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Hey guys, I'm Tina, 22 living in the suburbs of New York.

Lil about me, I've been a lifeguard for about 5 years, and a dedicated swim instructor for children once beach season is over.
My purpose here is to learn all I can about the CBR 300 before I buy one, and ride it to and from the beach.

I have no experience with motorcycles, so feel free to educate me, I am all ears.
I'm hoping that joining this forum I'll have all my questions answered, and maybe in a few years I'll have something to add of my own!

But seriously, tell me everything about owning, riding, and taking care of your bikes, I'd love to hear different perspectives!
 

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Welcome from New Zealand Tina :)
Heck ask us an easy question why dont ya! Where to start...

Treat other traffic as the enemy that wants to kill you and this will hold you in good stead. Expect the unexpected from every car around you and develop eyes in the back of your head!

There's loads of info on line about how to ride a bike. One of the biggest mistakes I see of learner riders is they are too stiff. Naturally because they are nervous and riding cautiously. Moving at one with your machine is a fluid movement that you need to be relaxed to do effectively and enjoyably. You arms and hands in particular need to be relaxed at the bars and controls. Stiff and awkward movements will be replicated by an erratic riding style.

I'm sure some of the other members will chime in with some tips of their own. Enjoy your riding.
 

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Welcome from New Zealand Tina :)
Heck ask us an easy question why dont ya! Where to start...

Treat other traffic as the enemy that wants to kill you and this will hold you in good stead. Expect the unexpected from every car around you and develop eyes in the back of your head!

There's loads of info on line about how to ride a bike. One of the biggest mistakes I see of learner riders is they are too stiff. Naturally because they are nervous and riding cautiously. Moving at one with your machine is a fluid movement that you need to be relaxed to do effectively and enjoyably. You arms and hands in particular need to be relaxed at the bars and controls. Stiff and awkward movements will be replicated by an erratic riding style.

I'm sure some of the other members will chime in with some tips of their own. Enjoy your riding.
Hi, thanks for the welcome!

Wow, driving sounds like gaining a 6th sense. I'm sure when the weather changes as well, you'd gain more awareness skills. Have you ever driven in traffic while riding in the snow? I'm not that knowledgeable in the weather in New Zealand, but in NY snow can come out of nowhere, and I feel like I might be on the road when it starts snowing.

And is it frowned upon to take the bike out when its raining? I can imagine that really bad weather like snow or heavy rain will be horrible for the engine, but what if you have to drive through it to get home?
 

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Hi, thanks for the welcome!

Wow, driving sounds like gaining a 6th sense. I'm sure when the weather changes as well, you'd gain more awareness skills. Have you ever driven in traffic while riding in the snow? I'm not that knowledgeable in the weather in New Zealand, but in NY snow can come out of nowhere, and I feel like I might be on the road when it starts snowing.

And is it frowned upon to take the bike out when its raining? I can imagine that really bad weather like snow or heavy rain will be horrible for the engine, but what if you have to drive through it to get home?
And I just read a few more posts, turns out my bike will go nowhere during the winter.
Makes sense, although I just wish I lived in a warmer place...
 

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And I just read a few more posts, turns out my bike will go nowhere during the winter.
Makes sense, although I just wish I lived in a warmer place...
Ha! Me too. Sounds like we probably live in a similar climate as I'm from the deep South of NZ which is the coldest part.
I'm a pretty keen motorcyclist (recreational only, no commuting) so it takes a fair bit to keep my bike in the shed on a weekend. July is our coldest month and I dont tend to ride at all then but any half decent sunny day I will wrap up and get out there. Good gear is important in winter. If you continue to ride for a number of years you will find you acquire quite a wardrobe of riding gear. Summer jackets and winter jackets, same with gloves etc. Thin summer gloves give better feel at the controls than bulky winter ones.
Yeah riding on snow and ice is def not recommended lol! It's bad enough on four wheels in a car let alone when you only have two. Riding in the rain is OK though, wont damage the bike, they designed to handle it. Just not a lot of fun.
What made you decide on the CBR300 as your first bike?
 

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Welcome to the forum. Just ride as much as you can but remember ALL car drivers, cyclists, pedestrians, dogs and cats are out to get you so keep a very sharp eye on them. A good book to read is 'Ride Hard, Ride Smart' by Pat Hahn. It's a US publication so should be easy enough to get a copy. It gives you an insight of what to look out for and how to ride in a defensive way. Also worth looking at online is 'Survival Skills UK' by Keith Williams. That is what will keep you safer, not loud pipes. Consider HiViz clothing too. If you do get a CBR300 it will pay you to put a 15 tooth sprocket on the ront instead of the 14T. Makes the bike much less snatchy.
Have fun anyway.
 

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Welcome Tina,
My experience is (and has been for 43 years) is that riding is awesome!!! What Grommit says is absolutely true. Everything is out to get you, but you learn to recognize situations the more you ride.

I’ve been a canyon racer, cross country rider, and used a bike on my farm... loved it all.... even hours of standing on my back pegs going across West Texas because I was trying to eat miles and my butt was sore beyond belief.

About the only advice I can offer is to stay comfortable being you. My worst wrecks came from me being pushed by others. My comfort level has changed too. I rode with a canyon racing group about 15 years ago, and showed up at the restaurant a half hour after everyone else. I was ok with that and still am.

As for the bike.... I love my CBR300R!! Very responsive.... decent acceleration, and pretty comfortable. We pull ours on a trailer behind a motor home and my wife and I two up with no problems... and if we are staying someplace fun ( like Western South Dakota), I can sneak out and recapture my youth for a bit.... and come back smiling....

You can’t go wrong with this bike..... and you get to cuss a bit during oil changes..... 😁
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ha! Me too. Sounds like we probably live in a similar climate as I'm from the deep South of NZ which is the coldest part.
I'm a pretty keen motorcyclist (recreational only, no commuting) so it takes a fair bit to keep my bike in the shed on a weekend. July is our coldest month and I dont tend to ride at all then but any half decent sunny day I will wrap up and get out there. Good gear is important in winter. If you continue to ride for a number of years you will find you acquire quite a wardrobe of riding gear. Summer jackets and winter jackets, same with gloves etc. Thin summer gloves give better feel at the controls than bulky winter ones.
Yeah riding on snow and ice is def not recommended lol! It's bad enough on four wheels in a car let alone when you only have two. Riding in the rain is OK though, wont damage the bike, they designed to handle it. Just not a lot of fun.
What made you decide on the CBR300 as your first bike?
Ah, so you're used to the cold. In NY, its usually cold from November-February, so I won't be doing a lot of ridding then. But during the summer time, which is now, I know i'll be riding my bike a lot more to make up for those lost winter days!
How is riding your bike without a jacket or with shorts? There are a lot of riders that I see on the highway with just their tank tops on, but I always wonder how the wind feels...

As for the CBR, im not into flashy bikes, or going super fast, I'm just looking for a comfortable and dependable ride, and my cousin, along with a few of my coworkers recommended I start with the CBR. I also got my eye on the kawasaki ninja 300 or a suzuki, but I heard they were more like sports bikes.
 

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Let me chime in so you'll know there are more of us out here. Kiwi's too bashful to say it.. but he's our Official...greeter, technical adviser and all around spiritual Guru. :rolleyes: Welcome to the Forum. Ride Safe and Enjoy.
haha thanks, and I've noticed! After reading a few posts here and there, Kiwi always pops up :)
 

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Welcome Tina,
My experience is (and has been for 43 years) is that riding is awesome!!! What Grommit says is absolutely true. Everything is out to get you, but you learn to recognize situations the more you ride.

I’ve been a canyon racer, cross country rider, and used a bike on my farm... loved it all.... even hours of standing on my back pegs going across West Texas because I was trying to eat miles and my butt was sore beyond belief.

About the only advice I can offer is to stay comfortable being you. My worst wrecks came from me being pushed by others. My comfort level has changed too. I rode with a canyon racing group about 15 years ago, and showed up at the restaurant a half hour after everyone else. I was ok with that and still am.

As for the bike.... I love my CBR300R!! Very responsive.... decent acceleration, and pretty comfortable. We pull ours on a trailer behind a motor home and my wife and I two up with no problems... and if we are staying someplace fun ( like Western South Dakota), I can sneak out and recapture my youth for a bit.... and come back smiling....

You can’t go wrong with this bike..... and you get to cuss a bit during oil changes..... 😁
Wow reading all this is making me excited!
I see that patience is key when it comes to sharing the road with other drivers and pedestrians. Theres lots of deers, and smaller animals that LOVE to just jump in the road where I live, so I'll be sure to be careful when I ride.
What's you favorite terrain to ride on? There's not a lot of flat roads in NY, lots of hills and turns, but it makes me wonder if the roads were flatter, would it be more easy to drive on?
 

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How is riding your bike without a jacket or with shorts? There are a lot of riders that I see on the highway with just their tank tops on, but I always wonder how the wind feels...

As for the CBR, im not into flashy bikes, or going super fast, I'm just looking for a comfortable and dependable ride, and my cousin, along with a few of my coworkers recommended I start with the CBR. I also got my eye on the kawasaki ninja 300 or a suzuki, but I heard they were more like sports bikes.
I've had a few spills over the years (when I was younger) without the right gear on. Road rash is very painful, takes a long time to heal and has a tendency to get infected. So these days I keep myself covered.

Your cousin and co-workers steered you in the right direction! I cant think of a better bike to learn on. I ride a NInja 400 these days but I think the CBR is a better bet for first bike.
 

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ATGATT. - All the Gear All The Time. You don't normally get to choose when you will have an 'off' so always be prepared. Many accidents occur when you ' just pop down to the shop'. and haven't put on the correct gear.
Hondas are one of the most reliable and well made bikes.
 
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