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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the market for a new bike. I was strongly considering the 300F or 500F. after doing some research I found that the top speed of the 300 was about 100 to 105 miles an hour and that the 500 is only about 115 miles an hour. there is over a 1000 cost difference between the two bikes is it really worth paying over $1000 for 10 to 15 miles an hour extra? what are some of the other benefits of the 500 over the 300 and vice versa?
 

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True, insurance could be a factor depending on your age, record, all that other stuff that factors in. I would start there from a money standpoint. Also, depending on the type of riding you do, how often is that extra 15mph gonna be relevant? Cause I can tell you this, I have not had my 300R over 85mph and I have had no reason to either. Besides, that little 300 is dang near perfect for scooting around in the city and carving some back roads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have no interest in going above the speed limit at all unless needed to avoid an accident or something like that. Most of my commuting will be done in the city at about 40-45 MPH with rare interstate rides. If speed were my 1st concern don't you think I would opt for a bigger bike, like a 1000 or something?

The point I was getting at was not just the top speed but as to what are the advantages of one over the other to justify the extra cost. Considering the speed difference was not much at all, the 500 has to bring something more to the table that I am just not seeing.

What makes the 500 worth the extra 1000+?
 

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Realistically 300F top is more in the range of 95-100. But the real benefit of 500F is acceleration- you'll notice more giddy-up and longer gears even if you never top out

500F is a bit heavier and bigger, which might be better for bigger riders. Years of more comfortable riding is worth some cash. Sit on both and find out

Gas mileage on 500F is a bit less, another trade-off
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply. I did notice the 500 is a twin parallel engine. How much smoother would that make the bike over the 300's single piston design?
Everywhere I have been to will only let you sit on the bike and wont allow you to test drive or even start them to get a feel for which you might want more.
 

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Take what I've heard with a grain of salt because I can't speak from first hand experience... The 300 should be more nimble to ride / less bulky, maybe better fuel economy, lighter weight, and perhaps more fun to wring out and have more of an open access to its potential without getting in too much trouble.

I ride mostly in the city too... No regrets and I have a blast with the 300 each day. The $1,000 saved was just icing on the cake.

Also, some folks say that the 300 already has much of the real world performance the 500 has... Don't know how true that is. The 500 may just provide a different feel more than anything else.

They may not let you test ride new ones, but try to see if you can test ride a used 250 and 500 within their inventory.

All the best.
 

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Actually according to Hondas website msrp for 300f is $4000 and 500f is $5800 so its closer to a $2000 difference in what you will pay if you are buying new. If you don't do a lot of interstate riding I would go for the 300. But if you want a little more acceleration get the 500. I have not been riding long but I believe speed will not keep you out of an accident your brakes and your brain will be much better to keep you out of trouble.
 

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Actually according to Hondas website msrp for 300f is $4000 and 500f is $5800 so its closer to a $2000 difference in what you will pay if you are buying new.
Aha, that makes one think even harder about which one to get.

If you don't do a lot of interstate riding I would go for the 300. But if you want a little more acceleration get the 500.
You might even get additional stability on the highway with the heavier / bigger bike, but I'm taking a guess on this too. Might be more useful if one is on the interstate more often, as you mentioned.

I have not been riding long but I believe speed will not keep you out of an accident your brakes and your brain will be much better to keep you out of trouble.
Can't argue with that piece of advice. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
your brakes and your brain will be much better to keep you out of trouble.
This is very true.

The more I think about it, the better the 300 sounds with the exception being a lack of the X model that I would MUCH rather over the F or the R.
I know there are rumors of a 300X coming but last I've heard its not confirmed.
There is just so many things to consider lol.

I LOVE the naked look and the LCD gauges of the F But the lack of a windscreen is kind of a bummer.
I love the dual headlight design and windscreen of the R but not much else.
The X is a great cross between the two and has the most comfortable seat IMHO but less room under the seat for papers and the extra height might be a turn off for some.
Honda is killing me by making so many different options >=)

Thank you everyone for your replies it has been quite helpful. :D:D:D
 

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I have no interest in going above the speed limit at all unless needed to avoid an accident or something like that. Most of my commuting will be done in the city at about 40-45 MPH with rare interstate rides. If speed were my 1st concern don't you think I would opt for a bigger bike, like a 1000 or something?

The point I was getting at was not just the top speed but as to what are the advantages of one over the other to justify the extra cost. Considering the speed difference was not much at all, the 500 has to bring something more to the table that I am just not seeing.

What makes the 500 worth the extra 1000+?
Being a heavier bike, and along with more torque, the 500R will be better suited to carrying a passenger than the 300R will. Also the weight difference will make the 500R a bit better at dealing with cross winds when riding at highway/freeway speeds. The in-line twin cylinder engine will be smoother than the 300R's single cylinder motor. As a mid-sized bike, the 500R will be a bit more desirable as a used bike to more potential buyers who are looking to move up to something bigger, when or if you decide to sell it.

Another consideration worth taking a look at, is that since the three versions of the 500 have been out on the market for a few years you might be able to find a deal on either a clean low milage used one, or on a new non-current 2013 or 2014 model (with full a factory warranty) at a discount below the original MSRP... Honda dealers should be motivated to move those non-current bikes off their books, so you may be able to find a deal on one. With the 2015 CBR300R & CB300F being new models this year, it's unlikely to find dealers who will sell them for less than full MSRP.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
The 300F that I am looking at is going for 3700 right now. the next up being the 500 is over 5000. I could afford to get the 500 but would leave me with little or no money for TTL and gear that I will need to purchase too, like leathers.
 

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I test rode both, 300R and 500R. personally I went 300R. Yes, the 300 is quiet nimble and fun in the turns. you can push the 300 in the turns pretty hard, and yes, get into trouble. so could the 500. don't get me wrong the 500 is a nice bike too. as far as two up riding, sure the 500 would have more benefits. however, at 160 lbs myself and my GF at 108. that little 300 almost threw her from the back. we rode just fine two up on the highway at 80, and topping out at 90 mph. what about accessories? like moto mike said, more time in the market on the 500 is more accessories. my GF and I are still waiting on 300R accessories. my GF and I went the cost vs fun route, and we bought 300s. test ride both. I personally like both and they both rode fine. at the end it was cost for fun they lead me to the 300. top of my head, what does the 500 have over the 300, resale, after market accessories, maybe more comfort for you, better two up riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So in the long run the two most important factors are resale value and accessories that can make the bike even more enjoyable? Those two combined contribute to the best gains when you decide to move up or on to better things.
So for someone starting out per say its actually better to get over what you think you will need/want so you can grow and have a solid return on you initial investment so that growth can be easier... Is this correct?
 

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So in the long run the two most important factors are resale value and accessories that can make the bike even more enjoyable? Those two combined contribute to the best gains when you decide to move up or on to better things.
So for someone starting out per say its actually better to get over what you think you will need/want so you can grow and have a solid return on you initial investment so that growth can be easier... Is this correct?


my opinion, yes. as much as I hate to say this. you have a broader market as the engine CCs goes up. the quarter liters are always viewed as beginner bikes and girls bikes. its just society and male macho none sense. resale is driven by market data, and since society turns away from the quarter liters so does the market value. I also don't believe in the beginner bike path to moving up concept, or growing into a bike. I test ride and when I find something I like and can afford it, I go for it, like the 300. I got a ton of questions and crap from my "buddies" when I bought the 300. the stereo typical ego BS. oh a girls bike, oh you can't two up ride, oh you will grow out of it, blah blah. none sense, it is for me, lol...not them. I rode 650s, 1100s, 750s, 700s, and yes even a sportster lol... my first bike was a maxim 700, x model. 84 hp 500 lbs of joy, lol.... why go to a 300, heck, I couldn't stop smiling after the test ride. I swear I would sleep next to it in the garage if I could. I turned down a great used 500R that was about 500 bucks less than a new 300R. why, I had way more fun on the 300. just my honest opinion. they are your hard earned dollars. spend them on what makes you happy. one day, I hope soon, our 300s will have after market accessories too, so that should negate that comparison. if you plan to buy a 300 with the intent to sell for something else. well, just be honest about resale. people will see a 500 as more valuable than a 300 all day long. it is just ingrained ego. however, people look down on 500s too. it is all about the 600s and up. no worries, I am a cheap bum, lol... the 300 was my first bike that cost more the $2,200, lol....
bottom line, both bikes are great, and worth the money. Honda is quality hands down. both have resale challenges in my opinion. I can enjoy my group rides on the twisties just fine. I ride with Yamaha fz09s, ninja zx10s, zx6s, Yamaha v-maxes, kawi mean streaks, Harleys, you name it. I can hang with them in the turns no problem. straight a ways, they dust me. they would dust a 500. point is, I am not racing them or any one else, :). but I wanted to make sure my dollars were well spent and would last me a long time. I am a long time Yamaha rider. hearing about the R3 at aim was a kick in the gut. would I trade my 300 for an R3. no. I have too much life to enjoy in my 300. I am sure everyone here will agree. if you fid the Honda that fits. you won't worry about the extra dollars. I too considered, 300 vs 500, about 2000 grand plus taxes, hmmmm..... if I loved the 500r more than the 300. I would have easily budgeted and saved for the 500 and never worried about the extra dough. good luck, and test ride.
 

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sorry about the massive reply, lol.....at times I have too much free time. seriously, I wish you the best in your search to spend some hard earned cash. can't wait to hear how it turns out.
 

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So in the long run the two most important factors are resale value and accessories that can make the bike even more enjoyable? Those two combined contribute to the best gains when you decide to move up or on to better things.
So for someone starting out per say its actually better to get over what you think you will need/want so you can grow and have a solid return on you initial investment so that growth can be easier... Is this correct?
Not sure if I'm fully understanding what you mean to say in your last paragraph, but I'll give it a shot... Buy the bike that you will be happy with for at least a few years down the road. Especially if you are buying new. Just like new automobiles, new bikes take their big depreciation hit in the first two years.

I've seen a number of new riders who bought brand new CBR250R's, rode the bike for a few months only to turn around and put the bike up for sale, or traded it in to get a bigger bike. Usually because they felt it was too "slow"... whatever that means. I happen to think my CBR250R is plenty quick for the kind of riding I do, and I've been riding motorbikes of one kind or another for over 45 years now. While the CBR300R is basically an improved version of the 250R, with a bit more power, I can see where there will be some who will buy a new 300R and after their first season with the bike, will feel that they want something bigger/faster. It happens with these entry level bikes.

I recall one guy who had bought a brand new 2012 CBR250RA (ABS equipped) and decked it out with all sorts of aftermarket parts & accessories, full exhaust system, fuel controller, corbin seat, smoked windscreen, rear sets, suspension upgrades, and the list of anodized cosmetic farkles went on from there. Between what he paid for the bike, including freight, set-up, TT&L and all the accessories he bolted on, I recall he had something in the area of $7500 into it. Long story short, he sold the bike after owning it for 6 months and had only put 250 miles on it. Here's the kicker... he sold it for $4300 including all of the installed accessories and the original stock parts they replaced. So in the end, his 250 miles of riding fun cost him over $3000 in depreciation. Not sure why he didn't try to recoup more of his investment by returning the bike to stock and then selling the aftermarket stuff separately... probably just didn't care, or didn't want to deal with it. Whoever bought that bike scored a sweet deal on it, that's for sure.

Anyway, food for thought and just my 2 cents on the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
sorry about the massive reply, lol.
No problem man. your reply pretty much just sealed the deal for me. I am going with my gut and getting what will make me happy and do me good in the long run. Damned the resale value. I can not see spending 1-2000 more on a bike that I am not going to use and has no real advantage other than how much I can sell it for in the future..... at this point the only thing that would make me more happy is a 300X:D
 

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also I wish they made a 300X, with softer seat, longer and softer suspension,luggage mounts etc...
A 300x would go 5mph slower than the f or R, due to increased height and luggage air resistance.

My Rebel 250 has a ptwin engine, but is carbureted, has 50cc less, revs only to 9k rpm, with peak power around 7500rpm, and is less aerodynamic.
It goes 85mph top speed ( I can get it upto 87) no wind, flat road, and 78mph with lightweight passenger (170 driver, 140 passenger).
with wind in the back, the little rebel performs amazing on the interstate.
But on the way back, with head wind, the rebel performs poorly.
75 miles an hour, one person, with 20 miles an hour head wind is nothing to boast about.
With passenger, 20 miles an hour headwind, and the rebel struggles above 65 miles an hour.

I've had a Honda Shadow VT 750 before, and a Suzuki gs500f, both have the top speed of over 105MPH, but I find myself going on the highways no faster than 90MPH.
The extra power to go faster than 90MPH, is really needed when you want to drive just as fast with a 10 to 20 MPH headwind.

I guess riding with a passenger and luggage, even to cb300 f struggles to keep 80MPH speeds, with a 20MPH headwind.
for that reason, if they ever decide on making a 300x, they better upgrade the engine to 299 Cc, or make it a parallel twin, so it can keep up with the F and the R version; or the 300X will be out of air trying to travel at higher speeds for longer periods of time.
 

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The thing is, how far do you want to go?

Resale value only matters if you're going to sell it. I've never sold a bike. In fact, nobody in my family ever has. Resale matters not to us.

You could go with a 300. And if that's all you want and need, it's perfect.
But for a little bit more money, you could go with a 500, it's more power and it's more weight. If that's all you want and need, it's perfect.
But for a little bit more money, you could go with a 750, it's more power and it's more weight. If that's all you want and need, it's perfect.
But for a little bit more money.... well you get the point.

Next thing you know, you're wrestling with a +1000lbs Goldwing in a parking lot when all you really wanted was something to cruise around town in.


I could spend the next 30 years riding a 300 and I'd never need anything more.
 
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