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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This post is intended to persuade people to extend their riding season.
Please note:

Temperatures below 32 F can result in freezing roads. Salt and additives can result in damage to your bike. Do not ride above your skill level and take special precautions in cold weather.

I ride rain or shine , sleet and snow. I rarely get wet and cold.

Here is a easy way to stay warm and safe for people on a budget, as well as layering tips.

The concept of layering is ideal in altering climates. It however can be inconvenient as well. If you are a daily rider to and from work in cold temperatures you do not want to take off and on a ton of layers.

Your layers consist of :

1. Base Layer
2. Midlayer
3. External layer

Base layer should consist of a tight fitting thin layer. Moisture wick-ing is key here. Your sweat will turn cold . You will freeze . Thermal long johns are ideal.

Mid layer is what will insulate the body heat. Keep the expelled moisture warm. Fleece material is great.

External will be your thick riding jacket, with or without a liner; wind is your enemy.

You can wear Gore-Tex to keep wind and water out

Your hands and feet are no exception to these concepts. Glove liners and insulators are inexpensive and very productive. I use heated grips with glove liners and my cold riding gloves. You could also purchase heated gloves.


If you want to stay warm in extreme temperatures without the layers. It can become quiet expensive.

Sometimes you have to stay away from motorcycle branded gear.

Your best friend is coveralls.

150$ will buy you Duck coveralls from Carhartt. Those alone will keep you warm and dry.
70$ will buy you Walls duck coveralls just as good! You can wear your riding gear over or under as well without looking like a dork.
20$ Bilt warm gloves.
10$ Riding glove heat liners
10-50$ will buy a good balaclava . This will work wonders on you face and neck.

Wool insulated socks are a must , depending on your boots. You can also use toe warmers . 5$ can buy 6 pairs. They will keep your toes warm below 20 degrees.

Key points.

Full face helmet ( Make sure it fits right; especially with a balaclava)
Balaclava
Gloves and Glove insulators
Layers or Coveralls ( coveralls are the best option)
Warm socks (wool is great)

Wind and water are the enemy. Hands, feet and head are easily affected and can take longer to warm up.

Heated grips are great if you have 100$ for the oxfords

Keep some things under your seat for emergencies. Like a fold-able emergency heat blanket. Hand warmers and toe warms. A cell phone is a must so if your a weenie you can call your wife :p

If you find yourself to far into a ride and freezing stop and warm up, you can insulate yourself with paper towels and newspaper.

I speak from experience.
Ride safe and stay warm.
Its snowing outside and im going to ride into town and get some hot chocolate !
 

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By all means offer advice on staying warm, but in my opinion, a bike would be the last resort (after crawling) as a mode of transport whenever there is the prospect of ice or snow. This is not because I hate being cold, it's just common sense on two wheels. Staying upright on icy tarmac/asphalt demands more luck than skill and I couldn't care less what other people think of my 'skills', so why bother?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
By all means offer advice on staying warm, but in my opinion, a bike would be the last resort (after crawling) as a mode of transport whenever there is the prospect of ice or snow. This is not because I hate being cold, it's just common sense on two wheels. Staying upright on icy tarmac/asphalt demands more luck than skill and I couldn't care less what other people think of my 'skills', so why bother?
I love riding in snow. Its actually when I have the most fun, snow and sunshine are the best. But maybe because of where I am from. But I could careless of the weather. I commute 4 hours round trip on my bike most days. I would never consider driving my truck to work .
 

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This post is intended to persuade people to extend their riding season.
Please note:

Temperatures below 32 F can result in freezing roads. Salt and additives can result in damage to your fairings. Do not ride above your skill level and take special precautions in cold weather.
The real damage potential from winter road salt isn't to the plastic fairings, but rather corrosion of the various metal surfaces, especially to those which are unpainted or uncoated. And corrosion at electrical connectors, particularly frame/ground wire connections, is always a big issue for bikes being ridden on winter roads.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The real damage potential from winter road salt isn't to the plastic fairings, but rather corrosion of the various metal surfaces, especially to those which are unpainted or uncoated. And corrosion at electrical connectors, particularly frame/ground wire connections, is always a big issue for bikes being ridden on winter roads.
What is the name of that product used to protect against the corrosion ?
 

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I love riding in snow.......
On knobbly tyres, surely? I thought you were suggesting riding the CBR3 on snow, with road tyres!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
On knobbly tyres, surely? I thought you were suggesting riding the CBR3 on snow, with road tyres!
Honestly, I ride my cbr250 through snow all the time... I road 2 hours through a snow storm the other day,

I kind of just put my feet down like skiis and have fun. And I do it on street tires. Is it smart ? no. but it is fun. aha
 

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Heated Apparel

I was wondering if any of my fellow CBR riders have used or are using heated vest when riding? Especially those from the colder climes.
What effect has it had on your battery and charging systems?
I use Oxford sport grips which are great but wanted to add a heated vest as well.
Trouble with old body on those long cold winter commutes.
Any other info like if its possible to combine the two items would be of use.
:nerd:
 

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I was wondering if any of my fellow CBR riders have used or are using heated vest when riding? Especially those from the colder climes.
What effect has it had on your battery and charging systems?
I use Oxford sport grips which are great but wanted to add a heated vest as well.
Trouble with old body on those long cold winter commutes.
Any other info like if its possible to combine the two items would be of use.
:nerd:
Hi autopilot. I'm using Firstgear heated gloves (2 x 15w), Jacket (90w) and socks (2x 11w). I've also installed the voltmeter to monitor the alternator output while I'm riding. The alternator output is 350w max (I believe at peek torque rpm). I can keep the gear on full ON position when I'm on the way. On stop lights I have to reduce the jacket heat to 1/3 due to voltage dropping below 13v (and being too warm). When the jacket is at 1/3 and gloves and socks on full, the voltage stays above 13.2V.
I hope this helps.
 

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Thanks for the info Windycity. I will do the conversion to amps as this is how stuff is rated in the UK.
Ride safe and warm.
 

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I use heated jacket liner. I would say no to the vest, had one wasn't as warm as long sleeve. The long sleeve heat will help keep your hands warm. The if you keep your core warm the rest of you will stay warmer too. Remember that your body tries to keep the core warm so when it is cold your limbs gets less heat to keep the core warm but if you keep the core warm then the limbs will get more heat.

Currently my heated liner is a Gerbing. I got when they were still the original Gerbing Co. by the Gerbing family. Now it is owned by a investment firm and the service has gone to ****. They originally had lifetime warranty but now is only a year. I had to argue with them on the phone for them to warranty a switch that was less then a year old, sent them a copy of the receipt with the switch. Where as before when still family owned I contacted them cause I need a switch replaced but was in a crunch for time cause I was going on a road trip. They sent me a new one even before they received the old one. The Gerbing family is back in the business now they are called Gordon's.
 

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Knit one, purl two...

Have just been scouring the weather forecasts as you do when your a biker with a wkd looming. Ive got a wedding on about 120kms away and would rather stash the glad rags on the back and take the bike over the car.
Gotta make the most of the weather while it holds.

How are you folk getting on up in the Northern reaches, particularly Canada. Are you managing to get your bikes out yet? I know some of you have brand new machines to bust out!
 

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So, today I decided to commute to work, since the weather in the afternoon suppose to be +10C. However, when I left the house the temperature was -3C, and let me tell you that by the end of my 20 km ride, I could barely feel my fingers. :D Next time I'm throwing my nylon snowboarding undergloves! I never had my hands freeze so badly and I rode for much longer at +3C few times - my gloves were sufficient. :)

How do you guys keep your hands warm at these kind of temperatures besides installing heated grips?

PS My Rukka Airvision pants performed flawlessly - my butt and legs were warm all the way, great insulated insert!
 

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I have to be honest and say I dont ride in minus temps, you're tougher than me! :D
 

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So, today I decided to commute to work, since the weather in the afternoon suppose to be +10C. However, when I left the house the temperature was -3C, and let me tell you that by the end of my 20 km ride, I could barely feel my fingers. :D Next time I'm throwing my nylon snowboarding undergloves! I never had my hands freeze so badly and I rode for much longer at +3C few times - my gloves were sufficient. :)

How do you guys keep your hands warm at these kind of temperatures besides installing heated grips?

PS My Rukka Airvision pants performed flawlessly - my butt and legs were warm all the way, great insulated insert!
I've worn my Hestra Heli gloves (top shelf ski gloves) on occasion for cold +35F morning rides, although I tend towards riding mainly in fair weather temps for the most part. +40F is my low temp threshold... +60F to +75F are ideal temps in my book.

If I rode my bike regularly in the kind of low temps you're talking about, I'm sure I'd spend the money for some good quality heated grips (with a High/Low heat setting). Consider the fact that you're talking about similar cold temps that snowmobilers ride in, and heated grips have been standard equipment on snowmobiles for the past several decades.
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I also have these like elbow sleeves that go over my handle baRS and I just need light gloves with the heated grips they are ugly but amazing . Bought then on amazon lol
 

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What is the name of that product used to protect against the corrosion ?
acf-50 is used alot in the UK and supposed to be very good.
 

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I've worn my Hestra Heli gloves (top shelf ski gloves) on occasion for cold +35F morning rides, although I tend towards riding mainly in fair weather temps for the most part. +40F is my low temp threshold... +60F to +75F are ideal temps in my book.

If I rode my bike regularly in the kind of low temps you're talking about, I'm sure I'd spend the money for some good quality heated grips (with a High/Low heat setting). Consider the fact that you're talking about similar cold temps that snowmobilers ride in, and heated grips have been standard equipment on snowmobiles for the past several decades.
When I was commuting to London (work) on my bike in the winter months way back when. I used to use these things, not actual make but very similar and kept hands warm:
Black Digit Motorcycle Handle Bar Mitts Hand Warmer Motorbike Bar Muffs Gloves | eBay
 

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I commute year round in Phoenix, USA, so keeping cool is a bigger issue than keeping warm for me. But when it is at its coldest (32F / 0C) in the dead of winter mornings, I've just put a waterproof golf jacket over top of my mesh summer jacket and packed it away for the ride home (60F / 16C). The complete lack of moisture in the air that time of year here means it feels a **** of a lot colder than that once the wind gets moving.

IMO its gloves that are a much bigger deal than the jacket. My hands froze solid on my FZ6 with mesh gloves before I got proper winter riding gloves.
 

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I commute year round in Phoenix, USA......IMO its gloves that are a much bigger deal than the jacket. My hands froze solid on my FZ6 with mesh gloves before I got proper winter riding gloves.
Agree. Also knees on anything that doesn't have a barn-door fairing. It's easier to deal with cold legs though. Back in the UK, I had an enormous, thickly-padded pair of riding trousers that looked ridiculous but worked rather well. Gloves are a different matter though, because by the time they've been padded enough to work well in winter, they're too thick to allow operation of throttle, brake, switches etc. Heated grips are probably the only solution if you ride a lot in very cold conditions, though I've never used them.
 
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