Honda CBR 300 Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,455 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw in a thread someone mentioned about warming their bike up for 30 seconds before riding it. Would be curious to know how long you guys warm your engines at idle speed before riding?

Possibly I'm over cautious but I never ride away until the first bar shows on the temp gauge which takes about four to five minutes usually.
During this time I put my gear on. I don't commute tho and I guess if your late for work then this may be too long to wait?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,498 Posts
I never deliberately warm a car or bike up. I just set off, but keep the revs low till the engine has started to warm up. That's how I was taught. It is supposed to shorten the warm-up time. The sooner you get the oil up to temp, the better.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
It does take a lot of patience, but as you're doing already, it's smart to take care of other things while buying time to warm up the bike. I've become religious about it because I truly see and feel how the engine is more comfortable and free when it is properly warmed. 3 - 5 minute warm up is good, and I'm starting place more emphasis on this when the temps are colder outside.

At a minimum, I always give it at least a couple minutes of warm up when I'm in a hurry and short on time. If I do this, I ride even more conservatively for some time in the beginning.

Smaller motors and higher revving... Some warm up is definitely healthy, I feel.

I never deliberately warm a car or bike up. I just set off, but keep the revs low till the engine has started to warm up. That's how I was taught. It is supposed to shorten the warm-up time. The sooner you get the oil up to temp, the better.
I have read of this before, and I do agree with it... However, I don't trust my lack of patience with staying conservative in keeping the RPM's low for a longer period of time at the start. This method would take some additional discipline from me.

The bright side is that traffic lights can buy some stationary warm up time...
 
  • Like
Reactions: mikal

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
I saw in a thread someone mentioned about warming their bike up for 30 seconds before riding it. Would be curious to know how long you guys warm your engines at idle speed before riding?

Possibly I'm over cautious but I never ride away until the first bar shows on the temp gauge which takes about four to five minutes usually.
During this time I put my gear on.
I don't commute tho and I guess if your late for work then this may be too long to wait?
Same here... after I start the engine, it gets a couple minutes of warm up time (no throttle input, just idling) while I'm putting my jacket, helmet, & gloves on. By the time I'm ready, the temp gauge is showing one bar. From that point I'll take it easy, keeping the RPM's under 5k until I see three bars on the gauge.

My air-cooled, carby Honda XR's require a bit longer warm up, in order to get the engine temp to the point where it will idle off the choke.

@ AJ Nin... I've never heard of a car with a 'cold engine light' before.

Anyway, with my car & truck, I'll typically let it idle for about 30 seconds on cold engine start up during the summer, and several minutes in the winter months before driving off (using that time to scrape the frost off the windshield).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
401 Posts
I usually give mine a minute or two on idle will putting gloves on then keep it below 5000 rpm till on 3 bars. Bike is garaged every night also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
@ AJ Nin... I've never heard of a car with a 'cold engine light' before.
My 2004 Toyota Echo HB had a "low engine coolant temperature indicator light." The light (blue) came on when the engine was cold and went off when the engine reached normal operating temperature.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
I think that "warm up" time for motor vehicles was necessary years ago when we had (GASP!) carburetors.
Now with EFI/Computer controls and better oils I do not think that it is really needed. The beauty of EFI is that you can start the engine and go resulting in optimum fuel mileage and faster warm up time while you are riding or driving.:nerd:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,260 Posts
warm up can mean different things to different people..
different oils [ie, viscosities] require different temp
before functioning as designed..
outside temp esp when parked outside overnight etc,
makes a real difference in oil viscosity index,
and relative to viscosity of oil used [30, 40, 50 etc]

you could fill your sump with water, say,
and she would still turn over and run..
water being viscous [slippery], however,
oils do more than be slippery, lots more..
oils need to be at operating temp to work
as designed and as you pay for..

starting process for this motorcycle
of allowing revs to settle down from 2000rpm
to idle revs of 1500rpm and to idle there steadily
['heart beat'] is appropriate for sending fresh oil
around the engines mating surfaces, replacing that
very thin film of oil there from its last operation,
and to warm the oil itself, thus also increasing
its capabilities and lubricating abilities to
appropriate functional levels..

as members note, time puyying on gloves etc,
while the engine goes thru its cycle to 1500rpm
is conveniently enough to do that first warmup..

it is said that around 90% of engine wear,
all things being equal, happens at cold start up..

i live on an uphill road, so after startup cycle,
ride downhill, stop at an intersection, continue,
no need to rev her, and shes running well by then..

like anything, you can get it over with quickly
or take your time and enjoy the ride..
starting and riding away on your motorcycle
is no different.. fact is that she will, respond
and 'like' being warmed up.. just as your brain
and mind will react well to approaching and
starting your ride, wherever youre going,
by not rushing into it,, rather taking those
few quiet breathes and focussing your mind
on the ride you and your motorcycle
are about to enjoy together...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
151 Posts
If it is pretty cold I wait until the bike is warm. (below 20 degrees cel) otherwise the time it takes to put my gear on wait a few extra seconds and I don't rev the bike until at least the second bar rocks up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,565 Posts
If it is pretty cold I wait until the bike is warm. (below 20 degrees cel)

I assume would not like to live in Canada's East Coast (Nova Scotia). In the Winter months mainly late January early February it gets to be - 20 degrees C.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,009 Posts
If it is pretty cold I wait until the bike is warm. (below 20 degrees cel)

I assume would not like to live in Canada's East Coast (Nova Scotia). In the Winter months mainly late January early February it gets to be - 20 degrees C.
That's when you have to give your snowmobile a little extra warm up time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CDNHONDAR
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top