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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last wkd was a long holiday one so I took the opportunity to visit my folks in the neighboring province 150 miles away.
First long ride after the winter, great to be back out there on the machine again despite some strong spring winds which are typical for the area this time of year. At times I was down to 50MPH so I could safely maintain my lane position, the little CBR sure gets knocked around in the gusts.
Mostly tho I had tail winds and I averaged 34km/l (80MPG US) for the journey despite some spirited riding at times on the curvy bits. :D

 

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Oh, that landscape...I'm drooling. What have you done to all the trees, though? Even though your seasons are upside down you're blessed with these beautiful roads. Our Ontario roads are straight. Very straight. When we get a road with more than two curves they call it "scenic".
 

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Oh, that landscape...I'm drooling. What have you done to all the trees, though? Even though your seasons are upside down you're blessed with these beautiful roads. Our Ontario roads are straight. Very straight. When we get a road with more than two curves they call it "scenic".
Try where I live ...lots of hills and curves. I was in Ottawa last month and the terrain was flat as a pancake.
 

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Last wkd was a long holiday one so I took the opportunity to visit my folks in the neighboring province 150 miles away.
First long ride after the winter, great to be back out there on the machine again despite some strong spring winds which are typical for the area this time of year. At times I was down to 50MPH so I could safely maintain my lane position, the little CBR sure gets knocked around in the gusts.
Mostly tho I had tail winds and I averaged 34km/l (80MPG US) for the journey despite some spirited riding at times on the curvy bits. :D

You lucky bugger... we are just looking forward (NOT) to another Winter.:(

Beautiful area you live in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Oh, that landscape...I'm drooling. What have you done to all the trees, though? Even though your seasons are upside down you're blessed with these beautiful roads. Our Ontario roads are straight. Very straight. When we get a road with more than two curves they call it "scenic".
Firstly the native Maori folk lit fires to flush out the last of the (now extinct) Moa which was a big flightless bird. Then my British ancestors came along and cleared most of the rest for grazing stock.
We still have some reasonable size National Parks full of virgin forest luckily.

Yes, it's a great country for motorcycling :)
 

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Sweet... Would love to have a taste of those bends and beautiful roads sooner than later.
 

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Kiwi... You are immortalized..well your bike is....the pic is my new background. :)
 

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Kiwi is superb at taking beautiful pics which spark our imaginations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Kiwi... You are immortalized..well your bike is....the pic is my new background. :)
My bike feels honoured!
Kiwi is superb at taking beautiful pics which spark our imaginations.
Thanks Fanatic, it's not hard to get good snaps in this country, I never take it for granted tho.
 

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No trees: likely need a lot of space for crops and pasture to grow the millions of lamb they export every year?

Not trying to start any flame war of whatever, but I've never visited Australia, New Zealand... In the past I thought of maybe going to Australia. Is it worth it to try to do both in a trip? Besides cool landscapes, also sea side... do folks do some kind of "Lord of the Rings" tourism going to see the mountains?

BTW: Rugby world cup: Kiwis vs. Australians: that's going to be some epic match...
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
No trees: likely need a lot of space for crops and pasture to grow the millions of lamb they export every year?

Not trying to start any flame war of whatever, but I've never visited Australia, New Zealand... In the past I thought of maybe going to Australia. Is it worth it to try to do both in a trip? Besides cool landscapes, also sea side... do folks do some kind of "Lord of the Rings" tourism going to see the mountains?

BTW: Rugby world cup: Kiwis vs. Australians: that's going to be some epic match...
Yep, lots of sheep farmers here, my Father was one. Hence got my start on dirt bikes. In recent years a lot of farmers have switched to dairy cows tho as big demand world wide for our dairy products.

OK lets see if i can flame up JNO here...
If you come down this part of the world you should come to NZ first so that way if you run out of time to see Australia then you can go home content that you saw the best bit! :laugh:

Well I never thought I'd be talking about rugby (our national game) on this forum but since you mention it... Some stats: Since 1903 we have beaten Australia 105 times, they have beaten us only 42 times.
I guess you could say we are quietly confident about the World Cup final this Saturday. :D
 

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OK lets see if i can flame up JNO here...
If you come down this part of the world you should come to NZ first so that way if you run out of time to see Australia then you can go home content that you saw the best bit! :laugh:......
I think you're right - do Enzed first.

They head over to Oz to dry out. :devil:

TBH, trying to do both in one trip wouldn't feel like a holiday. You'd just be ticking stuff off a list and not really feeling the experience. There's a big difference between rocking up to a famous beach, sitting on it for a hour or two then dashing off to your next destination - and spending a night or three there, so you can experience it at dawn, dusk and the middle of the night. Having time to chat with locals over a beer, or track down the best coffee and breakfast rolls just as the parrots wake up.

Nah, you can't enjoy iconic locations if you have one eye on the time.

Also, Oz is big, just like 'merca. Getting around takes time. Flying is usually best, if you want to visit multiple cities, many of which are surrounded by a vast expanse of bugger all.

My recommendation for first-timers to Oz would be Sydney and South East Queensland (Brisbane etc). These two are not too far apart (90min flight) or you could comfortably make a nice, one-week drive up the very beautiful coast between the two.

Sydney is a great city with a gorgeous harbour. I would say three nights is sufficient though. You must see the Opera House, do a boat trip in the harbour, buy a stupid hat with dangly corks on it (made in China) and have a bucket of shrimp for dinner at Darling Harbour, listening to the street musicians. Outside the city, a trip up to the Blue Mountains or the Hunter Valley (wine region) is worthwhile.

Driving up the coast you will pass through a few really nice coastal towns such as Coffs Harbour and Byron Bay (hippieville, so avoid breathing-in while in public places). As you approach the border between New South Wales and Queensland, the landscape gets more and more tropical. Entering QLD, first stop is the Gold Coast, which is Australia's Miami I guess - brash and glitzy in a slightly small-town way. Great fun for youngsters, with lots of bars and nightclubs, plus endless beaches. Go to see the burlesque at Dracula's Nighclub - highly recommended and, if you like Thai food, dinner at ChiangMai Thai is a must. Just inland is the Gold Coast Hinterland and Springbrook National Park, with waterfalls, towering Gum and Fig trees, plus lots of highly visible wildlife. I once encountered a 4 metre python on a walk up there.

Brisbane is lovely. Only just big enough to qualify as a city, TBH, which means we get most of the benefits of city life, and not too many of the drawbacks. Laid back, like most of Oz, with a lovely tourist spot adjacent to the river called Southbank Parklands, where you can swim in a huge public pool, then dry off on the grass as hungry Water Dragons wait nearby for tidbits. It's a good spot for dinner, after the sun goes down, too.

Then head north for about 45mins to the Glasshouse Mountains area - a fertile range where everything from macadamias to bananas and pineapples is grown. There are some great walks in the region, through villages, up and down small mountains or along rivers. Again, the brilliantly-coloured Rainbow Lorikeets are everywhere, usually arguing among themselves over whose twig or pebble is whose.

Finally, make time to drop into Noosa, another coastal town. My favourite spot in the area. Relatively quiet, with plenty of nice safe beaches. Walk along Hastings Street, buy a 'Flat White' (milk coffee) or espresso and watch people parade by in their underwear (as far as I'm concerned, a bikini is only swimwear if you're on the beach). Say "G'day" to the locals and ask which fishing charter you should go on. Maybe you'll catch a nice tuna for dinner. You could barbecue it on the beach, accompanied by a nice Australian sauvignon blanc from the Margaret River region (best whites in Oz).

OK, that's about three weeks, so the rest will have to wait till your next visit. Melbourne maybe? How about the Far North or the Kimberley? Wanna see a giant 'Freshie'? Just head up to Cairns or Darwin then, the buggers are HUUUGE up there.

Maybe come for Christmas? :D

 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
@JNO Nice write up, you should be working for the Australian tourism promotions dept. :laugh:
 
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