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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I'm a first time bike owner that is looking to do some maintenance myself so that I can save some money and also get myself more in tune with my motorcycle. I've done some basic work like cleaning/replacing air filters and oil changes in my car so I'm not a total noob, but I don't have any experience when it comes to motorcycles.

I'm currently at a little over 600 miles, I did a hard break in (well, the best that I could manage as a new rider haha) and got the oil changed, chain cleaned and adjusted, at 310 miles. After doing some research on the forums it seems I can wait until 1,000 miles for my second oil change, but I would need to do the 600 mile service. From what I read on here, it seems that the only thing you would need to do would be an oil change and cleaning/adjusting/lubing the chain. And since I got an oil change already at 300 miles, I'd just need to clean/lube/adjust the chain, correct?

I'm also looking for advice on what tools to purchase, it seems like I'd need the following:

Rear stand: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DO3AC1C/ (found this mentioned by someone here and it seems like a decent deal, I'm just wondering if I need to get a combo one for the front wheel as well?

Chain grease: Any specific brand recommendations?

Chain brush: Any specific recommendations?

Also, what are the tools I'll need specifically to adjust the chain? My roommate has a basic toolkit but I'd like to start getting my own stuff and make a collection.

Sorry for the noob questions, and thanks in advance!
 

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Apart from a good set ot of spanners sockets, allen keys and screwdrivers to check and tighten fasteners, I don't think you need anything else for a long time, as for chain lube I use 90w gear oil, just brush it on the chain and wipe off excess with a very oily cloth once a week (150 miles). The chain is lubed internally so all you are doing is protecting it from surface rust and keeping your o rings wet so they don't wear out, the gear oil has the advantage of working like a scott oiler you get very little fling with it and your sprocket housing doesn't get clogged with grease, chain stays nice and clean, ive done it this way for years and my chains have been rust free and clean even with our salted roads in winter.
I use 1/4 sockets on small fasteners and 3/8 on larger and bought a Halfords 3/8 torque wrench which are made by Norbar a few years back.

Good luck and enjoy your bike.
Mark
 

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Can anybody tell me where this idea of a 'hard break in' came from, and why it is recommended? I understand the reasoning behind the 'traditional' running-in procedure, but so far haven't seen any explanation of the benefits of alternative procedures. My whole career has been spent in high technology manufacturing and high precision engineering (scientific instrumentation) and the idea of a hard break-in gives me the heebie jeebies.
 
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I'm currently at a little over 600 miles and got the oil changed, chain cleaned and adjusted, at 310 miles. After doing some research on the forums it seems I can wait until 1,000 miles for my second oil change, but I would need to do the 600 mile service. From what I read on here, it seems that the only thing you would need to do would be an oil change and cleaning/adjusting/lubing the chain. And since I got an oil change already at 300 miles, I'd just need to clean/lube/adjust the chain, correct?
Welcome to the forum capeta. Since your conversant with changing the oil and filter now I wouldn't worry about the 600 mile service unless you really want your service manual stamped to be able to show the nxt owner. There's not much in it other than them adjusting and lubing chains and cables etc which you seem keen to learn to do yourself. May as well save your money IMO.

Can anybody tell me where this idea of a 'hard break in' came from, and why it is recommended? I understand the reasoning behind the 'traditional' running-in procedure, but so far haven't seen any explanation of the benefits of alternative procedures. My whole career has been spent in high technology manufacturing and high precision engineering (scientific instrumentation) and the idea of a hard break-in gives me the heebie jeebies.
My understanding of the benefit of the hard break in is that you end up with a better (closer tolerance) fit between your rings and bore which in turn helps maintain a high compression ratio thus better performance.
The hard initial running forces the rings against the rough surface of the freshly machined bore and the two bed together through abrasion to form a good match.
That's what I read on the internet anyways and I believe everything i read on here :laugh: ;)
 

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Welcome to the forum, don't worry about the questions its no biggy.

(Q) I'm also looking for advice on what tools to purchase, it seems like I'd need the following:

Rear stand: Amazon Amazon (found this mentioned by someone here and it seems like a decent deal, I'm just wondering if I need to get a combo one for the front wheel as well? (A) Yes a paddock stand is always a useful addition and if you can get both front and rear even better. As I can see no local for you in your stats I assume you are a distance from your dealer and as such will be undertaking your own maintenance?

(Q) Chain grease: Any specific brand recommendations? (A) As for Chain lube I prefer a white grease in an aerosol, check out some of the advice on youtube for application also a chain cleaner. my recommendation here is do it often it saves a fortune.

(Q) Chain brush: Any specific recommendations? (A) for a brush then any stiff bristle brush will do I use a paint brush along with the chain cleaner and a cloth to get the mess off. OBTW you will need gloves surgical type "its a dirty job and someone has to do it"

(Q) Also, what are the tools I'll need specifically to adjust the chain? My roommate has a basic toolkit but I'd like to start getting my own stuff and make a collection. (A) A basic set of metric combi spanners will do to start with along with some Allen keys and a Torque wrench to set the Torque values on the critical nuts and bolts and a socket set would be good

Anything else feel free to ask.;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks everyone for the advice!

Welcome to the forum, don't worry about the questions its no biggy.

(Q) I'm also looking for advice on what tools to purchase, it seems like I'd need the following:

Rear stand: Amazon Amazon (found this mentioned by someone here and it seems like a decent deal, I'm just wondering if I need to get a combo one for the front wheel as well? (A) Yes a paddock stand is always a useful addition and if you can get both front and rear even better. As I can see no local for you in your stats I assume you are a distance from your dealer and as such will be undertaking your own maintenance?

(Q) Chain grease: Any specific brand recommendations? (A) As for Chain lube I prefer a white grease in an aerosol, check out some of the advice on youtube for application also a chain cleaner. my recommendation here is do it often it saves a fortune.

(Q) Chain brush: Any specific recommendations? (A) for a brush then any stiff bristle brush will do I use a paint brush along with the chain cleaner and a cloth to get the mess off. OBTW you will need gloves surgical type "its a dirty job and someone has to do it"

(Q) Also, what are the tools I'll need specifically to adjust the chain? My roommate has a basic toolkit but I'd like to start getting my own stuff and make a collection. (A) A basic set of metric combi spanners will do to start with along with some Allen keys and a Torque wrench to set the Torque values on the critical nuts and bolts and a socket set would be good

Anything else feel free to ask.;)
Awesome, this was very helpful information! I'm located in Los Angeles, I'll update my profile. There are plenty of dealers near me but I'd like to start doing my own maintenance to save money and I like working with my hands. I'm going to buy the tools and a center stand today, I'll be sure to check back in once I have all the stuff and I'm ready to attempt the chain cleaning!

I did have one other question though, for the 600 mile service kiwi rider mentioned something about adjusting cables. Do you know what exactly I would have to do for that?

Thanks again!
 

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I did have one other question though, for the 600 mile service kiwi rider mentioned something about adjusting cables. Do you know what exactly I would have to do for that?

Thanks again!
Its the free play in the throttle cable in particular that needs taken up as the cable stretches a bit when new. Motomike posted a 'how to' on this, see link below.

If your clutch lever has excessive play in it then this can be adjusted out by following the steps in your manual. Its on page 68 and 69 in mine.

http://www.cbr300forum.com/forum/how-forum/3297-how-throttle-free-play-adjustment.html
 

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Hi. I know there is another thread with bike stand info but I just bought these from GP Bikes online and they seem ok. The stand is a set. Front and rear stands. The rear works for sure. The front hasn't been tested but there is a YouTube video with a guy using these on a cbr 250. For the price...you can't go wrong. I bought them for oil changes etc. I hope this helps. http://gpbikes.com/street/accessories/stands/oxford-big-black-bike-stand-combo.html
 

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Hi. I know there is another thread with bike stand info but I just bought these from GP Bikes online and they seem ok. The stand is a set. Front and rear stands. The rear works for sure. The front hasn't been tested but there is a YouTube video with a guy using these on a cbr 250. For the price...you can't go wrong. I bought them for oil changes etc. I hope this helps. Oxford Big Black Bike Stand- Combo - Stands & Spools - Accessories - Street
Thanks for the heads up! I saw a set of Venom front and rear stands that are slightly cheaper, is there anything in particular about the GP Bikes ones that are good? Sorry if this is a vague question...
 

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Thanks for the heads up! I saw a set of Venom front and rear stands that are slightly cheaper, is there anything in particular about the GP Bikes ones that are good? Sorry if this is a vague question...
Hi capeta. They're probably the same thing. I'm in Ontario and its a local bike store. So I ordered it through them. Free shipping and it's in Canadian dollars. I like to support the local guys :). The Venoms should work too.
 
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