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hey guys! ive got a couple friends who dont put their bikes up on stands during the winter storage months, and i was wondering to see some of your setups, as well as your opinion on their thoughts aha,

if this has been posted already could someone link me? i havent been able to come across it?
 

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Winter storage, what's that?, ride it my friend, lovely crisp morning's , only snow and ice stop me, my ride to and from work help me unwind and de stress usually while cursing the cagers lol.

Ah scrap that, didn't notice Canada lol, paddock stands, full tank of fuel so little condensation, battery on tender, ACF50 on metal parts if garage is unheated, chanege oil, should be good then.
 

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You'll find there are all sorts of different ideas. Some people go all out, others park it and walk away. I have a 1965 Honda motorcycle and a 1971 Buick. I've gone all out, and I've done nothing. Depends on how the year for some reason.

Bare minimum is:

Full tank plus stabilizer. All you really need to do is get the weight off the tires and keeping the gasoline from gumming up the injectors.

My Buick developed flat spots on the tires after about year four. The 1965 Honda has a centre stand. Front tire has never been an issue.

Don't run it unless you're going to make sure it all comes up to operating temperature.

Other steps include covers (may increase condensation and moisture)

washing it before you put it away and oil the chain really well. Oil change in the spring or fall, doesn't really matter. Fall is ever so slightly better. You can jam something in the exhaust to keep the mice out too.

Even up here in Canada, the non-riding season is about 6-months. I ride well into October, and the bike is usually back out in April. That's really just an extended park. It's when you get into years of sitting you need to start worrying about proper storage.
 

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Mark 65 said...Ah scrap that, didn't notice Canada lol,

Yup sure makes a difference.....:eek:
 
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Mark pretty much nailed it, keeping the tank full is the important bit IMO. Up to six months isnt too much bother but beyond that it gets more critical.

I went overseas for 3.5 years in my twenties to see how folk live in the Northern Hemisphere and sow a few seeds.
On my return I found the expensive quality chain had seized solid on my bike. With difficulty I managed to remove it and boiled it up in a pot of oil which didnt work.
Then I resorted to hitting it with a hammer which didn't work either but relieved some frustration... :laugh:
 

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I quite like riding in winter. I once went riding when the temp had dropped to 16C. Brrrrrrr!
 

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Mark pretty much nailed it, keeping the tank full is the important bit IMO. Up to six months isnt too much bother but beyond that it gets more critical.

I went overseas for 3.5 years in my twenties to see how folk live in the Northern Hemisphere and sow a few seeds.
On my return I found the expensive quality chain had seized solid on my bike. With difficulty I managed to remove it and boiled it up in a pot of oil which didnt work.
Then I resorted to hitting it with a hammer which didn't work either but relieved some frustration... :laugh:
Al..Sounds like you sowed seeds of frustration....:D
 
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I never saw anyone mentioning spraying some "fogging oil" into the cylinder. That's something I do on all the seldom used engines I have. i.e. Yamaha generator (around 125cc maybe?), and leaf blower, and other gardening stuff.
i.e. when possible:
- run to full operating temperature for a while.
- let it run out of gas
- do an oil change
- I drain fully the gas. That mean accessing the carburetor and finding some kind of drain valve on it. A little like the bleeding valve on hydraulic brakes.
- remove the spark plug (single cylinder stuff here, 1 4 strokes and 2 2 strokes engines). Inspect it. (you can learn a lot from the spark plug look). move the cylinder at the lowest position, spray the fogging oil. rotate the engine a few turns, spray. put the spark plug back on.
- open the air filter, check it out / clean / replace as needed. Spray the fogging oil there too

For the motorcycle I think I would not just block the exhaust for mice control, I would also put a big red ribbon around it to not forget.

When it's time to use the engine, I put some good (fresh) gas, and usually I get a quick start.

Note that when I have to store some gas (for the generator for instance, but it's tri-fuel), as much as I can, I go to the only gas station in a 50 miles radius that has gasoline without ethanol (this is likely a USA only problem). I do use sta-bil to treat the gas, but starting with ethanol-free gas if you can find some is likely a good way. Ethanol will mix with the humidity present in the air. Hence the need to have a full tank if you want to leave gas in. It's all (full), or nothing (even drain the carburetor. letting the engine running out of gas is not enough. Eliminate the ethanol, and you do reduce a lot the water contamination problem.
 

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Trickle charger, clean chain, fuel stabilizer, oil change, cover.


Not ALL of Canada hibernates in the winter. We didn't get snow once last year in Nanaimo which means 12 months of riding baby. Coming from Ontario I have no problem riding well into December/January.
 

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God.. I am so jealous....:(
 

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Yeah I got family on the east coast. My favourite was his picture last year of a 4.5ft snowfall as he tried to shovel out his front door.
 

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Been there done that (Last winter)
 

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I never saw anyone mentioning spraying some "fogging oil" into the cylinder. That's something I do on all the seldom used engines I have. i.e. Yamaha generator (around 125cc maybe?), and leaf blower, and other gardening stuff.
i.e. when possible:
- run to full operating temperature for a while.
- let it run out of gas
- do an oil change
- I drain fully the gas. That mean accessing the carburetor and finding some kind of drain valve on it. A little like the bleeding valve on hydraulic brakes.
- remove the spark plug (single cylinder stuff here, 1 4 strokes and 2 2 strokes engines). Inspect it. (you can learn a lot from the spark plug look). move the cylinder at the lowest position, spray the fogging oil. rotate the engine a few turns, spray. put the spark plug back on.
- open the air filter, check it out / clean / replace as needed. Spray the fogging oil there too

For the motorcycle I think I would not just block the exhaust for mice control, I would also put a big red ribbon around it to not forget.

When it's time to use the engine, I put some good (fresh) gas, and usually I get a quick start.

Note that when I have to store some gas (for the generator for instance, but it's tri-fuel), as much as I can, I go to the only gas station in a 50 miles radius that has gasoline without ethanol (this is likely a USA only problem). I do use sta-bil to treat the gas, but starting with ethanol-free gas if you can find some is likely a good way. Ethanol will mix with the humidity present in the air. Hence the need to have a full tank if you want to leave gas in. It's all (full), or nothing (even drain the carburetor. letting the engine running out of gas is not enough. Eliminate the ethanol, and you do reduce a lot the water contamination problem.
Using a fogging oil is something that is done on two stroke engines which are being stored long term, and is not typically used for a four stroke engine. It's particularly recommended for those engines where a synthetic two stroke oil is used, which doesn't coat the internal parts as well as a mineral based two stroke oil does (synthetic oil tends to sit on metal surfaces in tiny droplets, rather than an even coating).
 

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Using a fogging oil is something that is done on two stroke engines which are being stored long term, and is not typically used for a four stroke engine. It's particularly recommended for those engines where a synthetic two stroke oil is used, which doesn't coat the internal parts as well as a mineral based two stroke oil does (synthetic oil tends to sit on metal surfaces in tiny droplets, rather than an even coating).
Thanks for the info. Would anything negative happen with the fogging oil in a 4 stroke engine? (I'm mostly looking at my generator, in use once or twice per year).
 

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Thanks for the info. Would anything negative happen with the fogging oil in a 4 stroke engine? (I'm mostly looking at my generator, in use once or twice per year).
Probably no harm in fogging it.
 
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Just prepped my bike for storage after putting about 2800 miles on it. I figured since the time change is next week and it's starting to dip into the 40's. My last ride into work was a clear sign to put her away to say the least lol

My prep list in order:

Adjusted tire pressure
Filled with fresh gas + fuel stabilizer + injector cleaner
Degreased/rinsed/re-lubed chain
Tensioned throttle + clutch freeplay
Changed oil + filter
Cleaned exterior + wax
Paddock stand
Battery tender
Cover

DONE!

Now I just have to prep myself for how much $$ I'm going to throw away in diesel now that I'm back to driving the truck....
 
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