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Was adjusting my chain for the first time as it was about 55mm (recommended is 25-30mm), and after finishing it up I'm pretty sure the real wheel alignment is off despite it looking correct according to my indicators. When I ride the bike (only got it up to about 30mph), there is a dragging/clicking noise from the chain and it just handles differently. I've attached photos of both sides of the indicator and what my manual says (which is very confusing..step 6 in photo). Would appreciate some help so I can get it back to normal, and if I can't...does any auto shop do motorcycles also or would I have to go to do the dealer?
Thanks!

 

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I believe you're looking at different reference lines on each side, not the same on each side. I'd recommend loosening again, getting a good reference as to how the markings look. Count back from the front of the adjusters. Maybe even mark with a felt marker the 3rd or 4th slot on each side so you know your still seeing the same marks when they're back in the adjusting slots. All you're trying to do is match the number of notches whether that's 3,4,5... whatever it is, on both sides. It looks like the side you can see that arrow (the right side) is too tight. If you count notches and realign, I believe that'll do you. You've done nothing wrong that can't be corrected. I always leave my chain on the loose side. It works better than when it's too tight, and you'll get much better wear from chain and sprockets. All's well.
 

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2017 Honda CB300FAH (ABS)
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This is a good buy, as the marks on the arm aren't too reliable: Motion Pro Chain Alignment Tool - RevZilla
That was the first thought that came to my mind when seeing the thread. While you're at it, you could also pick up a Motion Pro SlackSetter Pro - a cool little tool for measuring chain slack

A little off-topic, but other motorcycle-specific tools to round out one's box are: a Motion Pro 08-0029 Shock Spanner Wrench for setting the rear shock tension (temporarily unbolting the left front foot peg gives one better access); an inexpensive rear wheel paddle lift stand like the Venom sold on Amazon; and a chain brush. I think that pretty much rounds out specialty tools needed for basic maintenance on these bikes. (If you're adjusting your own chain, I'm guessing you already have at least the stand and the brush :).) Good luck.
 

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If your ever in any doubt then measure the distance between the centre of the swing arm pivot point and the centre of the rear axle on both sides. Easier done with two people. These are the two measurements that need to be the same. All the wishy washy markings on the swing arm etc will just lead to inaccuracies and get you confused. 😁
 

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You can probably fix it yourself, you got alot of good advice from the other guys. If it was me I would put it up on the paddock stand and then use 2 people to measure like KiwiRider said. That is very straight-forward solution using a metric ruler.

But forget about Honda official dealer, if you want to have a mechanic do it then just go to an Independent motorcycle mechanic. I got charged $15 by my mechanic to do this job. I could have just done it at home myself but I brought the bike in to get the handlebars changed (bike had been in a minor wreck before I bought it) so just paid same mechanic $15 more bucks to do the chain adjustment. I mean my bike was already at the shop so I figured may as well get it done.
 

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A chain alignment tool is quite cheap and takes all the guesswork out of chain tensioning.
34668
 

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A chain alignment tool is quite cheap and takes all the guesswork out of chain tensioning. View attachment 34668
Yeah I was a bit perturbed my mechanic did not use such tool when he charged me the 15 dollars. He didnt even use a ruler or anything. Just a wrench, turning both nuts the same amount. Oh, well. I guess if you have done it hundreds of times you dont need the tools. But next time I am going to do it at home by myself.
 

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Even after you have turned both nuts the same amount (hopefully) it is well worth checking with an alignment guide.
 
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