ones tho that according to the fitment guide fit the 300F.

Rox Speed FX Pivoting Handlebar Risers for 7/8" Clamps - Motorcycle Superstore

Here's a link to an old thread on the seat lowering:

http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/appearance-body/2586-anybody-tried-hondas-lowered-seat-option.html
 

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I've ridden both the 300F and the Shadow Spirit extensively.

The two are totally different. The 300F is way lighter both in lbs and in feel. The Shadow is a barge in comparison, you notice it in parking lots, at speed, all the time. The 300 is **** nimble.

The Shadow doesn't care what gear you're in.Pull away in 5th? Fine. Rev up in second? Whatever. Gear selection is important on the 300F


The Shadow seating position is way different too, you sit back with zero weight on your arms. The 300 places some weight on the shoulders and wrists. Not a lot, but in your case I'd be concerned. I'm 5' 8" so it may be different with 3 inches difference.

In short, I find the Shadow more comfortable to sit on and go straight, the 300 more comfortable in all other circumstances.
 

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Phantom is an awesome cruiser. I would totally recommend it. I've test ridden the CB300F today and my dealer is going to give me a decent deal.. but... I have some questions that I will look for guidance..

1. Seat lowering
2. Handle bar risers

After two shoulder surgeries in two years, reach and comfort is important. Thoughts?
I'm sure you'll discover some solutions in regards to modifying to suit your needs.

Also, I feel that as far as comfort and experience with how the 300F will pan out, you may just have to take the dive and let good seat time do the best talking - and then maybe you can adjust a thing or two to fit you better as the ownership continues.

I "assume" the 300 will be more lively, energetic, and upbeat compared to your Shadow - I think it'll get you more involved and connected with the ride. Whether this be a plus or minus, we may have to leave that up to you.
 

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It's obviously easy to obtain reviews of the bike, here and elsewhere. The more important issue should be, is it the bike for you? In other words, it's as much about you as the bike.

What are you looking for? Why are you considering changing? What kind of riding do you do and what sort of rider are you?

If I may assume you have limited biking experience and so offer a little advice, I would say the third aspect - what sort of riding do you do - is the most important. By this I mean, mostly commuting, long-distance touring, weekend fun rides to cafes in the mountains, high-speed sports riding, etc. Once we know this, the other questions come into play. Of course you might do a all of the aforementioned, but one style of biking will be more important than the others; ranking them is a good way to start.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Hi JNO,

I've been riding on and off for about 10 years. I've had various bikes; Honda Rebel, Suzuki S40 (terrible bike that backfired all the time) and then eventually trading up for the Phantom.

The interest in the CB300F is having a smaller bike for the weekend quick rides around the back roads of CT and NY. Possibly commuting to work (50 mile round trip, again, back roads). I plan to keep the Phantom for the longer distance rides which include highways, etc. But I'm looking for an upright bike that handles the corners with a little less effort than the Phantom. My dealer is making "an offer I can't refuse", which makes the CB300F a alittle more appealing to explore.

I might mention that I did test drive the Suzuki GW250 (again, a smaller, lighter bike), but would require alot of rewiring to put risers in to bring the handlebars up a bit.. I thought the Honda was a much better ride.
 

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.....I plan to keep the Phantom for the longer distance rides which include highways, etc. But I'm looking for an upright bike that handles the corners with a little less effort than the Phantom......
I think the 300F would be ideal. Probably the only negative, in my opinion, is that it has little torque low down, which makes relaxing rides in curvy country an exercise in left foot tap dancing. I am myself a former rider of big bikes and I still find myself exiting turns in too low a gear, waiting for torque that never arrives. When you're carving, this is less of a problem, because keeping the engine on the boil is part of the fun. When just riding to chill out, a bigger engine is much more relaxing. On my XJR1300 (for instance), I would click, click, click all the way up to top gear, and then mostly just leave it there.

Of course, the lack of torque is inevitable given the engine size, so this is not a criticism, merely an observation and an issue that somebody coming off a bigger bike might not like.
 
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the cb300f shines on back roads handles well, weight is only 348 pounds, easy to ride, bike has a good price point at least currently in 2015 without the abs, fun factor on this bike is high

low speed maneuvers with the stock gearing the throttle is a little snatchy in first gear, second gear does much better

no gear shift indicator in the all digital dash

you have links above to some handle bar riser solutions

Honda sells a seat for this model bike which is claimed to be lowered by about an inch, it's in the accessories

ride safe
 

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You know there is a lower seat option for the CB300F from Honda, right? I'm just under 5'7" and can flat foot my CB300F easily, but seat ht. is one of the first things I check.
 

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I've put 1600 km's on my CB 300 F in the past few weeks; I love it! I've been working on a YouTube review that I may or may not post, so I have some thoughts on the bike that you may enjoy reading.

The engine is surprisingly capable, but the other user was right that down-shifting is quite common in city traffic. I find it easy to down-shift, and easy to rev match if necessary. I don't find that it's a burden.

I've gotten it up to 140 km/h without much trouble, to determine whether passing on the highway was safe to perform. After 140 it seemed like it was just crawling up in speed. It's not fast per se, but I think many people would be surprised how well it performs. Acceleration takes some effort since 1st gear isn't very tall; so it becomes a question of whether I ride it all the way to the top RPM then shift, or do I shift ASAP into 2nd gear?). Once in 2nd gear it has some get-up and go, but after a couple of days it wasn't wowing me or anything.

At high speeds, crosswinds, regular wind and turbulence can cause some issues. I tuck in a bit when trucks are approaching from the opposite direction because once in a while the wind will feel like I'm being hit by a wooden board. Most of the time it's all fine and doesn't detract from long rides on the highway. It just won't be as carefree as a heavier bike. An anxious rider probably wouldn't like it though. I might get a windscreen for it.

Everything about this bike makes it incredibly easy to ride in my opinion. I took it out for a spin through my city today and I ended up riding for five hours straight!

Extremely agile bike overall; it loves being leaned over at high speed or relatively low speeds (I took it through a roundabout going about 40 km/h but I had it leaned pretty far over and it was stable and confidence inspiring).

Brakes aren't that great but downshifting will help if you need to stop quickly. Mine might get better as the whole system gets broken-in.

Long trips at highway speed vibrate the left foot peg and left handle bar, both the hand and foot will go numb since it's a very fine vibration.

Outstanding gas mileage. 5 hours of city driving took me from 4/6 bars of gas gauge to 2/6 bars. It will only need about 7 litres to go back to full. 13 litre total tank capacity.

First gear takes some getting used to; it's easy to ride the clutch for really low speed stuff like parking garages or following a vehicle in tight traffic. Taking turns in first gear winds the engine up a bit annoyingly so I tend to shift into second before taking the turn. I've shifted while in the turn and it doesn't cause the bike to do anything like it might on a bigger displacement engine.

It's light and easy to manage.

I'm 5'10" and it's generally pretty comfortable; after 1.5-2 hours if I'm leaning over too much it can get a bit uncomfortable. From my five hour run today my back started to hurt after the fourth hour; I've had intermittent back issues though (but nothing serious).

Overall it's a great bike (especially for the price!) and while I have some inclination to "upgrade" to a 500F or something similar I don't think that I actually need to.
 

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@Ravinoth Great review, really enjoyed hearing your thoughts on your first few weeks riding.
Surprised you didn't find the brakes up to scratch, generally they are rated as best in class. Possibly your pads need to bed in a bit.
Regarding the low first gear and highway vibration: You will find a change in front sprocket from 14 teeth to 15 will make a good difference on both counts. It's a popular mod with this bike.
Keep on havin fun out there. :)
 

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Thanks, I'm glad that you enjoyed the review! And thanks for the tip about the 15 tooth sprocket. That lead me to learn about how to swap it on Youtube. I'm loving this obsession with learning about everything from riding to the engineering.

How is the acceleration affected with a 15T sprocket? I don't mind the stock acceleration, but I've read that the 15T makes it feel a bit gutless. If it's a minor decrease then the benefits would outweigh the acceleration loss. One of the reasons one might upgrade from a 300 is for the acceleration though, so reducing that on a 300cc might be counter-productive for some.

Thanks for the warm welcome, everyone!
 

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Yes there is possibly a small reduction in acceleration in a going through the gears scenario, but it doesn't actually rob the engine of any horsepower if that makes sense. Like you said, the small loss is outweighed by the benefits IMO.

Its worth giving a try as its a cheap part that's easily removed if not to your liking.
 
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