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I may be showing my 40 odd years of age here but one of the things I really like about the CBR300 is that it is not cluttered with the latest electronic gizmos, bells and whistles that seem to be the current flavor on new sports bikes.

Do we really need up to four different settings of traction control, fuel maps, ABS & suspension??
Then there's the LCD dash to distract your eyes off the road while you find out all manner of things from how many MPG's your getting to even a bank-angle indicator on the latest BMW S1000RR.

What happens I wonder when the bike is 10 years old and all that electronic finery starts to develop gremlins or packs up all together. You could easily end up stranded or very poor or both!

I see some members here noting that they would like to see a gear indicator as standard. Fair enough, it seems to be a popular feature these days (both the KTM RC390 & Yamaha R3 have one) but is it really necessary? Once you get to know your bike and engine all you should need is an neutral indicator to stop you letting out the clutch inadvertently whilst still in gear.

When I first started riding bikes all you had was two dials, one for revs, one for speed and two little lights for neutral and high beam. We survived!

Would be interested to hear others thoughts.... :cool:
 

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I agree... there's a lot to be said for simplicity in a motorcycle.

The CBR250R is the first bike I've owned with modern EFI, every other bike I've previously owned (and currently own) has a carburator to handle fuel delivery to the engine. As much as I like the ease of of turning the key and touching the start button to bring the engine to life on the 250R, if at some point there is a problem with the EFI system I know that it's not going to be an easy or simple fix... whereas with my carburated Honda XR's & CT70 if there is a problem with the fuel system, it's pretty easy to pull the carb apart and clean it.

As for all these newfangled electronic features now becoming commonplace on current bikes, I too can live without them. I don't even see the need for something like a digital gear indicator... for a new rider, it's not difficult to count your shifts in order to know what gear the transmission is in. In fact after you ride a particular bike for a time, you'll naturally get a feel for the relationship between the engine RPM and the bikes road speed, and just intuitively know what gear the transmission is in without even having to think about it. You could say that kind of intuitive knowledge (what gear the bike is in) is one of those 'Zen' aspects of motorcycling... becoming one with the bike.

From a practical standpoint, all of these extra digital displays and lights on the dash panel are in a very real sense unnecessary things that can distract the motorcycle operator's attention from what should be their primary point of focus... the road ahead.
 

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I personally prefer these new digital dash. if I forget something mostly everything I need displayed in an easily readable design so I can get back to focusing on the road quickly. Huge fan of the Ducati 1199 Dashboard & that it shows what gear your currently in. unlike cars you just can't look down & see. Though a gear indicator isn't necessary at all since you have the RPMs displayed but what the ****, I wanna see what gear I'm in XD .
 

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I definitely want to keep the analogue rpm meter. Don't go digital all the way. I fly planes too and always rely on the old steam valves (Basic instruments) Once the glass cockpit fails its not much fun! And don't worry what gear you are in, ride the bike and hear it, feel it, like you stole it :)
 

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I definitely want to keep the analogue rpm meter. Don't go digital all the way. I fly planes too and always rely on the old steam valves (Basic instruments) Once the glass cockpit fails its not much fun! And don't worry what gear you are in, ride the bike and hear it, feel it, like you stole it :)
x2, always was a fan of analog RPM gauges, i'll stick with them till the day comes that i have to settle for something all digital.
 

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I have a Moose Off Road Digital Tachometer/Hour Meter on my '01 XR400R, mainly for the hour meter function in order to keep track of oil change intervals. It shows total elapsed hours when the engine is off. The tachometer function runs whenever the engine is running, and although I never look at it while I'm riding, it's nice to have when making carb adjustments such as idle speed and low speed air screw adjustments.

Here the meter is in the hour function.
DSC_0082.JPG


Pick-up wire wraps around the spark plug high tension wire.
DSC_0084.JPG


I made this aluminum mounting bracket, which is attached to the back side of the enduro trip meter using velcro.
DSC_0089.JPG
 

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I'm all for simplicity. I'm too slow to catch on with the high-tech gizmos, haha.
 

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I bought the CBR300 for the very reason of simplicity. I was looking for a modern minimalist bike and besides the fairing the CBR is just that...oops, just remembered that decadent fuel gauge.
 

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unfortunately, my experience with carbs was not one of simplicity. I loved everything about my previous bike, except those finicky carbs. I'm a lot happier with fuel injection. I just want to push the button and have the bike fire up in cold weather.

Oh well. To each his own...
 

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gear change indicator lights are not only unnecessary,
but must interfere with natural learning, including gears..
removing vision from the road ahead
as you go thru the gears, is similar to,
closing your eyes at each gear change..
smashes and reaction times are
measured in microseconds..

natural unbroken forward awareness is also
part of the 'zen' aspect of motorcycling..
'zen' incidentally also means 'forward'..

zen simplicity may seem to be in the lights etc,
but is within the mind and awareness of the
mindful and the aware..
 

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keep it simple

yes keep it as simple as possible in a world that tends to want to raise the complexity level for just about everything, but sometimes I feel you do have to keep an open mind & surrender to more advanced technology if it increases functionality/safety, examples are disk brakes & efi

simplicity is one of the reasons I choose the cb300f, still breaking it in:

I just sold a single & I wanted a single to replace it & not a twin, 50mph & 5.5rpm is 6th gear on this bike, never had a shift counter so I do not miss it, so it has a fuel gauge & we'll see how that goes but trip a is for fuel & trip b is for chain maintenance, single headlight so nobody is constantly advising me I have a headlight out

I love efi vs carbs & I have had many of both

1st gear on this bike is not too bad I have seen worse for small displacement bikes,

the seat seems fine so far but we'll see, need to ride it more?

I am still evaluating the IRC tires so we'll see on this subject?

the exhaust I am still evaluating but the stock is quiet & for me personally that is one of the reasons I bought this bike, we'll see about the heat but that is a safety concern for me also however I do think a carbon fiber exhaust finish would work well for this bike

the only thing I see that is a must to mod is as usual the mirrors, I just prefer bar end mirrors

as part of the purchase deal I got the dealership to throw in the upgraded chain guard so I could evaluate the enhanced carbon fiber finish look, liked that so I came forward a little more & also upgraded the belly pan cowl to the upgraded carbon fiber finish, if I like that I'll do the front panels

ride safe
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Nice write up, would be great to see a pic of your bike with the carbon parts on it.

I'm with you on the EFI vs carbs. Its great not having to muck around with chokes etc these days. Poor idling bikes seem to be a thing of the past.

Yep, a bar end mirror is the way to go and i think you will find the seat pretty agreeable. This would be one of the more comfy seats Ive had. Ive done a couple of 400mile days on it.
I decided to stick with the IRC's until worn out as they are adequate for most riding situations but I'm looking forward to doing an evaluation of some radials next time round.

Enjoy your new ride.
 

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agree on f/i over carbs, but see f/i as the simple version..
no choke, no petrol petcock, no needles and jets to clean etc..

first cbr250r looked to be 'missing something' with no kick starter..
but after a while of starting first touch of the starter button
every time, incl cold dark morning starts,, fond memories of
kickstarting cbr750/4's and others, faded away..

i take no notice of dash lights, or fuel gauge, when riding..
fuel gauge flashing [rare event] is enough to catch attention
thru peripheral vision, as is analogue tacho..
only check speedo in specific [speed trap] radar areas..

oil/filter change is a piece of cake, as is chain maintenance..
spark plug seems to need no basic maintenance [!]
no synchronising four carbs or tuning for 4 into 0 exhaust [etc]..

this motorcycle does have that principle of zen simplicity,
not only in design but in reliability, which is a sort of character
in motorcycles [when they have it], and dependability,
which is simply the only way to go...
 

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Re:Technology VS Simplicity

Technology helps us to make things simple.
I like to go with technology its fast its accurate its the new tomorrow. One can not believe what he can do today via pressing some keys on the key board, imagine a world where you can master the machine by your thinking only. Technology is always the new upfront and will always be.
 

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People call me a Luddite, but you take the cake!

I spent two months this fall driving a forty year old car as a daily driver and put a couple thousand miles on it.

They don't build them like they used to, and sometimes, that's a good thing.

I'll gladly trade a carb to get fuel injection. Molded seats are so much more comfortable. A three speed transmission without synchromesh? I'll pass thanks. Manual steering with drum brakes? No thank you.

Look at the maintenance routine of venerable Super Cub.

Honda recommended daily checks of the lights, horn, tire pressure, brakes, fuel and oil level, and a weekly check of the battery electrolyte level. The new engine break in maintenance was done at 320 kilometres (200 mi), requiring adjustment of the valve tappets and contact breaker points, and an oil change, and the rider was advised to stay under 48 kilometres per hour (30 mph) for the first 800 kilometres (500 mi). Every 1,600 kilometres (1,000 mi) the spark plug needed cleaning, and the chain adjustment checked, and every 3,200 kilometres (2,000 mi) an oil change, breaker point check, and valve adjustment was due. At 8,000 kilometres (5,000 mi), major maintenance was due, requiring the removal and cleaning of the carburetor, drive chain, exhaust silencer, and wheel bearings.

I'll pass thanks.

I'll admit that older vehicles have a certain style, aura and mystic about them. In fact I love that. But new vehicles simply can't be beat for their reliability, performance and build quality.
 

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Gear indicators have been around a while. My 1987 BMW K75 had one. It was even an LCD! It also had a cable gizmo that would retract the side stand when you pulled the clutch. Those zany Germans. I would like an indicator for top gear. It seems to want a 7th gear. The little tree-hunner is the most fun bike I've owned so far.
 

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I do like a gear indicator. It shouldn't cost too much to equip 3 to 5 LEDS on the dash.
Gear indicator is less of an issue with 4 speed geared bikes, but with a 6 speed, you could find yourself 1 or 2 gears under or over what you thought you where.

With 3 leds you can have 6 possible outcomes, and show each gear,

1 0 0 (1st gear)
0 1 0 (2nd gear)
0 0 1 (3rd gear)
1 1 0 (4th gear)
1 0 1 (5th gear)
1 1 1 (6th gear).

Or just one LED light up when in 2nd, 4th, and 6th gear.


I don't mind as much electronic gizmos that when they break don't affect the performance of the bike.
I think a big fear of all was at the beginning when FI came out, what to do when FI failed, or the 'jets clogged'.
And true, when a fuel injection fails, it's a costly thing to replace compared to a carburetor, unless you can find the parts.
 
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