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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering how much you other riders wind up the engine. For example when upshifting from 3rd gear to 4th gear do you do it before reaching 5000 rpm?

That is the way that I have been driving. Usually upshifting at between 4000 - 5000 rpm. I use my ears as a guide of when to upshift and according to my ears the engine sounds like it is being over-burdened at higher than 5000 rpm.

But I must be doing something right because I am averaging 70 mpg with 40% highway riding.
 

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A dyno chart I saw shows max torque at 6600 rpm, max hp at 8400 rpm.
In my opinion spinning it up a little more, and using more throttle, is not detrimental to the engine.
And more fun. :)
 

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for those not yet able to ride by ear or feel etc, easy and effective rpm is around 6, with needle at easy to read 12 o'clock position..
obviously road slope and load factors will vary together with speed limits [thinking school zones etc] so revs also vary for smooth riding..
on long straight runs tho you can find that sweet spot rpm for different bikes and conditions.. even small throttle movements count..
6 gets you into good torque zone and allows for easy pickup after changing up, also allows good smooth engine braking downshifting..
 

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5k is fine. I shift into 6th at 38-40 mph unless merging on 65 mph road which is twice a year to put the bike away for winter in parents' garage.

Occasionally I'll rip 6k shifts to have some fun. 9k blasts for a gear or two on certain days.
 

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In the daily commute I usually gear up at 5K, it's a relaxed driving. But when I have a long strip to accelerate like joining the highway, of course I go up in the rpm.

When in the mountain roads I keep the engine "happy and awake", usually in the range of 6-7K and gearing up at around 8500-9K.

In the first day of the Big Bike course at Honda Riding Park (where we used CB300R and CBR300R for the training), learning how to accelerate fast and safe, the instructor said: "this is a big bike, you're no more riding a Wave or the grandma's scooter, push that f*cking engine up!" - in fact, they teach us to learn how to push until just before the injection cutoff.
 

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I think feel is a big part of it. When I’m pushing her hard, I can feel myself coming out of the powerband because the bike accelerates slower....time to shift. With the CBR, I feel it just a smidge before redline.

If you are puttering around (or following your wife’s scooter), I would say 5k is good :D
 

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I'm good at 5k--6k if I'm in a hurry- can't see going over 7k- between 7k and 8k there is only 2hp to gain-I feel the meat of the power band is 5-7k and I stay there
 

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Generally around the 5K mark. I have 15T front sprocket which is perfect for all my riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do you think upshifting at 6000 rpm would cause a significant decrease in fuel economy as compared to 5000 rpm upshifts?

In my opinion the engine is making alot of noise at 6000 rpm. It is my "gut feeling" that the engine does not sound happy at 6000 rpm (In 4th gear for example).

My previous bike was a Ninja 250, so keep that in mind that this CB300F is actually the highest cc bike I have ever owned. So I think maybe the guys that have been riding bigger displacement bikes in the past have grown accustomed to different shift points.
 

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long summary of main factors,, nothing new];
every bike is different, between brands and models, local conditions such as gearing, tyres/pressures, road conditions, rider positioning and weight plus loading such as rider/pillion weight.. and whether youre in a hurry or keeping up with traffic or reducing due to speed reductions or other speed factors such as in the wet etc..
of course individuals vary in experience and attitude including to overtakes and road positioning within traffic flows etc..
yet the bike will generate power differently thru its rev range and gears.. basically tho it has a rev limiter/cutoff, so you can still rev it within factory limited revs.. but higher revs in lower gears will burn more fuel, thus cost more to run..

i dont worry about fuel other than not deliberately wasting it or if low on fuel between fuel outlets etc..


like to get off the line smartly when waiting at the front after filtering simply to get into clear space safely and away from whatever is behind the wheel alongside me.. [think distracted, incompetent, psychos etc]..
couple of times a car has attempted to take my space after lights and feeding into a single lane, when little option than gunning it,, ie, to rev limiter [in first] flat changing to second...
so aside from habits and riding to conditions [wet etc], it comes down to personal preferences and priorities..
most would agree that engines have 'sweet spots' and best revs for performance and/or economy.. generally tho novices might avoid excess' such as habitual very high or low revs, for typical rides...


everything, is designed to interact for basic performance tho, so hondas experiences as foremost engine builder have gone into your bikes ability to perform in various situations.. in my experience they 'prefer' higher over very low rpm generally,, given smooth clutching and throttle control.. [dumping clutch from higher revs is 'better' imo than dumping it at low revs for gear...
still recommend about 6 for those still learning their skills, mainly because its not under revving and the needle is within your lower peripheral vision - ie, no need to take attention from the road ahead to know its about 6.. [thus practice, your peripheral awareness]

for those riding for best possible fuel economy, thats a different game
as is virtually racing on the roads.. best left to experienced riders..
smoothness in everything is still the or a key to riding skill...
 

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...When I’m pushing her hard, I can feel myself coming out of the powerband because the bike accelerates slower....time to shift. With the CBR, I feel it just a smidge before redline.
I did a couple of track days on my CBR and found that there was little point pushing much past 9 - 9.5K rpm as it was just more noise and less boost. Such is the character of the single cylinder engine.

...most would agree that engines have 'sweet spots' and best revs for performance and/or economy..
True. I found my bikes sweet spot was between 5 and 6K rpm. By the time I got to 6.5K rpm some harsh vibration was setting in. The taller gearing I ran meant I could cruise in the sweet spot at a reasonable clip.
Interestingly the CBR250R I had previously never had the harsh vibration patch and was much freeer revving. But then all engines come with their own individuality, like their owners :D
 

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I did a couple of track days on my CBR and found that there was little point pushing much past 9 - 9.5K rpm as it was just more noise and less boost. Such is the character of the single cylinder engine.
Good call Kiwi... this is from a 2015 CBR300R. Looks like it’s 8500-9000

 

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Copy pasta from the manual

Recommended Shift Points Shifting Up From 1st to 2nd 12 mph (20 km/h) From 2nd to 3rd 19 mph (30 km/h) From 3rd to 4th 25 mph (40 km/h) From 4th to 5th 31 mph (50 km/h) From 5th to 6th 37 mph (60 km/h)
Shifting Down From 6th to 5th 28 mph (45 km/h) From 5th to 4th 22 mph (35 km/h) From 4th to 3rd 16 mph (25 km/h)

I know my engine likely wont last as long as those who have posted before me but I am constantly revving up the little motor and running high rpms to stay in the power band. I just love the sound of the motorcycle at higher rpms. I bought my motorcycle new and I'm at 4700 miles with an upcoming 2-3k mile trip in the next two weeks. I have had no issues sitting at 8k rpms for 3-4 hours straight (except some stretch breaks) on the highway and my last trip included "sessions" of me pushing redline between 3rd/4th gear on a road I found extremely fun and would ride one way then back the other way multiple times. I'm all for taking care of the things I own which is why I change my oil more frequently than the manual requires (i think we all do) but when I ride I treat my motorcycle throttle like a rental.

I finally got an apartment with a garage so I can service my motorcycle myself and give it make up kisses for how I treat it when I'm on the saddle.
 

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bear in mind recommended shifting at mph is just a guide..
for novices etc at least its something to start with, before personal habits based on familiarity begin.. other than particular speed zones [eg hospital, school] including speed cameras i ride by feel with secondary interest in rpm..
its common sense to change oil more frequently when stressing engine such as prolonged high speed runs - or regular short runs..
common sense is a good standby fr motorcyclists..
 

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Some tips that I have realized about the cbr300r:

An easy way for you to tell what gear you're in is to go to 6-6.25k rpm then the number in the ten digit (mph) is what gear you're in. For 6th gear in the (higher revv range) an easy way to verify is to take your rpms and -.5 so around 8.0k rpms is 75 mph.

It also works in reverse (to remain in the meat of the torque curve) so if the speed limit is 30 I would be in 3rd, 45 mph would be 4th, etc.

I think it's bad habit to be going too slow for the gear you're in. Ever since I realized what I wrote above I've had less moments of not knowing what gear I was in, better braking (down shifting less), and more confidence (dare I also say control) during corners. Yes some of these progressed because I was more experienced as a rider but at any moment (as long as you're near 6k rpms) a quick blimp of the throttle and you know for sure.


Each riders goals are different and for me I'm willing to run my engine harder for a riding style that I feel safest executing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Some tips that I have realized about the cbr300r:

An easy way for you to tell what gear you're in is to go to 6-6.25k rpm then the number in the ten digit (mph) is what gear you're in. For 6th gear in the (higher revv range) an easy way to verify is to take your rpms and -.5 so around 8.0k rpms is 75 mph.

It also works in reverse (to remain in the meat of the torque curve) so if the speed limit is 30 I would be in 3rd, 45 mph would be 4th, etc.

I think it's bad habit to be going too slow for the gear you're in. Ever since I realized what I wrote above I've had less moments of not knowing what gear I was in, better braking (down shifting less), and more confidence (dare I also say control) during corners. Yes some of these progressed because I was more experienced as a rider but at any moment (as long as you're near 6k rpms) a quick blimp of the throttle and you know for sure.


Each riders goals are different and for me I'm willing to run my engine harder for a riding style that I feel safest executing.
Thank you for these math calculations. I am going to give that a shot. Up to now I had been relying on "45 at 5" to tell me if i was in top gear. 45 mph at 5000 rpm I mean.

I am ashamed to admit that after almost 1 year of ownership that I still sometimes pull the clutch and attempt to upshift and find that I am already in 6th gear (mostly on the entrance ramp of the highway) . I would ask the others how many years of riding until a person stops making that mistake? I mean the mistake of thinking they are in 5th gear when they are already in 6th gear.
 

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... I would ask the others how many years of riding until a person stops making that mistake? I mean the mistake of thinking they are in 5th gear when they are already in 6th gear.
Often on the CBR, remember I used to rabbit on about the bike needing a 7 speed box :)
The Ninja has a gear position indicator and it is handy to glance at to check your in ‘top’. I was guilty of poo pooing these in the past. :eek:
 

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I would ask the others how many years of riding until a person stops making that mistake? I mean the mistake of thinking they are in 5th gear when they are already in 6th gear.


Ever since I realized what I wrote above I've had less moments of not knowing what gear I was in.
A gear indicator is like $20 and installation takes 15 minutes...
 
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