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This is my third day of owning a new 2019 CB300R. I didn’t test ride before purchase. Although I’m very happy with my decision. I would have bought it anyway, even with my below complaint. Given my advancing age and need for a lightweight easy to maneuver bike having nice features, appearance and value. This is a fantastic bike.

HOWEVER: I’ve never experienced a bike with such short-protruding shift and brake pedals. When I first rode out of the dealership with my riding boots on, I couldn’t find the shifter because the end of it is so close to the case. But as time progresses I’m getting a little better with the shifter as I learn to keep more a pigeon-toed stance on the footrest.

BUT, I’m continuing to have real trouble with the short protruding length of the rear brake pedal. When I had to make a quick braking decision yesterday, my right foot missed the rear brake pedal entirely. That and the fact that ABS comes standard in Canada, and you have to stand doubly hard on it to get decent braking force, and the fact that downshifting gives you about zero braking force on this bike: I need to be able to hit that rear brake pedal without having to think very long about how to do it.

Has anyone encountered this problem/issue? What modifications can be made, or what rearsets can be retrofitted for the OEM ones, in order to get sufficiently protruding pedals (ala Triumph, Yamaha). ? I’m tempted to just bend the brake pedal outwards but don’t want to bust anything…

All comments appreciated.
 

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Try riding with the balls of your feet on the foot pegs, and just move them forward when you want to shift or brake. Also worth mentioning is that both the shift and brake pedals are height adjustable to suit a particular riders ergonomics.

As for lack of braking performance, get use to using the front brake more. It has way more stopping power than the rear brake.
 

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As for lack of braking performance, get use to using the front brake more. It has way more stopping power than the rear brake.
According to the (MSF) Motorcycle Safety Foundation...as much as 70% of the motorcycle's potential stopping power is supplied by the front brakes. Hard to believe, but they've done a lot more testing than I have. ;)
 

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any coordinated specific foot etc action requires repetition and deliberate practice.. 3 days is barely better than nothing here.. sliding foot directly forward from peg to brake should be easy and effective,, starting with ball of foot on peg as mm notes..
even skilled racers must learn new slight adjustments,, ie, teach their brains and joints the same but slightly adjusted skills..
specific motorcycle boots designed for riding would also help here..


rear brake is not your main brake on a motorcycle, as brake sizes demonstrate.. marquez entering corner from high speed braking on front wheel demonstrates;



whatever mods you do, the secret imo lies in specific practice sessions..
slide forward from ball of foot to lever without turning ankle or knee etc, is an idiot proof simple direct effective braking action, which still requires practice as a separate brain training skill.. find a quiet road or car park and introduce your brain to this new brake..
 

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you have to keep this in mind-- little bikes are for little people--there are a few things you can do for us full size people-what I did to my F is bar raisers- peg lowers lengthen the shift lever- lengthen the seat and level it all these mods makes the cockpit the same size as the 500F-- I really like the CB300R and preordered one 6/18 the bike was delayed 2 months so I bought an F all good -but I can see a 300R in my future-for me the only thing I think the R needs right now is the shift lenghtened
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I tried keeping the heel of my right riding boot (size 9-1/2) on the footrest. Found that I can react much quicker and more accurately on the brake lever when I'm positioned that way ! (could be that older people just don't react as well when needing to move one's foot forward) This although unorthodox might just solve my problem.

Next I think I'll try raising the gearshift pedal height a little. Right now it feels creepy especially when upshifting out of first while doing a left turn.

I might get accustomed to it after a while. Hard to teach an old dog new tricks.;)
 

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I might get accustomed to it after a while. Hard to teach an old dog new tricks.;)
Maybe.. But as long as the "old dog" is still chasing cars. it's hard to keep them on the porch. From one old dog to another.. we need to keep chasing those cars, even if we can't remember why we're chasing 'em!! Enjoy and Ride Safe. ;)
 

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The problem may also be your boots. They make boots that are a lot more narrow at the toe.

I once had to return a set of Internet boots because the toe box was "too tall" and made my foot stretched out and tilted downward angle (uncomfortable)
 

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I tried keeping the heel of my right riding boot (size 9-1/2) on the footrest. Found that I can react much quicker and more accurately on the brake lever when I'm positioned that way ! (could be that older people just don't react as well when needing to move one's foot forward) This although unorthodox might just solve my problem.

Next I think I'll try raising the gearshift pedal height a little. Right now it feels creepy especially when upshifting out of first while doing a left turn.

I might get accustomed to it after a while. Hard to teach an old dog new tricks.;)

The ball of your foot should be on the footrest, not the heel of your boot. Older people can react well, I'm 80 and have size 9 boots and my reactions are faster then many young people.
For emergency braking you only need the FRONT brake. When you brake very hard the rear wheel will lift and give no braking effect from the rear brake. You will just lock up the rear wheel and lose control. Progressive use of the front lever in an emergency will first cause the forks to compress and then brake. You will not get a front wheel skid if done correctly, even in the wet.
 

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as another old dog and lifelong motorcyclist let me assure anyone that there is always,, a better way of doing and practicing any riding skill..



heel on peg means foot is likely to touch brake lever, which is enough to wear out rear pads, when main front pads are hardly worn..
also means front of boot may find itself outside or below lever, thus closer to roadway and raised bumps or roundabouts etc..
same applies to left foot and gear changes..
just as its best to have similar ergos for hand levers its better for brain and consistent skills development for foot movements to be similar..


stock ergos are for 'average', which could be average indonesians etc, whereas everyone is different, thus aftermarket adjustable bars, pegs etc..
for raising pegs up and back check out yoshimura rear set plates.. usa made quality, fit perfectly, using stock pegs, two settings up/back..
agree on specific riding boots, heaps available today [like taichi]..


- why is it safer to take on a young swordsman than an old master -
 

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Discussion Starter #13
heel on peg means foot is likely to touch brake lever, which is enough to wear out rear pads, when main front pads are hardly worn..
Yes I thought about that. I don't put enough pressure on rear brake pedal to engage pads. What I think I'm doing is just practicing moving my foot forward by doing it (moving the heel forward onto the footrest) in advance of the actual need to do it. Eventually I'll move it forward naturally I hope.

I'm not referring to panic stopping. Just my habit when slowing a bit, to use both sets of brakes. Apart from tending to lose the front wheel in springtime on Canada's sandy gritty roads - - there's nothing wrong with only using front wheel braking and I'm not objecting to that.

for raising pegs up and back check out yoshimura rear set plates-
I was able to raise/(IMO improve) the gearshift pedal height slightly. I found there are constraints to doing that to any great extent, biggest problem is needing to maintain distance between ball joint ends of 104mm +/- 0.5mm.

I'm getting there. It's just taking a little time and some advice. Thanks.:)
 

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The problem may also be your boots. They make boots that are a lot more narrow at the toe.

I once had to return a set of Internet boots because the toe box was "too tall" and made my foot stretched out and tilted downward angle (uncomfortable)

This!!! My ol riding boots didn't cut it either. They were way too stiff and I had no feel for the brake. Now I wear leather high top tennis shoes. I love em. If you are looking specifically for a boot, Bates makes a "sneaker" type boot. These made all the difference in the world.


As far as enjoying the lightweight bike at an older age, I am right there with you. This bike does the job.... even two upping when my wife and I travel. I miss the power of some of my former bikes, but until my order for my bionic knee comes in, this bike is doing a good job.
 

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gimmee - yoshi plates come with longer rod between ball joints,, so aside from choice of two settings up and back the rod allows separate adjustments of gear lever angle..
as for heel or ball of foot etc on pegs, the bottom line doesnt appear until a split second emergency reflex response happens,, or not...
brain 'hears you thinking' and creates habitual movements based on whatever our joints/muscles do, or dont do.. creating reflex responses,
or not,, depending on consistent input,, whatever that may be...


naturally we must use common sense and experience in avoiding, potential dangers.. but reflex responses are for when there is no,, moment for reflection, before 'the brick wall' appears..
reflex evasion and reflex braking can make the difference between a head on - landing up the road,, and a nuisance repair job..
 

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Discussion Starter #16
gimmee - yoshi plates come with longer rod between ball joints,, so aside from choice of two settings up and back the rod allows separate adjustments of gear lever angle..
Thanks. With the slight adjustment I was able to make with the stock 300R rod between the ball joints.. I'm thinking I can now live with it. Getting more comfortable day-by-day.
 

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being comfortable is good, regardless, as it means less distracting feedback to brain and attention, which should best be undistractedwhile riding,, allowing full attention to ongoing road environment..
however [considering novice etc members] efficient good habits will also become comfortable, with repetition and practice..


many skills are taught by riding schools, instructors even inet videos etc, to fulfill a need, passing on experiences to make riding easier, safer more comfortable and enjoyable to novices and other riders..
everything, from lifting a fallen motorcycle to easy smooth throttle and brake control have easier, more efficient, better methods/skills,
which go together to make 'low flying' safer and more enjoyable...
 
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