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When you look at the tyre off the rim in real life the side walls are at the same angle. The actual beading is narrower than the rim. That's why i chose this particular tyre. The shape did not change on or off the rim. And that's a fact
Ride off as much of the chicken strips as you can and show us a some pics. I tell you that the edge of your chicken strip is about all the usable surface you have. The edge on that 160 is just toll vertical to be of any use.
 

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Ride off as much of the chicken strips as you can and show us a some pics. I tell you that the edge of your chicken strip is about all the usable surface you have. The edge on that 160 is just toll vertical to be of any use.
Good lord, surely our aftermarket tires don't need to pass 'the chicken strip' test as well??
I thought that was just for riders wanting to move up to a 600. @Fanatic ??! :laugh:

I must admit I was surprised that a 160 actually fits between the swing arm. I just measured 3/4 of an inch between the side of my 140 and the swing arm tho, so heaps of room there as it turns out.

At the end of the day if Wings is happy bombing around Thailand lookin sporty with a 160 on the rear and a smile on the dial then that's all that really matters.
 

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Good lord, surely our aftermarket tires don't need to pass 'the chicken strip' test as well??
I thought that was just for riders wanting to move up to a 600. @Fanatic ??! :laugh:

I must admit I was surprised that a 160 actually fits between the swing arm. I just measured 3/4 of an inch between the side of my 140 and the swing arm tho, so heaps of room there as it turns out.
True, there is a fair amount of clearance with the stock tire size. However the larger issue in this 'bigger is better' tire drama, is the ill advised practice of mounting a 160 tire on a wheel which is sized for a 140.

At the end of the day if Wings is happy bombing around Thailand lookin sporty with a 160 on the rear and a smile on the dial then that's all that really matters.
I agree... it is after all his bike to do with as he sees fit.

What I take exception to is when someone comes on to these forums and advises others (contrary to tire and vehicle manufacturers recommendations & warnings) that they can and should do the same. And as a Moderator what I find particularly unacceptable, is when said member tells other members who happen to disagree with him on this tire size issue, that they should keep their opinions and comments to themselves "unless they've tried it themselves". Obviously that's not going to fly here.
 

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Good lord, surely our aftermarket tires don't need to pass 'the chicken strip' test as well??
It was meant to point out how much of the tire will not be used or unusable meaning all that extra width was useless so why even bother. It just adds weight which lowers performance on a bike that needs all the aid it can in the performance department. Like you I removed weight to improve performance.

Look at the angle of the 160 at the edge of the tire and compare it to any motoGP rear and you'll see that even the motoGP has less steepness. And those bikes are meant to lean way over much more so then the little 300r.
 

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Point taken but i like it. And it is ok for everyday riding to work. There are a lot of people with a 150 and 160 tyre on the rear. And they mostly just ride safe and at normal speed on the roads. It all about looks i think. I like the look of it. And if other people don't like it. so be it. It is a question that is asked a lot. And i think some people are not satisfied with the answer they get. So they just go out and try it. And they find it is ok. But we are only talking about road use. Not on the track. And i think that's is why there is a lot of confusion with answers. Just because one person puts a 160 tyre on there bike it does not mean it's a bad choice for them if they like it all good. But i know everybody is entitled to have an opinion.
So for the people that like the look and is not sure about which way to go.
listen to the people's comments and if you are not getting the answer you want. You have the option to just go and try it. Yes you may lose some handling and performance, but how fast do you really want to go on the public roads. Don't let killing yourself or someone else slow you down. Just enjoy your ride and how you want it to look.
 

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motomike and other members may express their
opinion on any subject raised in this open forum..

raising a question or subject does not preclude
members from responding on any level
relevant to that subject..
this is not a court of law where one person
demands another to; 'just answer the question'..

novices and others use this forum to gain information
and so on as part of forming their own opinions
as to their motorcycles and thus to themselves
as motorcyclists..

there is room for all opinion,
not limited to any specific context
such as what any member thinks
'looks better'..
 

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If you are a person that want's to go bigger on the rear. Before you do it just measure the beading of the tyre first, Just before they put the tyre on the rim. You will see if the tyre is pulled in or not. With my tyre it is the same shape on and off the rim.
There is many rim and tyre dementions tables out there. And if you look at one of them, you can see what you can and cant fit on a four inch rim. I really think the amount of people that want to change the rear tyre out number the ones that don't. But as i said before if you want to race your bike and do crazy fast lap times just stick to the stock size. With my bike when i was able to lean it over it was fast to react. Putting the bigger tyres on has slowed that down. Once you get use to it again. You will really notice not to much as a difference.
 

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this is the thing,, that you or the rider needs to 'get used to' slower input
from oversize tyres, seems imo like accepting poorer performance
for cosmetic appearance based on looking like a bigger bike..

for me changing to pirelli sd tyres on cbr250r [after taking a screw]
then similar profile stock tyres on cbr300r included 'getting used to'
[or learning] the different - better - easier faster turn in and general
accurate steering based on the different tyre profiles..

members here and cbr250r forum esp novices but other riders
have complained or raised their problem of having to push
their bikes to enter corners or ride decreasing radius turns etc,
sparking discussions on counter steering and suchlike
steering techniques..

that 'problem' such as it might be, can be addressed by
tyre profiles and shape suitable for more direct
and quicker steering responses.. a good thing..

if you like or want slower steering, or see that as better
for novice riders etc, then its a different problem..
but otherwise it seems accepting the poorer steering
for the sake of perceived 'looks' related to
the look of larger capacity motorcycles..

for me its interesting that moto3 250cc singles
have smaller, tyres than our road 250cc singes..
not based on wanting to 'look like a racer',
rather that these very carefully designed
motorcycles are made to 'work better'
including steering and handling..
 

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shisoshin i have a question for you. On normal day to day riding in the streets N.S.W of Australia how do they ride there bikes? i think mostly around those streets it only about 50 to 60km roads. And if you go out of town 70 to 80km, and that is sometime on the the high ways as well. so when you are doing these speeds how can you possibly see a difference. Or lean you bike down anywhere. You can not. So really the only time you would see a differents is on the track. But on the other hand where i live here in Thailand the speed are very different and you can push you bike harder if you wish, But there are more straight roads with less bends. The speed limit here is not marked but it is 80 or 120 and some road don't have a limit and that is where they do ride fast. They put the bigger and softer tyres on there bike here because of the road surface being so smooth, and when it is wet that extra rubber on the road helps you slow down and stop better. To be honest and this is from Honda in Thailand one of the reasons there is a 140 tyre and the 4inch rim is to keep the cost down. The is made for bigger rims. The 300 was going to come out with a 4.5 inch rim. But because of the sale war between yamaha and Honda. Honda could not put the bike out at a higher price to match yamaha because of the honda 300 lacking in the power area. And this is why next year the 250rr is coming. And it is going to be a nice and powerful bike for a 250. It will eat the 300. But you might see it a year after. The new bikes here CBR 150, 250, 300. They are have a top speed of around 180kms. It is only the difference in the power getting to the top speed. They a all running the same frame now here. The only difference is the 150 has a smaller tank, shocks, wheels and tyres. front body fairing are the same, but smaller tail fins. The 250rr is going to have a similar frame or it could be the same as the 500r. That is what is in the motorbike mags here. In the information and in getting the new bike this country is first. And then India. And all of the other countries see them 6 months or even a year after that. If you look at a KTM 290 they run a 150 on the back from stock and they are a smaller bike. And the wheel size is the same as a 300r The changers that John McGuiness made before he won the senior TT race. Was they put a bigger rear tyre on his bike. So sometimes bigger can be better. But many of the bike manufactures do run there bikes different as in tyre sizes. Gearbox gearing, and so on.
 

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.....The changers that John McGuiness made before he won the senior TT race. Was they put a bigger rear tyre on his bike. So sometimes bigger can be better......[/COLOR]
Sorry, now I understand why you're so interested in larger tyres. Have you got your entry in for next year's TT?

I would wait till you get there and you've put a few laps in before changing tyres. McGuinness is very, very experienced round the Island circuit and holds lap records, so he's no doubt able to exceed the limits of the tyres. You might find that, at the speed you're going, you don't need more rubber.

Having said that, the IOM circuit has a very high average speed and few really slow corners, so steering speed probably isn't an issue whereas stability at 200mph is, so who knows?
 

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ONE OF THE BENEFITS OF A LARGER TIRE IS (oops>>) is a softer ride (bigger "spring") because it holds more air. Would help the woefully cheap rear suspenders on the 300s. Would be reason enough for me if I ever accumulate enough miles to need tires???
 

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ONE OF THE BENEFITS OF A LARGER TIRE IS (oops>>) is a softer ride (bigger "spring") because it holds more air. Would help the woefully cheap rear suspenders on the 300s. Would be reason enough for me if I ever accumulate enough miles to need tires???
Nobody could say the CBR3s rear suspension is too firm, so why you would want more compliance in the tyre?. Besides, the spring in the tyre carcass is undamped.
 

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No modifications needed i have a 160 on my bike and it fits with no problems, all these people that say the bike will feel worse is a load of crap. The bike feels a lot better, and you can still lean it into the corners. The only thing that i found is because i put a 160/60/17 my speedo is out a little bit. But the thing is you don't really have to change down in gear as much. You can just keep it in top gear. When i was doing 7000rpm my speed was around the 120km mark. Now it would be at 115kms But i like it. On the front it have a 120/60/17. And the bike feels just a little bit lower to.
Did you have a tire shop or the dealer install the 160? Do you know if they had any problems getting it in the original rim or setting the bead?
 

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I would not however, rely on his recommendations vis the benefits/drawbacks, or the potential handling issues. I think for him it was mostly about street cred. That's not to say I know any better, just that you should fully consider the role that tyre width and profile plays in a bike's handling. Apologies if you know this already.
 
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