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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, so a little backstory...

I've gotten my A2 license a bit over 2 years ago and haven't rode anything since but recently (2 weeks ago) I bought a SH CBR300R. Mostly because it was the cheapest one that had fuel injection and ABS.


Got a nail in my tire on 2nd day.

I knew about those kits with tar strings but I told myself that I should bring it to a tire repair shop or something, thinking they could do better... wrong! I've unmounted the rear tire and went on.

They've used the same tar strings to fix it, well whatever, tire didn't lose any pressure and seemed good enough.



Thing is, I've only realized I don't have a torque wrench to mount the tire back in at the specified values from the book so unable to get one quickly I just used a plain old wrench and put everything back together.


I rode for days after that and everything seemed in order but... today I've gone up to 110km/h (70mp/h) for the first time with it and it was kind of wonky?

I couldn't really tell what was going on but the bike seemed to go up and down like the road was made of little waves. Didn't affect control much but was a bit scary and definitely annoying.

I'll get a torque wrench to fix the rear side asap but I'm not sure that was the issue here.

So I'd like to ask you guys, did this happen to you? You know what could cause it? As well as any other tips you'd like to share with a new rider.
 

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Welcome!

Sounds like you may have a tire out of balance.
 

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Definitely unbalanced tyre. If the puncture is in the main tread it can be repaired from inside with a patch(about 50 mm diameter) and a central rubber spike. It is vulcanised and can be ridden at speed. I had this twice on the rear tyre of my 650 Deauville and each time it lasted for the life of the tyre. For balancing I use Dynabeads. Look them up on line, they are an American company but we get them here in UK. Just pour them in through the valve stem, re-insert the valve and inflate. They give a dynamic balance, better than weights on the rim. They are also re-useable so when you change your tyre, just scoop them out and put them in the new one. Used them on the Deauville and also on my CBR300.
 

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If it happened to me I would have done the tire plug repair on the side of the road and then brought it to tire shop to get a proper tire "patch repair" on the inside. So in my opinion your going to have to take the tire back off. Maybe you might want to just ride the bike to a motorcycle mechanic and have them take care of this. It will cost a few Euros but at least it will be done proper and you can move on with your life.

If you want to do it yourself there are a few tutorials on YouTube. Good luck. I myself must be blessed by God to not have a flat yet. Even today there was a huge accident on the Freeway and I was riding on the emergency shoulder to get around the swarm of stopped cars and there was all kinds of road debris that I had to zig-zag to avoid but its almost impossible to see a nail or screw and I am keeping my eye on the cars in case one of them tries to block me (There are some real jerks like that in USA they are jealous that a motorcycle is circumventing the traffic jam. Its kind of dangerous to ride the shoulder the way I did but it saved me over 1 hour of waiting time if I had just sat there in the traffic jam.

Turned out it was a MAJOR accident with fatalities and carnage that was to blame for the traffic gridlock. Traffic was backed up for many miles. There was a police car also stuck in the traffic jam but he was powerless to chase me down because he also could not move. Thats the consequence of driving a car versus a small motorcycle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Definitely unbalanced tyre. If the puncture is in the main tread it can be repaired from inside with a patch(about 50 mm diameter) and a central rubber spike. It is vulcanised and can be ridden at speed. I had this twice on the rear tyre of my 650 Deauville and each time it lasted for the life of the tyre. For balancing I use Dynabeads. Look them up on line, they are an American company but we get them here in UK. Just pour them in through the valve stem, re-insert the valve and inflate. They give a dynamic balance, better than weights on the rim. They are also re-useable so when you change your tire, just scoop them out and put them in the new one. Used them on the Deauville and also on my CBR300.

Thanks for the input, the puncture was in one of the "crevices" of the tire (sorry, I have no idea how those are actually called in english). I've been to 5 different tire services until I found one that accepted to do the work on a motorcycle tire and did that plug. I've no idea where to find one that would do a better job but I'll ask around when I get the chance. As for those beads, I've looked it up. Opinions are divided but most people said to avoid them. Regardless of that I believe I wouldn't be able to find any at a local seller anyway, maybe I could order them from Amazon or E-bay but that would take some time to arrive here. Being in a 3rd world country and all that. I'll probably end up using sticky weights and a balance stand and do it myself.


If it happened to me I would have done the tire plug repair on the side of the road and then brought it to tire shop to get a proper tire "patch repair" on the inside. So in my opinion your going to have to take the tire back off. Maybe you might want to just ride the bike to a motorcycle mechanic and have them take care of this. It will cost a few Euros but at least it will be done proper and you can move on with your life.



If you want to do it yourself there are a few tutorials on YouTube. Good luck. I myself must be blessed by God to not have a flat yet. Even today there was a huge accident on the Freeway and I was riding on the emergency shoulder to get around the swarm of stopped cars and there was all kinds of road debris that I had to zig-zag to avoid but its almost impossible to see a nail or screw and I am keeping my eye on the cars in case one of them tries to block me (There are some real jerks like that in USA they are jealous that a motorcycle is circumventing the traffic jam. Its kind of dangerous to ride the shoulder the way I did but it saved me over 1 hour of waiting time if I had just sat there in the traffic jam.

Turned out it was a MAJOR accident with fatalities and carnage that was to blame for the traffic gridlock. Traffic was backed up for many miles. There was a police car also stuck in the traffic jam but he was powerless to chase me down because he also could not move. Thats the consequence of driving a car versus a small motorcycle.

I know, right? I really thought that guy would do something better than that. I've also paid like 3/4 the value of a 5 plug kit for only 1 plug. I'll search for where I can get a patch on the inside but for now, aside from the balancing problem, the tire doesn't lose any pressure and I'm usually riding at around 50km/h (31mph) so it shouldn't be a problem I suppose.



Not doing highway riding at all, not that I wouldn't like to but those are so few here that you don't happen to be riding their way too often if at all. :D
 

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This is the one I was referring to:



Ref: https://www.wikihow.com/Patch-a-Tire

I think the tire crevice is called tire groove or tyre canal or tire tread. You may want to do a search on that, it may be dangerous to patch a tire that has a puncture inside of the groove or canal like that. You might have to replace the entire tire. Im not sure.

There are some guys that will replace a motorcycle tyre "no matter what" if it gets a puncture but that may be a little paranoid.
 

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You can usually repair a puncture in the main area of a tyre but not if it is in the sidewall. The patches that work have a central rubber plug ( about 7 or 8 cm) and look like a rubber version of an inlet or exhaust valve. The plug is pushed through the puncture hole from inside and the excess rubber cut off level with the outer tyre case. A vulcanising solution is used inside to give a good bond and pressure applied. It doesn't matter if it is in one of the sypes (grooves).
 

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You can usually repair a puncture in the main area of a tyre but not if it is in the sidewall. The patches that work have a central rubber plug ( about 7 or 8 cm) and look like a rubber version of an inlet or exhaust valve. The plug is pushed through the puncture hole from inside and the excess rubber cut off level with the outer tyre case. A vulcanising solution is used inside to give a good bond and pressure applied. It doesn't matter if it is in one of the sypes (grooves).
I’m not wanting to start a debate, maybe just a discussion. I also use tire plugs for emergency roadside repairs. After I get back home, I order a new tire. My reasoning is is that unlike a car, during cornering part of the bottom of a motorcycle tire eventually becomes a sidewall. Plugs and patches are not recommended on sidewalls because of the flexing involved in the sidewall.
When I was farming, I would plug up any agricultural tire anywhere. I did have sidewall failures on tire plugs...and the one thing I found out is you can’t put a plug in a plug.... (the failures should not be considered a scientific study..... you should of seen the raggely ol tires on most of my implements......)

I guess my point of this rambling is that plugs are great for roadside repairs, but I spend the $100 when I get home on a new tire.
 

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took a screw in rear of cbr250r, lodged firmly in center thickest rubber area..
rode it home and a couple times thereafter with almost no loss of pressure, before installing a new [set].. still life in them and that screw wouldn't move
but tyres are our only small direct contact with the road, incl braking etc..
like oil tyres are fundamental and high priority imo, and we still pay less than for a car [2 vs 4 tyres, small capacity sump]..
what priority peace of mind...
 

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Shis, I'm in full agreement here. Why take a chance? A tire failure on an automobile CAN be dangerous. A tire failure on a motorcycle WILL be dangerous. While it may be difficult to trash a tire with tread left on it, it really comes down to safety. No different than discarding that, often expensive, helmet after a "minor" fall and "minor" impact with a hard surface. "Looks OK"... Really?? Would you take that chance with the safety of your head?? Well guess what, your heads still atop that bike motoring along at 100KMPH depending on that tire you patched up last week! ;)
 

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Yeah you guys are right. Managed to convince me.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/IRC-T10306-Road-Winner-RX-01-Rear-Tire-140-70-17/333300452643

To risk my life to save $75 is indeed a foolish proposition. Or to end up with thousands of dollars of medical bills

Update: Here is the cheapest rear tire on eBay $70.28 Duro HF918

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Duro-HF918-Sport-Tire-140-70-17-66H-Rear-Bias-Tubeless/312537778683

I wonder how it compares to the stock Road Winner?

Update: Avoid the Duro HF918, reviews say the Road winners went 10k miles and the Duros only 6000. Better to pay the extra 5 quid
 

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Yeah you guys are right. Managed to convince me.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/IRC-T10306-Road-Winner-RX-01-Rear-Tire-140-70-17/333300452643

To risk my life to save $75 is indeed a foolish proposition. Or to end up with thousands of dollars of medical bills

Update: Here is the cheapest rear tire on eBay $70.28 Duro HF918

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Duro-HF918-Sport-Tire-140-70-17-66H-Rear-Bias-Tubeless/312537778683

I wonder how it compares to the stock Road Winner?

Update: Avoid the Duro HF918, reviews say the Road winners went 10k miles and the Duros only 6000. Better to pay the extra 5 quid
Hey KC I had a good run (and grip) out of these on my CBR:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Michelin-Pilot-Street-Radial-Rear-Motorcycle-Tire-size-140-70R-17-66H-29590/383086164954?epid=202930152&hash=item5931b6fbda:g:QAsAAOSwq6ddRYsu
$114 doesn't sound like crazy money for a quality tyre?
 

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I’ve heard a lot of good things about those pilots. I haven’t tried em yet, but I think I will the next time
 

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I just put on a set of the Michelin Pilots but the bias ply not the radials.
The price for the bias ply was really cheap so I couldn't resist after going through a EVO S20 set in less than 10000km.
In the first 1000km I can't complain.
I only ride for pleasure after work or on weekends so no real rain riding or commuting also we don't have very curvy roads around here.
 

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I am about 5000 km into a set of bias ply Pilots. They are lighter than the IRC, and less stiff (noticeably smoother on coarse pavement). Two things against them: they seem fussier about pressure than the IRCs, so I check it way more often (30-31 front, 31-33 rear), and they seem to reach their limit of grip a bit abruptly. Not noticeable in day-to-day use, but when pushed, I have felt them start to let go. To be fair, it has only happened in long-duration turns, particularly with a decreasing radius. I was probably not applying my best technique at the time.
 

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pirelli sports demons another non-radial option.. light, good water dispersal thus good in the wet [i tested for this over a known course with slippery surface in wet comp to irc - which had let go there], precise steering with easy turn-in to corners [took me by surprise into a local turn needing deliberate input on irc] seems to fall into turns or 'steer itself' which adds to the ride once you know its nice quick responses..

intended a set of michelins but unavailable so opted for the pirellis.. next bike [replace stolen cbr250r 'black beauty'] went for pirellis again..
anyway mate, just another recommended option..
 
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