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I just bought a 2015 Honda CBR300R and its my first bike.

I had to teach myself really how to ride, but i have a couple questions to all of you umm "senior drivers" per say.

example: lets say I'm in 5th gear and i see a red light ahead is it okay to just hold the clutch down till i stop then when i make a complete stop can i just "click" all the way down to first?

is using the front brakes all the time okay?

Can y'all just tell me things not to do to mess up my bike?


I think i can handle my bike and I've been riding bikes for awhile just don't know it all. Its kind of like people who play guitar really good but don't know what key they're playing you know.


Thanks everyone!!
 

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I just bought a 2015 Honda CBR300R and its my first bike.

example: lets say I'm in 5th gear and i see a red light ahead is it okay to just hold the clutch down till i stop then when i make a complete stop can i just "click" all the way down to first?

Thanks everyone!!
Welcome and congratulations!

I have been riding for the past 12-13 years but not so much over the past 3-4 years. Been on a 100cc and 150cc. Both Honda.

When I see a red and let's say I'm in 5th, I gradually start slowing and downshifting 5,4,3,2,1,N. I would say it's the best way, for the bike and also for your safety. When you hold the clutch, the bike starts free rolling and you will not have any engine braking assist. Engine braking is very important and it makes stopping much more easier so I would recommend gradual downshift.

Also, stopping your bike in 5th gear and then shifting all the way down to N maybe not a smooth downshifting in some cases. You may have to move back and forth a little.

And let's say the light turns green while you are still holding clutch on 5th, you won't be able to move quickly. You have to wait and shift all way down to 1 and then start moving. Not a good idea.

Cheers!! Happy riding :D
 

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Welcome to the Ride Red addiction, my friend... you will surely love it to no end. You did get the red one, right? haha

I also, in your scenario, think it will depend on how fast you need to stop. If you got the time before that red light, practice your engine braking, matching your gears to your speed (speeds per gear is covered in your manual). I normally roll off the throttle, downshift, roll on then off, downshift, roll on then off, downshift, and continue that pattern until about 2nd gear then start using my brakes. I always try to stop the bike in 1st if I can. If I stop in second, oh well. And hopefully a member on here will correct me if I am wrong with what I have told you :)
 

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Whether right or wrong, I'll toss in my input for how I've been downshifting when I approach a red light or stop sign: I smoothly / gradually start to squeeze onto both my hand and foot lever brakes with a consistent amount of pressure and timing. And while I have the braking going, I squeeze onto my clutch lever all the way and I gradually click down one gear at a time while my speed reduces... As I'm clicking down each gear, I've practiced myself mentally to match the gear with the speed without actually performing this on the bike, if that makes sense. I'm prepared to rev match (blip) in reality if the light turns green...

I usually brake and rev match downshift prior to approaching corners / turns or when I've slowed down and am in need to smoothly transition the bike into the right gear / engine speed just prior to building my acceleration when exiting out or even to help keep up my momentum.

With this said, I sometimes do practice rev match downshifting when approaching a red light... However, I do use caution since I've been taught to depend on the brakes for slowing down, and not the engine. Safety wise, one of the disadvantages I've learned is that the vehicles behind you will not see your brake lights coming on and may not be able to understand that you're slowing, hence causing a delayed reaction. Likely can become another reason for them to hit a motorcyclist from behind when we already have a lesser hand on safety.

I've only been riding for a little over 2 months and 1,500 miles, so this is my rookie input, and I will understand if I need to be corrected and educated on some areas. I'm keeping an open mind and I'm all ears (and eyes :p)...
 
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Jdowning1298, it is all a matter of opinion. some riding course teachers will tell you brake pads are cheaper than a clutch, e,g, don't engine break. yet they teach you to match your gear to your speed, lol...


personally I do both. I will downshift sometimes, sometimes I will pull the clutch and coast.


most of the time I clutch and coast. I still down shift, I just don't let the clutch out. if you clutch and coast without down shifting. you may get stuck in a gear. I have had it happen where I can't get into 1st because of it. it is rare though. even if you clutch coast and shift at least once, you won't gut stuck.


my advice, just be careful of your speed when you down shift. there is nothing worse than down shifting, letting out the clutch at a speed a little high when you don't expect it. engine breaking will jerk the bike. it will nose dive and the rear will want to come around and give you a kiss. I had a sportster 883 I wasn't used to. 3rd to 2nd sucked. almost lost the bike on more than one occasion because the change in gears was steep. thing would fish tail all the time. the worst I have done on the 300, so far, is a bad nose dive. try to avoid transferring so much weight to the front. bikes handle best when you can keep the front and rear suspension balanced. best of luck to you.
 
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lets say I'm in 5th gear and i see a red light ahead is it okay to just hold the clutch down till i stop then when i make a complete stop can i just "click" all the way down to first?
You should hold in the clutch and coast to the light while shifting down as the bikes speed decreases. You should always be in the correct gear for the speed the bike is moving. That way if you have to get on the gas and get out of trouble the bike is in the correct gear and you're ready to let the clutch out and get out of there.

You asked: " is using the front brakes all the time okay?"

Depends on road conditions. You are using the back brake too I'd hope! The front brake has more stopping power than the rear does but when it locks up you will lose control. Wet roads get less front brake. You should learn when the front brake will break loose. If you go to a parking lot and go about 20 MPH and lock up the front tire for just a split second you'll train yourself to let go of the front brake when it locks up. Do it really really quick. REALLY QUICK! Just lock it and let off. You're brain will learn to let off the brake when it locks. Do it on dry pavement when you're not turning. Same with the rear. Get to know whats to much and what's not. A lot of people crash by locking up the front brake and not letting off of it when it does lock up.

Is there anyplace around you that offers a riders course? If so take it. Everyone should.
 

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I do what 300F does. As I slow down I gradually downshift while holding the clutch to coast. In that case if something happens and I need to speed up I'm already in the right gear and I can just slowly release the clutch and give some throttle and off I go.

As far as the front brake it should be your main source of stopping power. just be gradual about it and use the back brake too.
 

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...When I see a red and let's say I'm in 5th, I gradually start slowing and downshifting 5,4,3,2,1,N. I would say it's the best way, for the bike and also for your safety. When you hold the clutch, the bike starts free rolling and you will not have any engine braking assist. Engine braking is very important and it makes stopping much more easier so I would recommend gradual downshift.

Also, stopping your bike in 5th gear and then shifting all the way down to N maybe not a smooth downshifting in some cases. You may have to move back and forth a little.

And let's say the light turns green while you are still holding clutch on 5th, you won't be able to move quickly. You have to wait and shift all way down to 1 and then start moving. Not a good idea...
... practice your engine braking, matching your gears to your speed (speeds per gear is covered in your manual). I normally roll off the throttle, downshift, roll on then off, downshift, roll on then off, downshift, and continue that pattern until about 2nd gear then start using my brakes. I always try to stop the bike in 1st if I can. If I stop in second, oh well... [/COLOR]
These guys ^ are more or less describing how to do it right.

As far as the other posts in this thread that describe coasting to a stop while holding the clutch lever in and shifting through all the gears at once... well, that's not the safe & proper way to downshift a motorcycle gearbox. Coasting is a bad idea, as is shifting straight through the gearbox.

Correct downshifting for normal riding situations involves letting the clutch lever back out between each and every downshift while blipping the throttle to rev match each gear to the corresponding lower road speed, and thus allowing engine braking to do the majority of the work in initially slowing the bike from higher speeds in the upper gears, while progressively using more of the front & rear brakes during the lower gear downshifts as the bike approaches its stop. The only downshift that I don't let the clutch lever back out is between 2nd and 1st... by the time I get to that shift, the bike is already slowed down to just a few MPH, and at that point I'm only using the brakes to bring the bike to a full stop.
 

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These guys ^ are more or less describing how to do it right.

As far as the other posts in this thread that describe coasting to a stop while holding the clutch lever in and shifting through all the gears at once... well, that's not the safe & proper way to downshift a motorcycle gearbox. Coasting is a bad idea, as is shifting straight through the gearbox.

Correct downshifting for normal riding situations involves letting the clutch lever back out between each and every downshift while blipping the throttle to rev match each gear to the corresponding lower road speed, and thus allowing engine braking to do the majority of the work in initially slowing the bike from higher speeds in the upper gears, while progressively using more of the front & rear brakes during the lower gear downshifts as the bike approaches its stop. The only downshift that I don't let the clutch lever back out is between 2nd and 1st... by the time I get to that shift, the bike is already slowed down to just a few MPH, and at that point I'm only using the brakes to bring the bike to a full stop.
This makes sense. I'm going to start practicing this to see how it feels. :)
 

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Correct downshifting for normal riding situations involves letting the clutch lever back out between each and every downshift while blipping the throttle to rev match each gear to the corresponding lower road speed, and thus allowing engine braking to do the majority of the work in initially slowing the bike from higher speeds in the upper gears, while progressively using more of the front & rear brakes during the lower gear downshifts as the bike approaches its stop. The only downshift that I don't let the clutch lever back out is between 2nd and 1st... by the time I get to that shift, the bike is already slowed down to just a few MPH, and at that point I'm only using the brakes to bring the bike to a full stop.


I thought this technique was mostly for racing? I have seen the Keith code twist of the wrist a couple of times. I know much of what they talk about is track as well as road. I think the down shift mention is probably better learned in person and practiced. I know I didn't really catch on to the video.


I know coasting is not the best idea. i wouldn't recommend it to any one either. i didn't really agree with instructors advising brake pads are cheaper than clutches. that vague statement implies you will either clutch and coast, or run your bike until it chokes out at such a low speed that can't match your gear. i think the cbr300is a nice transmission and downshifts very well. ok, well from 6 down to like 3. i am not a bug fan of 1st ad 2nd on our bikes lol....then again i am new to sport bikes. v-twins are not the same and i am still learning.
 

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The whole idea behind re-engaging the clutch and rev matching between downshifts is so that you will always be in the correct gear for any given road speed, and you will be able to get back on the throttle and accelerate away if the situation calls for it.

For example, when you are approaching an intersection in the distance and your light is red, so you begin to decrease your speed in preparation to stop for the red light. But as you are slowing down, your light turns green... if you had just been coasting with the clutch pulled in without downshifting, and only using the brakes to reduce your speed you would find that the bike is in too high of a gear to be able to accelerate away. And if there is traffic behind you, you can bet that they will begin to accelerate when that light turns green... bad situation for you to be in, with your transmission in the wrong (too high) gear relative to the lower road speed that you're moving at. Now you've got no choice but to quickly downshift and hope that you get to the correct gear in order to accelerate quickly out of potential trouble (vehicles accelerating behind you), and hope that you don't downshift too far to a gear that is too low for the current road speed you're moving at, which could cause the rear tire to break loose (and send your tachometer needle instantly into the red zone).
 

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The whole idea behind re-engaging the clutch and rev matching between downshifts is so that you will always be in the correct gear for any given road speed, and you will be able to get back on the throttle and accelerate away if the situation calls for it.

For example, when you are approaching an intersection in the distance and your light is red, so you begin to decrease your speed in preparation to stop for the red light. But as you are slowing down, your light turns green... if you had just been coasting with the clutch pulled in without downshifting, and only using the brakes to reduce your speed you would find that the bike is in too high of a gear to be able to accelerate away. And if there is traffic behind you, you can bet that they will begin to accelerate when that light turns green... bad situation for you to be in, with your transmission in the wrong (too high) gear relative to the lower road speed that you're moving at. Now you've got no choice but to quickly downshift and hope that you get to the correct gear in order to accelerate quickly out of potential trouble (vehicles accelerating behind you), and hope that you don't downshift too far to a gear that is too low for the current road speed you're moving at, which could cause the rear tire to break loose (and send your tachometer needle instantly into the red zone).
You couldn't have explained any better. Perfect!
 

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moto mike, I meant the rev blimp when down shifting. I thought that was primarily a racing technique. as opposed to regular down shifting. I have driven manual trans cars a lot. I don't clutch and blimp the gas when down shifting. I get the principle of down shifting to match speed and gear. I was just curious about the clutch and quick rev blimp during the process. or maybe I miss understood.


I do agree. many drivers out there are impatient and worse, think they own the road and the world owes them. I live in an area where too many people drive with an I don't care attitude towards everyone. what is worse a very lazy I don't care. it is so scary at times.
 

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moto mike, I meant the rev blimp when down shifting. I thought that was primarily a racing technique. as opposed to regular down shifting. I have driven manual trans cars a lot. I don't clutch and blimp the gas when down shifting. I get the principle of down shifting to match speed and gear. I was just curious about the clutch and quick rev blimp during the process. or maybe I miss understood...
Bringing the RPM's up a bit as you release the clutch is just part of the normal downshifting technique for a motorcycle. It serves to match the engine RPM's to the lower gear ratio and the bike's road speed. If you don't blip the throttle, the engine RPM's will go up anyway as you release the clutch, however by blipping the throttle the transition between the lower gear and the bike's road speed will be nearly seamless. Either way, the engine RPM's are going to increase after a downshift... blipping the throttle is proactive, not blipping the throttle is reactive (with the engine RPM reacting to the lower gear ratio and the road speed).

With cars it's a bit different... for typical downshifting in a car with a manual transmission, you're normally doing a lot more braking at the same time when downshifting a car weighing several thousand pounds on the street, so the RPM 'spike' isn't as severe due to having scrubbed off more speed with the brakes. That said, a car on a track with a manual gear box being driven close to the limit, would also require rev matching on downshifts when going into corners for optimum cornering speed, in order to put down the fastest possible lap times.
 

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Bringing the RPM's up a bit as you release the clutch is just part of the normal downshifting technique for a motorcycle. It serves to match the engine RPM's to the lower gear ratio and the bike's road speed. If you don't blip the throttle, the engine RPM's will go up anyway as you release the clutch, however by blipping the throttle the transition between the lower gear and the bike's road speed will be nearly seamless. Either way, the engine RPM's are going to increase after a downshift... blipping the throttle is proactive, not blipping the throttle is reactive (with the engine RPM reacting to the lower gear ratio and the road speed).

With cars it's a bit different... for typical downshifting in a car with a manual transmission, you're normally doing a lot more braking at the same time when downshifting a car weighing several thousand pounds on the street, so the RPM 'spike' isn't as severe due to having scrubbed off more speed with the brakes. That said, a car on a track with a manual gear box being driven close to the limit, would also require rev matching on downshifts when going into corners for optimum cornering speed, in order to put down the fastest possible lap times.
Gotta' love Heel-and-Toe downshifting on those cars! :laugh:
 

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Correct downshifting for normal riding situations involves letting the clutch lever back out between each and every downshift while blipping the throttle to rev match each gear to the corresponding lower road speed, and thus allowing engine braking to do the majority of the work in initially slowing the bike from higher speeds in the upper gears, while progressively using more of the front & rear brakes during the lower gear downshifts as the bike approaches its stop. The only downshift that I don't let the clutch lever back out is between 2nd and 1st... by the time I get to that shift, the bike is already slowed down to just a few MPH, and at that point I'm only using the brakes to bring the bike to a full stop.
This

This is exactly what I do (although I'm a poor blipper). Since our gears are so short, 2nd to 1st in the only one I skip when the speed is so low

With good engine braking, you almost don't need the brake till the end. I only grab a tiny bit just so my brake lights show
 

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I only grab a tiny bit just so my brake lights show
Yep, that the trick. you want those brake lights to show so I guess that would be a small downfall of the engine braking. I also grab the break (in a blinking fashion) so people see it light up. Especially at night.
 
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