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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed something that may become a trend moving forward. Once is happenstance, two times coincidence, three times a fad.

I noticed with the KTM Duke and now the CBR300R that low displacement launches tend to be backwards of what we've come to expect from manufacturers. We expect in North America and Europe that bikes will be released just before our Spring, but if these two examples are to be believed the focus is swapping to developing nations.

There has been a shift in releases from Spring of the Northern Hemisphere to Spring of the Southern Hemisphere. You know, our Fall...

We'll see if this continues..
 

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affordability is the trend in every market right now. in every hobby i tend or interest in.

affordable is what the economy wants and what consumers want.

not everyone can afford a cbr1000rr and the insurance that comes along with it.
 

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Well, you have to keep in mind that these small displacement bikes are being produced as "World Market Bikes", and as such the demand for them is very high (as well as being very profitable for the manufacturers, based on the shear volume of production & sales). Unlike the bigger displacement bikes which are produced in much smaller numbers for select markets like North America & Europe. In fact, throughout most parts of the world, whether you can afford it or not is basically irrelevant when it comes to sport bikes like the CBR600RR and the 1000RR... you simply cannot walk into a Honda dealership and easily buy those bikes in countries like India, Japan, etc.
 

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Its kinda funny now that emerging markets and developed economies both want affordable small displacement bikes. The big bikes will mainly be sold in NA and Europe, but small bikes are being sold everywhere. It starts to make me rethink the division between emerging markets and developed markets. Everyone wants an affordable, good quality machine. I don't think that power is the top priority for most people these days.
 

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Well, you have to keep in mind that these small displacement bikes are being produced as "World Market Bikes", and as such the demand for them is very high (as well as being very profitable for the manufacturers, based on the shear volume of production & sales). Unlike the bigger displacement bikes which are produced in much smaller numbers for select markets like North America & Europe. In fact, throughout most parts of the world, whether you can afford it or not is basically irrelevant when it comes to sport bikes like the CBR600RR and the 1000RR... you simply cannot walk into a Honda dealership and easily buy those bikes in countries like India, Japan, etc.
to be fair in most parts of asia you really can't use a cbr600rr or a 1000rr anywhere close to its intended use.

so the market for those are very small or non existent.
 

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Its kinda funny now that emerging markets and developed economies both want affordable small displacement bikes. The big bikes will mainly be sold in NA and Europe, but small bikes are being sold everywhere. It starts to make me rethink the division between emerging markets and developed markets. Everyone wants an affordable, good quality machine. I don't think that power is the top priority for most people these days.
Most just want to go from A to B and a bike like the CBR250 and CBR300 offers that with some fun. So how I see it they work well as world bikes.

The trend for this is growing too.

Give it time, in another 15-20 years or more we'll see even more higher powered bikes being global, same with cars. Those developing nations will become even wealthier, improving in the percentages in the hundreds.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
another massive factor, particularly in SE Asia is that they have special tax incentives for those who ride 250's and below.

One thing we might also want to consider, and it was one of @MotoMike's posts in another thread that sparked the idea. Mike relayed that he noticed in Canada dealers have slashed a $1000 off the MSRP of CBR250s. Now looking globally the Ninja 300 has been eating the CBR250s lunch sales wise...

So I wonder if the delay was simply to allow old 250 stock to clear before flooding the dealers with a similar bike at a similar price point?
 

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the price cuts make the 250 very worth it

you must really want the extra displacement to wait for the 300.
Not to mention that the CBR250R is every bit as much fun to ride as what the 300R will be... contrary to what some may want to believe, those extra 36cc are not going to make for a huge, earth shattering performance difference between the two bikes, and certainly not in the hands of a new, first time rider. It would take the experience of a seasoned rider on a race track* to be able to really exploit those few extra horsepower that the 300R will have at the top of the power curve.

* Any idiot can hold the throttle wide open going down a straight road. At sea level and under ideal conditions, a CBR250R will reach top speeds in the range of 95 to 100 MPH, and it can easily cruise at freeway speeds of 70 to 80 MPH all day long.
 

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the price cuts make the 250 very worth it

you must really want the extra displacement to wait for the 300.
With the delay, I think most people will just buy the CBR250. Its hard to justify waiting 9 months for just 50cc of extra displacement, especially considering it will cost more than the CBR250.

Do you think that will end up hurting CBR300 sales when the bike eventually does come out? Will it even out in the long run?
 

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With the delay, I think most people will just buy the CBR250. Its hard to justify waiting 9 months for just 50cc of extra displacement, especially considering it will cost more than the CBR250.
It's 36cc, not 50cc.

Do you think that will end up hurting CBR300 sales when the bike eventually does come out? Will it even out in the long run?
I doubt it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
No i dont think the exta 36cc's will make much of a difference in the long run. I think that may of partially factored into Honda's decision. In my opinion the jump to 300 is a pure marketing play, now Honda can say they're on a level field with the Ninja 300...

I bet theres even going to be salesmen who will be hard pressed to differentiate ;)
 

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No i dont think the exta 36cc's will make much of a difference in the long run. I think that may of partially factored into Honda's decision. In my opinion the jump to 300 is a pure marketing play, now Honda can say they're on a level field with the Ninja 300...

I bet theres even going to be salesmen who will be hard pressed to differentiate ;)
sounds just about right to me.
and it comes at a good time, at a time when I think Yamaha will be coming out with a 300cc bike, the R3. Still not sure if it will actually be 300cc's
 

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sounds just about right to me.
and it comes at a good time, at a time when I think Yamaha will be coming out with a 300cc bike, the R3. Still not sure if it will actually be 300cc's
So... what "sounds just about right", or "comes at a good time"? The "new" 300R? That Honda has delayed the production of the 300R? :confused::confused::confused: I have no idea what you're trying to say here.

Seriously Ortega, it seems with so many of your posts I can re-read them half a dozen times (or more), and try as I might, I still don't have the slightest clue as to what you are trying to say... it's as if your posts are written as riddles. So I have to ask... is english your first language?
 

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How much more do you think it will be?
How can you even put a price on an internet rumor?... which is all the R3 is at this point.
 
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